Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

We choose one philosophical book per month to read. Then we discuss it as a group.

Nominate books to be philosophy book of the month.


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June 2017: The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus


Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#151  Postby Lagayscienza » August 5th, 2015, 2:28 am

In light of the interesting and currently very active thread on whether consciousness could be produced in machines I nominate Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies by Nick Bostrom who is a professor in the Faculty of Philosophy at Oxford University and the founding Director of the Future of Humanity Institute

This book well written and easy for the layperson to follow.

There's a good blurb about it on Amazon.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#152  Postby Deborah » August 8th, 2015, 10:42 am

I nominate The Fall, by Albert Camus. My sense is that this book is about witnessing, and interrogates and elucidates the challenges of witnessing, as well as the moral responsibility to grapple with these issues, and the consequences of the lack of witnessing. A very relevant book for our times.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#153  Postby Wilson » August 25th, 2015, 2:14 pm

Has anyone suggested The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements ? That's a fascinating old one by Eric Hoffer, the "longshoreman philosopher". Huge insights into "what drives the mind of the fanatic and the dynamics of a mass movement”.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#154  Postby Kingbtd » November 9th, 2015, 2:19 pm

I nominate the Mereology: The Origins of Garlic Cures and the Art of Telling a Tale of Ragout, by Keith Lyons. From the Bird Dog Books web page:

"Mereology: The Origins of Garlic Cures and the Art of Telling a Tale of Ragout" is scientific journalism of philosophical proportions that entertains and informs layman while providing a method for scientists to use in understanding the "proto-concepts" underscoring their own theories; thus opening an awareness to "where", "when", "how" and "why" scientists have arrived at the questionable time and space in which they (and we) are all now living. As a delivery device, humorous life experiences as well as tragic, tasty metaphors and toothsome examples, as are befitting a Tale of Ragout are used to bring forth meaning in the difficult to understand "proto-concepts"

The life stories narrating the "Tale of Ragout" push, with speeds reaching well beyond that of light particles, the reader along with tales of amputation, murder, poisonings, mafia dealings, nuthouse internment, skateboarding, cross country bicycle tours, conspiracy-theories-come-true, indiscriminate sexual encounters and punk rock.

Proto-concepts in mereology: In the easy definition, mereology is sometimes referred to, by "garlic-free" theoreticians, as the "parts and whole relation", but such a definition is only partly true. A better way to describe it would be the "difference relation": Because any and every object of and in the relation belongs to the "dialogue". Thus, the easy definition stems from default logic: From out of a "historical dialogue" which has come to embody only otherness, and, consequently, can only recognize "self" as a "negotiator" of said difference and, here's the clincher, not as another difference in the whole mix. But in a "garlicky" mereology, the default logic is revealed in its faults and difference itself becomes the focal point or origin in the relation between Existence and Life...and it is whereby just such a relation of dialogue, regardless of whether one is talking about the faulty or garlicky mereology, that existence and life are always experienced and have never been, until now, "completely" revealed, and, in as far as the results of a mereological endeavor generate formal logic, mathematical and geometrical concepts can be found "in deliverance" in their purest "form-ing".

The theoretic discourse is based on the phenomenological works of Edmund Husser, Ernst Cassirer, Mikhail Bahktin and Max Scheler, and argues that George Berkeley, Gottfried Leibniz and Baruch Spinoza separately deconstructed the mereological experience found in Ancient Philosopy (in general). Mostly, the Garlic Cures uses as its main go-to Ancient source, as the argument is simplified for the sake of making the book less than five hundred pages, the works of Aristotle.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#155  Postby Alan Jones » December 22nd, 2015, 3:39 pm

Hello Scott,
I would like to nominate Louis Menand's "The Metaphysical Club". I recently read it, and would like to discuss the ideas covered, the reasons for setting traditional philosophical notions aside. Menand shows how American Pragmatism grew from the intellectual and social environments that followed Darwin and the American Civil War. It's a pleasure to read. Here is a one review: nytimes.com/2001/06/04/arts/04MASL.html
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#156  Postby Steveroonie » February 8th, 2016, 2:04 pm

regenesis by church---- because the technology discussed will radically change our world
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#157  Postby Desertwisdom » April 8th, 2016, 3:02 pm

I would suggest a very short work entitled: "Wittgenstein's Poker". I cannot recall the author. It is based on an incident in Wittgenstein's life, but has many philosophical references. I enjoyed it immensely.

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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#158  Postby David Ross » June 29th, 2016, 12:32 pm

I nominate my own book, Spheres of Change: A guide to you singing your song.

Excerpt:

What is love? Jesus was a warrior for love, and who came with a sword. A sword is a weapon of war. Can there be war on behalf of love?1 What is its truth? To respond, it is necessary to distinguish between being a warrior and a solider. A warrior is named by war, a soldier is named by soulde ‘(soldier's) pay,’ from Latin solidus. A warrior fights in the name of his/her cause while a solider does so for pay. A true warrior, moreover, fights for truth, and this cannot be bought or sold.
Why? Truth is of betrothal, of engagement, and the object of betrothal is marriage, union with the Beloved, and true love is given freely, not bought or sold, commercialized love, love degraded and debased. What of the warrior? Does this mean that the warrior fights because he or she loves war? Yes, if 'war' means a 'good fight.' A true warrior fights for what is good, and this is not necessarily what is conventional, accepted, or understood. However, how does one know what is true? What is true love? However the topic is considered, the problem of love has never been simply one problem among others. But never as much as at present has it invaded, as much, the global horizon of the most diverse researches and the most heterogeneous discourses, diverse and heterogeneous in their intention, method, and ideology...The Wolfman feels his chin itching with new growth, and he scratches it.

VOILÀ, THE WOLFMAN GROWS A BARD!
In Shakespeare's work, the Wolfman imagines the talk of heterogeneous discourses, diverse and heterogeneous in their intention, method, and ideology beginning with a bit from As You Like It.
ROSALIND
Yes, one, and in this manner. He was to imagine me his love, his mistress, and I set him every day to woo me; at which time would I, being but a moonish youth, grieve, be effeminate, changeable, longing and liking, proud, fantastical, apish, shallow, inconstant, full of tears, full of smiles; for every passion something, and for no passion truly anything, as boys and women are, for the most part, cattle of this colour; would now like him, now loathe him; then entertain him, then forswear him; now weep for him, then spit at him, that I drave my suitor from his mad
humour of love to a living humour of madness, which was to forswear the full stream of the world and to live in a nook merely monastic. And thus I cured him, and this way will I take upon me to wash your liver as clean as a sound sheep’s heart, that there shall not be one spot of love in ’t. (As You Like It, Act 3, Scene 2)2
Love is neither infatuation (moonishness) nor lust (pornography, venality). How so? Consider desire, wolf-man pondered. He wanted to recall the place before he became a failure and thought of, when thinking of love, the harmonic series. That is the Place, the fundamental tone, and things became dark. The dark earth; he could smell the scent of the Earth, and it was death. Lucifer could smell ashes. Towering infernos, blazing in the hellish night. A rich, powerful nature. Shouting voices. He wanted to run – to where? He wanted to embrace his destruction, run into the pit. Then he saw prisoners, uniforms and barracks, a work camp. It did and it didn't exist.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#159  Postby Shar » September 13th, 2016, 3:40 pm

I would recommend this book: The Shape of Ancient Thought: Comparative Studies in Greek and Indian Philosophies Kindle Edition
by Thomas McEvilley.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#160  Postby Curious kuku » November 17th, 2016, 7:38 am

'On what is' by Stephen Halston. Available from the site Lulu

The book is free to download. It's central theme is pretty straightforward: There is a flaw that lies at the heart of the western analytic tradition.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#161  Postby Gil1961 » January 12th, 2017, 3:22 pm

I nominate Existentialism 2d ed. b David Cooper
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#162  Postby TigerNinja » March 23rd, 2017, 2:34 pm

I'm raising the flag for Man, Beast and Zombie. It's not purposely philosophical and it doesn't directly go into philosophy, although it brings up a large amount of philosophy and heavily philosophically debated topics. Even though I read almost the entire book, but didn't finish it, vote for it all the way.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#163  Postby Dissimulation » March 24th, 2017, 9:59 am

The Trial - Franz Kafka (1925).

A rich narrative accessible to most readers expressed in a truly terrifying and relevant story. Kafka Challenges the reader to ask difficult questions both as an individual and the relation between the individual and the external world. Issues of Liberty, justice, law, guilt, individualism, tyranny and the dangerous of internalized guilt. Interestingly the story warns of the dangers of expectancy and the frailty of social convention and dogma. The dialogue
between Joseph K. (protagonist) and other various characters it truly remarkable and equally frustrating. An Interesting Parable titled "before The law' is offered to Joseph and is likely to raise many interesting discussions. Like many characters in Kafka's works, Joseph K. is a character that I suspect people will interpret in very decisive ways - Human, in all its beauty and ugliness. After reading The Trial several years ago I was left with a feeling of uneasiness and discontent that stayed with me for some time, compelling me to workout the ideas and form my own opinions. I am excited at the prospect of the passionate discussions and arguments that it may produce.

In reflection the story influenced me (normative) to develop a more critical methodology in approaching texts (personal statement, not to be interpreted as an argument for nomination). If anyone has read the book (if not, argument is restricted) I contend that it is presently equally relevant due to the current state of the world and the lack of transparency between the individual and institutions that command authority.
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#164  Postby Oxus_Scythian » May 4th, 2017, 8:15 am

Holy wow this thread is old. If possible I'd like to nominate: The Geography of Thought by Richard E. Nisbett
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post Number:#165  Postby Alan Jones » May 4th, 2017, 3:31 pm

I remember reading about this book. Will find a copy. Any other suggestions of books that address the effect of human ecology on thinking styles?
"Beliefs are what divide people. Doubt unites them." - Peter Ustinov "Every great advance in natural knowledge has involved the absolute rejection of authority." - Thomas Huxley
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