Have we grasped the implications of Gödel's theorems?

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Mlw
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Have we grasped the implications of Gödel's theorems?

Post by Mlw » July 17th, 2018, 9:14 am

In my view, Gödel's theorems lead us to conclude that no perfect logical order, which relies on its own criteria, can be created. It spells demise for all philosophical systems and societal totalitarian systems, because one cannot create a "hermetically closed logical structure", even though the internal logic is perfect. It simply cannot work. It runs up against self-contradictions; so it's no use trying. Russell's and Whitehead's Principia Mathematica could not be completed for this reason.

It also means that cosmologist won't be able to create a Grand Unified Theory of all the natural laws. We will never be able to wholly understand the universe, because it cannot be built around a set of natural laws that work in harmony to create a unified and perfect whole.

It also means that we cannot create a machine capable of thinking logically on its own device. AI is a hype, created to fool politicians and institutions to contribute economically.

M. Winther | http://two-paths.com

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Mlw
Posts: 220
Joined: July 23rd, 2010, 5:03 am
Favorite Philosopher: Augustine of Hippo
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Re: Have we grasped the implications of Gödel's theorems?

Post by Mlw » July 19th, 2018, 3:13 am

It's not like a philosopher can ignore this monumentally important discovery in mathematical logic.

Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems

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