Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

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Greta
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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Greta » May 2nd, 2018, 6:32 pm

Do you deny Nazism's embrace of the German existentialists?

Given that you made a bald ad hominem attack without any explanation of justification, giving me no angle of reply, it appears that you are simply slinging mud as revenge for our disagreement a week ago.

Noted.

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Londoner » May 3rd, 2018, 5:56 am

I would say some Nazis took an interest in Nietzsche in the same way they took an interest in Darwin i.e. they read some populist gloss and tried to use it to give their own views intellectual respectability. I cannot imagine what would it be like to embrace the ideas of Nietzsche; how would one live? We cannot translate the complexities of Nietzsche into a lifestyle manual. If the Nazis embraced Nietzsche, so did anarchists, Zionists, musicians, novelists, painters...

Heidegger was notoriously sympathetic to the Nazis and said things that did his academic career no harm, but I do not think we can say the Nazis embraced his philosophy. Then as now, he is very hard to understand. I do not think his philosophy was promoted; Nazism was pretty crude populism.

That said, I do not understand the relevance of whether Nazis liked a particular philosopher or not. If somebody told me Pol Pot was a fan of Logical Positivism that wouldn't say anything about Logical Positivism as a philosophy.

As far as I can tell, you have taken offence because I say I did not understand what you meant by existentialism. It was a serious point; in the context of this thread, you seem to think Heidegger is an existentialist, many would agree, but I do not think Heidegger regarded himself as one. Similarly, Nietzsche is only an existentialist in retrospect, because we see themes that are later taken up by other philosophers who are given that label. It isn't an insult to ask what (say) Kierkegaard, Camus, de Beauvoir, Dostoyevsky, Merleau-Ponty etc. have in common as if the answer was obvious.

So when you write things like: ' ...it's about the fact that existentialists painted themselves into a corner of their own design and they made their work so difficult to approach that it's now fading away.' I honestly do not understand what you mean. I do not know which philosophers you think of as existentialists and why, nor what that corner you think they have painted themselves into.

it is not a 'bald ad hominem attack' to be asked to clarify what we mean. It has been a part of philosophy since Socrates,

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Greta » May 3rd, 2018, 6:07 pm

Londoner wrote:
May 3rd, 2018, 5:56 am
Heidegger was notoriously sympathetic to the Nazis and said things that did his academic career no harm, but I do not think we can say the Nazis embraced his philosophy. Then as now, he is very hard to understand. I do not think his philosophy was promoted; Nazism was pretty crude populism.
The reaching for ideals such as purity appears to be an area of common ground, characterised in part by the Nazis' adoption of the "superman" concept.
Londoner wrote:As far as I can tell, you have taken offence because I say I did not understand what you meant by existentialism. It was a serious point; in the context of this thread, you seem to think Heidegger is an existentialist, many would agree, but I do not think Heidegger regarded himself as one. Similarly, Nietzsche is only an existentialist in retrospect, because we see themes that are later taken up by other philosophers who are given that label. It isn't an insult to ask what (say) Kierkegaard, Camus, de Beauvoir, Dostoyevsky, Merleau-Ponty etc. have in common as if the answer was obvious.

So when you write things like: ' ...it's about the fact that existentialists painted themselves into a corner of their own design and they made their work so difficult to approach that it's now fading away.' I honestly do not understand what you mean. I do not know which philosophers you think of as existentialists and why, nor what that corner you think they have painted themselves into.
I was simply making a broad point that the existentialists' notorious obliquity meant that the ideas were always going to struggle to catch on, and the clarity of materialism would have stood in stark contrast at the time, as it does now. Which to choose? Ideas that are fairly simple and intuitive (and limited) or a mysterious word salad using unfamiliar terminology that may or may not brings us closer to understanding deep questions?

In a sense, I'm expressing disappointment that existentialist thought could not penetrate the mainstream to the same extent as materialism.

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Dachshund » May 4th, 2018, 12:39 am

Spectrum wrote:
April 28th, 2018, 10:06 pm
It is the term 'Dasein' that is used everywhere in various Philosophical community and forum. Earlier I had a go at Heidegger's BT [brushed through] together with many other secondary sources. Thereafter whenever and wherever the term 'Dasein' turned up I am still not able to get a good grasp of it to offer any effective views or counter on it. So I decided to put in a serious effort to get a full grasp [hopefully] of BT. Then I note to get a full grasp will take lots of time, thus my looking for shortcuts. Since I have already put one foot into it, I do not want to stop and waste the efforts already put in.
Spectrum,

(1) RE: "Dasein". Split the word into its two syllables, i.e. Da - sein. In German, "da" means "there", more specifically "out there" in the world. Suppose there is an apple in a room where you and I are sitting together, and I ask you :"Where is the apple, Spectrum?" You point your index finger to a place in the room (where the apple is located) and say to me. "There".( A German would say "Da".) The apple you point to is located some place "out there" in the room, say on a shelf a few metres away, separated , that is, by certain distance in space from the "here" where you and I are seated.

So, "da" means "there" (out there). "Sein", in German, basically means "being" in English.

So, the term "da-sein" literally means: "being out there in the world"; and this is how Heidegger characterizes human beings. For Heidegger, a human being is "Da-sein", i.e. a being that is "out there" in the world.

(2) To get a better intuitive grasp of what Heidegger means by "dasein". Everytime you read the word "dasein" as you plough through the text of "Being and Time" get into the habit of substituting it with your own Christian name.The substitution is perfectly legitimate and it can help give you a better "feel" for what Heidegger means when he is discussing "dasein" in the book.

Regards

Dachshund

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Greta » May 4th, 2018, 1:09 am

That seems like a good idea:

“...Spectrum himself--and this means also his Being-in-the-world--gets his ontological understanding of himself in the first instance from those entities which he himself is not but which he encounters 'within' his world, and from the Being which they possess.”

Much better - thanks D! In brief, it appears that H is saying we are intrinsically relative, both in a physical and mental sense. Seemingly so.

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Fooloso4 » May 4th, 2018, 8:41 am

Dachshund:
RE: "Dasein". Split the word into its two syllables … Where is the apple … For Heidegger, a human being is "Da-sein", i.e. a being that is "out there" in the world.
The problem with this is the apple would be dasein since the apple is there, but only human beings can be dasein.. It is not the being, man, who is there, but that man is the being to which and through which Being is disclosed, that is, dasein is the there of Being. Dasein is not simply there in the world with other beings. Dasein stands out (literal meaning of exists) because only dasein asks about what it is to be, how it is, and how it should be.
Everytime you read the word "dasein" as you plough through the text of "Being and Time" get into the habit of substituting it with your own Christian name.
Dasein is a possibility of man, a mode of man’s being.

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Spectrum » May 5th, 2018, 12:13 am

Dachshund wrote:
May 4th, 2018, 12:39 am
Spectrum,

(1) RE: "Dasein". Split the word into its two syllables, i.e. Da - sein. In German, "da" means "there", more specifically "out there" in the world. Suppose there is an apple in a room where you and I are sitting together, and I ask you :"Where is the apple, Spectrum?" You point your index finger to a place in the room (where the apple is located) and say to me. "There".( A German would say "Da".) The apple you point to is located some place "out there" in the room, say on a shelf a few metres away, separated , that is, by certain distance in space from the "here" where you and I are seated.

So, "da" means "there" (out there). "Sein", in German, basically means "being" in English.

So, the term "da-sein" literally means: "being out there in the world"; and this is how Heidegger characterizes human beings. For Heidegger, a human being is "Da-sein", i.e. a being that is "out there" in the world.

(2) To get a better intuitive grasp of what Heidegger means by "dasein". Everytime you read the word "dasein" as you plough through the text of "Being and Time" get into the habit of substituting it with your own Christian name.The substitution is perfectly legitimate and it can help give you a better "feel" for what Heidegger means when he is discussing "dasein" in the book.

Regards

Dachshund
Noted your points.
Initially it is a good idea to make 'Dasein' in the direction of something personal to oneself but too much of such can be very misleading to Heidegger's original intention, i.e.
H in BT wrote:Purpose of This Book
Our aim in the following treatise is to work out the question of the Meaning of Being and to do so concretely.
Our provisional aim is
the interpretation of time as the possible horizon for any understanding whatsoever of being. (Pre-Intro)
The main purpose of BT is the Question of the Meaning of Being [in general]. Heidegger's view is the being of a Human Being is the primary being to be analyzed and understood to get to the Meaning of Being [in general] -p15.

Heidegger pointed that out in Section 5 " The Ontological Analysis of Da-sein as the Exposure of the Horizon for an Interpretation of the Meaning of Being-in-General." In this case, Heidegger is using Dasein as the primary leverage to understand the full perspective of What is Being.

I believe using one's Christian or personal name all the way to read BT can lead to heavy subjectivizing which Heidegger abhors.
The priority of Da-sein over and above all other beings[entities] which emerges here without being ontologically clarified obviously has nothing in common with a vapid subjectivizing of the totality of beings[entities]. BT-14
Heidegger did associate Dasein with "mine" "my own" "I am" "I" "Me" but these are meant to be generic to any human being rather than to an individual person.


Your "apple out there" example [more like subject - object] is not that efficient to represent 'da - sein.' Heidegger is anti-realism i.e. there is no independent object "out there" or "in here." He is also anti-idealism.

Heidegger use the concept of 'there' and 'here' and these terms are always used where the 'self' is "entangled" and 'interdependent' with the object.
I believe there are various issues [debated and discussed] regarding the term 'there' thus the alternative 'dwell.'

From the readings of BT I have done so far, I believe the term 'Dasein' need to be presented with a full Framework and System [at least a rough one] of how it is intended [in perspective] within BT plus with a contrast to the errors of the ancient and prior ontologists.

Heidegger critiqued Kant very 'violently' but I do not agree with his criticisms of Kant which are more like straw man [apples and oranges]. Nevertheless each Kant and Heidegger has their own plus points to be adopted.
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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Spectrum » May 5th, 2018, 1:18 am

As mentioned above, I believe the term 'Dasein' need to be presented with a full Framework and System [at least a rough one] of how it is intended [in perspective] within BT.
Without a solid structure to start with, one's views will flying all over with frayed and loose ends.

Here is one rough Framework and System with the following in mind;
  • Purpose of This Book - Being and Time
    Our aim in the following treatise is to work out the question of the Meaning of Being and to do so concretely.
    Our provisional aim is
    the interpretation of time as the possible horizon for any understanding whatsoever of being.
In this Framework it show;
  • 1. the Meaning of Being is grounded in
    2. Dasein grounded in
    3. Being-in-the-World, which is grounded in
    4. Care, which is grounded in
    5. Temporality
Image
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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Georgeanna » May 5th, 2018, 5:05 am

Spectrum earlier:
' I noted at present Heidegger's basic philosophy is getting very popular and applied in many fields of knowledge, e.g. existentialism, cognitive science, psychology, architecture, nursing [even this?], teaching, education, leftist politics [not Nazism], etc. etc. I believe such popularity could be due to some tangential interpretations of Heidegger's views, e.g. on authentic versus inauthentic, thrownness, being oneself, etc.. I will research into these later.'

I would be grateful if you could provide examples of where you have noted Heidegger's popularity and application of his 'basic philosophy' in e.g. nursing.

I am following this thread with interest.
I note the effort and the need for a structure/framework to 'see' the concepts.
A treasure map to grasp the gems, if you like.
What if the gold is 'fool's gold' - not worth the panning ?
Is it perhaps worth it only as an intellectual exercise...
An adventure into the labyrinths of mind.

Right now, I don't see the value to nursing. Only words like 'care' thrown in seemingly haphazardly. Grounded in temporality.
So what?

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Spectrum » May 5th, 2018, 9:46 pm

Georgeanna wrote:
May 5th, 2018, 5:05 am
Spectrum earlier:
' I noted at present Heidegger's basic philosophy is getting very popular and applied in many fields of knowledge, e.g. existentialism, cognitive science, psychology, architecture, nursing [even this?], teaching, education, leftist politics [not Nazism], etc. etc. I believe such popularity could be due to some tangential interpretations of Heidegger's views, e.g. on authentic versus inauthentic, thrownness, being oneself, etc.. I will research into these later.'

I would be grateful if you could provide examples of where you have noted Heidegger's popularity and application of his 'basic philosophy' in e.g. nursing.

I am following this thread with interest.
I note the effort and the need for a structure/framework to 'see' the concepts.
A treasure map to grasp the gems, if you like.
What if the gold is 'fool's gold' - not worth the panning ?
Is it perhaps worth it only as an intellectual exercise...
An adventure into the labyrinths of mind.

Right now, I don't see the value to nursing. Only words like 'care' thrown in seemingly haphazardly. Grounded in temporality.
So what?
For the philosophical topics which I get serious I will ensure and strive to cover all known grounds and leave no stones unturned therein. I have not completed [yet] this task for Heidegger but in the process of research I noted there were lots of theses and articles relating to Heidegger a wide spread of fields of knowledge, i.e. nursing, architectures, etc.
Since I don't have serious interests in these specific areas I have not bothered to keep track of them.

Re Heidegger & Nursing, have a look at this - Link

Here is one thesis re Nursing amongst many;
A Heideggerian phenomenological study of nurses' experience of presence

There was one paper re Nursing presented in the Conference celebrating 100 years of Heidegger.

I have introduced a summarized model of the whole of BT in a few terms but don't get misled by such simplicity. These terms are tips of icebergs with very complex sets of concepts below that are extremely difficult to grasp. The point with Heidegger's BT is whenever one come across any term or concept [many], the first thing is to suspend judgment from the typical common understanding of the term, then make the attempt to understand what is Heidegger's intended meaning for the term used.
There are few articles written justifying why Heidegger is 'torturing' readers with such an messy approach of destruction, deconstruction and reconstruction.

Btw, I not promoting Heidegger in this OP but merely trying to find tips and shortcuts on how to expedite the learning process in grasping the whole of BT. I am trying to avoid spending too much time on Heidegger. But the point is to talk of Heidegger and Dasein one need to understand [not necessary agree] BT fully and thoroughly, thus the necessary time.

I don't think I will venture to cover everything about Heidegger [like I did for Kant] which I believe will take many years especially with the introduction of the various volumes of Heidegger's work in English.
Note the 102 volumes of Heidegger's work in the Gesamtausgabe :shock: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidegger_Gesamtausgabe

Personally I believe if anyone has 3 years [full time] to spare, it would be more productive to invest that time into the full range of Kant's philosophy.
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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Georgeanna » May 7th, 2018, 8:27 am

Spectrum, thanks for reply and explanations.

Finding multiple theses concerning Heidegger, Plato, any philosopher of distinction is easy when surfing the ocean wave of the internet. It can be overwhelming.

Easy to jump to conclusions about an increase in popularity in a given field. Thankfully, from the links, there seems little evidence that Heidegger is becoming very popular in practical nursing.

Academic researchers will try to relate their specific interests with a view to publication and potential promotion.

There will always be a specific language in philosophy, created by philosophers, which makes words mean different things according to context. Words like 'Care'.

Personally, I don't have much energy for Heidegger. So, examining one of his intriguing shiny stones like 'Care' might give me an entry point - perhaps to a deeper understanding. Thanks for introduction of this term and its place in the structure.
The flowchart diagram looks interesting but I can't make out the words.

My ' So what?' was a bit cheeky but really that is one of the questions I ask throughout any difficult text I am trying to understand.

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Spectrum » May 7th, 2018, 11:16 pm

Here is another clearer image of another flowchart;

http://dinishak.com/blog/wp-content/upl ... x1024.jpg]

Heidegger used the term 'Sorge' I guess the translators could not find a better than 'care' to represent it in English.

As I had mentioned, when reading Heidegger's work one has to very mindful to suspend judgment and not be caught into taking the customary and habitualized meanings of what one is used to in English. Thus the context of the term used within BT and its framework is very important.
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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Spectrum » May 7th, 2018, 11:21 pm

The earlier link is not working, try this one;

http://dinishak.com/blog/?tag=heidegger
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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Georgeanna » May 8th, 2018, 2:25 am

Thanks for link. Most useful for an overview.
As for the repetition of advice...

I think most here understand the point about being mindful when reading translated words used in a complex philosophical context.
No matter the author.
And Very Mindful that it is Heidegger and recognize the difficulties.

Part of my issue is precisely that; the fact that it is a translation. With multiple interpretations.
Even with years of reading, I doubt that the aim of full understanding would be achieved. For that you would need to get inside Heidegger's head. And even then...
For me, a 'good enough' understanding is all that I currently require. Each to his own.

I do make an effort, up to a point, to grasp major concepts of a philosopher. And to question the conclusions.

So, with little time or patience left for density and ambiguities, I look at what is already understood. That means a limited look at online philosophy encyclopedias - e.g. the Stanford,SEP.
Also wiki. Here there is an excerpt from Heidegger giving examples of what he meant by Sorge. Also see Ereignis for an association.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidegg ... erminology

How correct or valuable this is, I don't know.

I think here is where I might bow out. Although you have tempted me...
I hope to still learn from observing your process of achieving as full an understanding as possible. It's rare to have people share this.

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Re: Any Tips on Reading 'Being and Time' Efficiently?

Post by Spectrum » May 8th, 2018, 3:24 am

From my experience, with Heidegger one need the extra mindfulness when it comes to the issue of translation.

One reason why it is so tedious to read BT is the tons of words that Heidegger twisted to his own meaning and context. Here is a list of words [some are common ones but most has new meanings specific for BT] one has to be very familiar with to grasp BT reasonably.

So one tip is to use the list of words below as a checklist and tick each one to ensure one has understood the related specific meaning else one might miss out on some critical nuance points.

From the Lexicon re Stambaugh's translation:

Abandonment, About which, Absorption, Abyss, Access (Zugang) to being, Access (Zugang) to Da-sein, Acciden, Act, Action, taking action, Actual, actuality, Actualization, Aesthetic, Affect, Affection, Afraid- Be afraid, Against, Ahead of itself, Alien, strange, Alienation, Ambiguity, Analogy, Analysis, Analytic, Anatomy, Ancient ontology, Angst, Animals, Anthropology, Anticipation of death, Antiquarian, Appearance, Apperception, A priori, Archeological, Arising, Aroundness, Art, Articulable, Articulation, As-structure, Association, At home, Attestation, Authenticity, Attunement (Befindlichkeit), Attunement (Gestimmtheit), Gestimmtsein, Authentic, Authenticity, Autochthony, Average, averageness, Awaiting,

Beginning and end, Behavior - relation, Being - concept of, Being, Being and Time, Being as such, Being in general, Being-(with, Being-in, Being-in-the-world (In-der-Weltsein), Being-one's-self, being-its-self (Selbstsein), Being together with (Sein bei), Being toward, death, one's own most, Being-with (Mitsein), Belonging, Beyond itself, Brightness,

Calculating, Calendar, Call of conscience, Care (Sorge), Category, Certainty, Change, Change-over, Choice, Circle, Circumspection, circumspect (Umsicht, umsichtig), Clearing, Clearedness, Close off, Co-attunement, Coming toward, Common sense, Communication, Come to be and pass away, Conceal, hide (verbergen), Concealment (Verborgenheit), Concept, Concern (Fiirsorge, solicitude), Concrete, concreteness, Condition of possibility, Connection, Conscience, Consciousness, Considerateness, Conspicuousness, Constant, constancy, Constitution, Construction(s), Copula, Corporeal thing, Corporeality, Cover up - cover over; conceal - hide, Crisis, Critical, Criticism, critique (Kritik), Culture, Curiosity (Neugier),

Da-sein, Datability, Death, Deception, delusion, Dedication, De-distancing, Deficient, Deformalize, Deliberation, Delivered over, entrusted (uberantwortet), Demise, Demonstration, Depersonalization, De-presentifying (Entgegenwiirtigung), Derivative, Description, Despair, Destiny, Destructuring, De-theologized, Detrimentality, harmfulness, De-worlding (Entweltlichung), Diaeresis, Dialectic, Die, dying, Difference, Directing oneself toward, Directionality, Disappea, Disavowal, Disclosure, Disclosednes, Discourse, Discover(y), Discoveredness, Dispersion, distraction (Zerstreuung), Dissecting, Distance, Distantiality, Distortion, disguise, Doxographic, Drive, Dumb, mute, Duration, During, Dwelling,

Economics, Ecstasy, Ecstatic, Ecstatic unity, Eddying, Ek-sistence, Empathy, Encounter, Encountering, End, Enigma, Entangle(ment) (Verfallen: also "falling prey.", Entanglement (Verjangnis:, Epistemology, Equanimity, Equiprimordial(ity), Es gibt (there is, "it gives"), Essence, Essence (Wesen), Estimating, Eternal, Ethics, Ethnology, Eudaemonism, Evade, Event (Ereignis), Everydayness, Everyone, Everywhere and nowhere, Evidence, evident, Evil (Obel, noun), Evil (bose, adj.), Exhibition, Existence (Existenz),, Existence, philosophy of, Existent [seiend], Existential (existenzial, Existential(s), Existential analytic, Existential-ontological, Existential-temporal, Existentiality, Existentiel, Existing, Expecting, Experience (Erlebnis: lived experience), Experience (Erfahrung, Explanation, Explicitness, Expressing, Expression, expressedness (Ausgesprochenheit), External world (Aussenwelt, Extreme: See instead Most extreme,

Fact, Fact, Facticity, Factual, Factuality, Faith, Falling Prey, (Verjallen, also entanglement), Familiarity, Farness, distance, Fate, Fear, fearing, Feeling, Find oneself, Finiteness, finitude, Flight, For-the-sake-of-which, For-one-another, Fore-conception, Fore-having, Fore-sight, Fore-structure, Forget, Forgottenness, Formal, Formal Indication, Formalism, Formality, Formalizing, Found, Foundations, Free, freedom, Free (freigeben, verb), Free-floating, Fulfillment, Function, Fundamental analysis, Fundamental ontology, Future, futural,

Genealogy, Generation, Genesis, Genuine, Genus, Geographical, Geometry, Given(ness), God, Grammar, Greeks, Ground, (griinden, Ground (Grund, noun), Groundless, Guilt, guilty,

Hand down, over, Handiness [ready-to-hand], Have been, having-been, Have to be, Have to do, Having, possession, Having, Hearing, Hearsay, Heedful, Heedfulness, "Here," the, Heritage, Hermeneutical, Hermeneutic(s), Heroes, Historian, Historicality, Historicism, Historicity, Historiography, History, Hope, Horizon, Horizonal, "How," the, "How one is",

I, the (das Ich), Ideal, Idealism, Idle talk, If-then, Illusion, Immanent, Imminent, Impossibility, In itself, In-order-to, the, In the face of which, the, Inauthentic, Indebtedness, Indefiniteness, Indeterminate Immediate, Indicating, Indifference, Indifference (Indifjerenz), Indifferent mode: versus deficient mode, Individualize, individuate, Infinite, Infinitive, Inner, inward, Innerworldly (innenveltlich), Insideness, Insignificance, Intelligibility, Intend, Interpretation, Interpretation, Interpretedness, Intuition, Irrationalism, Irresoluteness, Isolate, It is concerned in its being about this very being, It "knows" where it itself stands,

Joy, Judgment, Just looking, , Keeping silent, Knowing, knowledge, Knowledge (Wissen), Knowledge (Kenntnis)

Lack, Language, Law, Lay open, Leeway, Leaping, Letting, Liberate, Life, living, live, (Leben, leben), Light, Limit-situation, Linguistics, Listening, Literature, Location, locus, place, Logic, Logistics, Look, Looking, Lose, losing, Lostness, Love, Loyalty( Fate)

Magic, Making present (Gegenwartigen), Making room, Man, human being, Manifestness, Material, Mathematics, Matter, Meaning, Meaning of being, Measurement, Medical, Medieval ontology, Method, methodology, Mineness, Missing, lacking, MitDa-sein (co-existence), Modalization, Modes, Modification(s), Moment, Monument, Mood, Moral, Most extreme, Motion, Movement, Multiplicity, Museum, Myth, ,

Nature, Nearest/farthest (niichste/fernste), Nearness (Niihe, an existential), Necessity, Negating, negation, New, the, Nihilism, Nobody, no one, Nonbeing, Not, the-Not, Not-to-be-bypassed, Not-yet, Nothing(ness), the (das Nichts), Now, now-here, Nowhere, Nullity, Numbed, benumbed, Number,

Object (Objekt), Object (Gegenstand), Objectivation, Objective(ly), objectivity (ObjektivitiitJ), Objective, objectivity (Sachlich[keitJ), objective presence [presence-at-hand](Vorhandenheit), Objectivity, Obstinacy, Obtrusiveness, Obviousness, Self-evidence, Occurrence, Ontic, Ontic-ontological, Pre-ontological Ontology, Open(ing), Openness, Opportunity, Orientation, Origin, Original, Originality, Originary, Other(s), the (der Andere), Other-worldly, ,, the, Outside, Outstanding, Owe,

Paralogism, Pass away, Past, Perceiving, Perish, Persistence, Person, Phenomenology, Phenomenon, Philological, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Plunge, Poetry, Point, Point out, Political, Position, Positive, Possibility, Possible, the, Potentiality of being, Power, Practical, Pragmatic, Praxis, Pre-{vor-): pre-ontological, Predicate, predication, Predilection, Prefiguration, prescription, Presence, Presencing, Present, Preservation, Presupposition, Primitive, Primordial, Primordiality, Priority, Privation, privative, Production, Project(ing), Proof, Property, Provenance, Psychical, Psychologism, Psychology, Public, publicness, Punctuality,

Question of (the meaning of) being, ,

Rapture, Rationalism, Read(ing) off, Ready, Reality, Realism, Reason, Reckon, Reference, referential, References of "in order to," kinds of, Reflection, Regard, Region, Reification, Relation, Relativity, Relevance, Remembering, Remoteness, Remove, Representation, Resistance, Resoluteness, Resolution, Responsible, Reticence, Retrieve, repetition, Reveal, Rhetoric, Rootedness, roots,

Scandal of philosophy, Scepticism, Schema, scheme, Schematism, Scholasticism, Science, Seeing, Self, the, Self-(Selbst), Selfness, Selfsameness, Sensing, Serviceability, Showing itself, self-showing, Shrinking bac, Sight, Sighting, Sign, Significance, Signify, signification, Silence, keeping silent, Solipsism, Soul, Source, Space, spatial, Spatiality, Spirit, spiritual, Stand, Standpoint, Statement, proposition, Staying, lingering, Steadfastness, Steadiness, Stream (Strom, Fluss): of experiences, Stretch, Stretching along, Structure, Structural, Subject, subjectivity, Submission to, Subsist, subsistence, Substance, Substantiality, Succession, Suicide, Sum, Summons, Sun, Surrender, Surrounding world, Symbol, Symptom, Synthesis, System,

Tautology, Technology, technical, Temporality, Temporal, temporality, Temporalizing, That it is ... and has to be, Thematization, Then," the, Theology, There, the (das Da), There is, They, the (das Man), They-self, Thing, thingliness, Things at hand (Zuhandene, Things themselves, Think, thinking, This-worldly, the, Thrown, thrownness, Time, To-be, Today (heute), Tolerance, Tool, Totality, Tradition(al), TranquiIlization (Beruhigung, Transcendence, Transcend(ing), Transcendent, Transcendental, Transition, TransMit, Transparenc, Truth, Typology,

Uncanny, Unconcealment, Understanding, Understanding itself, Understanding of Being, Underway, Unity, Universal(ity), Untruth, Upon-which, the, Uprooting, Urge (Drang), Usabilit, Use, Useful thing (Zeug) [Equipment], Using, Utilitarianism,

Validity, Value, Veil, conceal (verhilllen), Violent, Voice, Vulgar,

Way, Way to be, way of being, We-world, Whence, the (das Woher), Whither, the, Who," the-Who (das Wer), Whole, the (das Ganu), Wholeness, Will, Willing, Wishing, With (Mit), With-world, Within-timeness, Word(s), Work•world, World (Welt), Worldliness (Weltlichkeit), Worldless,
Not-a-theist. Religion is a critical necessity for humanity now, but not the FUTURE.

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