Vote for the May 2013 philosophy book of the month

We choose one philosophical book per month to read. Then we discuss it as a group.

Nominate books to be philosophy book of the month.


UPCOMING BOOK

June 2017: The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus


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Which book do you want to be the May book of the month?

Who Am I? and if so, how many?
7
33%
The Beginning of Infinity
9
43%
Lying
2
10%
no preference
3
14%
 
Total votes: 21

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Scott
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Vote for the May 2013 philosophy book of the month

Post by Scott » March 31st, 2013, 5:44 pm

Please use this topic to cast your vote for the May 2013 philosophy book of the month. The poll will be open for 11 days from the time of this post. Whichever book has the most votes by then will be the May book of the month. Click on the following links to learn more about each book:

Who Am I? and if so, how many? by by Richard David Precht

The Beginning of Infinity by David Deutsch

Lying by Sam Harris
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Check it out: Abortion - Not as diametrically divisive as often thought?

Rombomb
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Re: Vote for the May 2013 philosophy book of the month

Post by Rombomb » April 6th, 2013, 9:19 am

Also consider the books website (you can read the intro): http://beginningofinfinity.com/
Regarding _Lying_, by Sam Harris: [amazon=]B005N0KL5G/ref=zg_bs_11019_12[/amazon]
Albeit with tongue in cheek, Mark Twain once wrote: "No fact is more firmly established than that lying is a necessity of our circumstance--the deduction that it is then a Virtue goes without saying." Well, Sam Harris begs to differ. And differ he does, with an impassioned, straight-shooting argument not only that lies are "the social equivalent of toxic waste," but also that each of us is capable of, and would benefit from, a life led free of the lie. Harris takes his time defining and stratifying types of lies--from adultery to government cover-ups to the seemingly innocuous little white lie--but insists that at any scale, a lie "condenses a lack of trust and trustworthiness into a single act."
Harris is wrong to think that all lying is bad. For example, lying in self-defense is good.
We are all fallible -- anyone of us can be wrong about any one of our ideas. So shielding any one of my ideas from criticism means irrationally believing that I have the truth.

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HugBeam
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Re: Vote for the May 2013 philosophy book of the month

Post by HugBeam » August 20th, 2013, 8:10 am

Staff, this topic should be unstickied. It's really old.

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