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How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Use this philosophy forum to discuss and debate general philosophy topics that don't fit into one of the other categories.

This forum is NOT for factual, informational or scientific questions about philosophy (e.g. "What year was Socrates born?"); such homework-help-style questions can be asked and answered on PhiloPedia: The Philosophy Wiki. If your question is not already answered on the appropriate PhiloPedia page, then see How to Request Content on PhiloPedia to see how to ask your informational question using the wiki.
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BethMa
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by BethMa » June 11th, 2013, 4:45 am

It is just simple as 'if one talks, the other should listen' plus listening with your mind and heart open so that you could fully understand the conversation.

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Rayliikanen
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Rayliikanen » June 11th, 2013, 8:46 pm

For an example of an abstract child, spawned by philosophy, and Kant, you can check out my child at Causalargument.com

If this is not abstract I don't know what abstract is.

Calrid
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Calrid » December 30th, 2013, 7:21 pm

It would be nice if people made an attempt to answer your questions too, instead of launching salvos of ad homs and nonsense about you in lieu of addressing your points, but that would be the dream. ;)

-- Updated December 30th, 2013, 6:21 pm to add the following --
Rayliikanen wrote:For an example of an abstract child, spawned by philosophy, and Kant, you can check out my child at Causalargument.com

If this is not abstract I don't know what abstract is.
That is not abstract.

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JohnSPreston
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by JohnSPreston » January 8th, 2014, 11:18 am

I think it is important also to recognise the limitations of language in communicating ideas. When speaking to you I am trying to convert my inner thoughts and feelings to words, in the hope that you will be able to accurately translate them back again into a thought that resembled mine. Ultimately, something will always be lost in the translation, because thoughts are not words. (Alfred Korzybski - I think). Unfortunately most people become so used to doing this that they use language to filter their own thoughts from themselves. To fulfil your full potential you need to learn to let go of language and think without words. This is the path to true enlightenment.

As an interesting side topic I think that the ability to communicate without language is one of the primary functions of art. You can, for example, try to use language to communicate the nostalgia and angst of lost love in Paris, or you can sum it up with one guitar rift by Gary Moore.

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3uGH7D4MLj
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by 3uGH7D4MLj » January 8th, 2014, 4:27 pm

Hi John, Interesting comment, thanks. Words and thoughts. I'll have to look up Korzybski. I started a topic concerning this: http://onlinephilosophyclub.com/forums/ ... f=2&t=7930
fair to say

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JohnSPreston
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by JohnSPreston » January 8th, 2014, 5:36 pm

3uGH7D4MLj wrote:Hi John, Interesting comment, thanks. Words and thoughts. I'll have to look up Korzybski. I started a topic concerning this:
You are welcome. I have commented.

Calrid
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Calrid » January 8th, 2014, 7:15 pm

I think if you set out to have productive philosophical conversations that there is some chance that will happen, what with the internet being what it is Lord bless it though, there is no guarantee. :)

XavierAlex
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by XavierAlex » January 10th, 2014, 3:22 pm

I suppose a productive conversation of any sort, be it philosophical or not, needs to start with some inquiry. Each individual then posts in a sincere way their answer, their refutation, and/or other questions that may be relevant. Usually within one's writing they try to see both sides of the coin, or try to imagine other perspectives. However, what is necessary, for truth or some kind answer to be obtained as some kind of product, some kind of entity, then a basic general understanding of the rules of grammar must be used. If the writing is sloppy, it shows the reader two things: 1. It probably wasn't thought out. 2. The writer didn't care enough to be clear for audiences.

The question in my mind is, if the person isn't as clear as they can be, they certainly haven't grasped fundamental building blocks in education. Philosophy is a more esoteric discipline, as is astrophysics, and so forth. If there is from the very first sentence, an incompleteness, and continual incoherence throughout the post, then either the person has little to no education, or they have no regard for their audience. They simply want to dodge around statements and ideas. If they have no education (not necessarily schooling), then they won't know definitions, references, and generally will not follow up as a scholar. If they have no regard for their audience, then nothing productive will come of stubbornness, especially in a realm where some of the central tenets are: respect, curiosity, open-mindedness, and even the ability to explicate complex ideas they may have into a more public domain.

Belinda
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Belinda » January 11th, 2014, 5:12 am

XavierAlex wrote:
even the ability to explicate complex ideas they may have into a more public domain.
Some concrete ideas are complex, such as are many ideas from the sciences. 'Complex' and 'abstract' are not the same. Philosophy deals in abstractions from the concrete. An utterance might be rude or discourteous but will still be philosophical ( or mathematical) if it deals in abstract ideas.

Scott's advice regarding the use of the General Philosophy part of the Forum is an example of advice to omit the concrete, which is to be confined to the Philosophers' Lounge.
This forum is NOT for factual, informational or scientific questions about philosophy
However the advice in 'How to Have Productive Philosophical Conversations' is not about content but about debating style.
Socialist

XavierAlex
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by XavierAlex » January 11th, 2014, 8:53 pm

Belinda wrote:XavierAlex wrote:
even the ability to explicate complex ideas they may have into a more public domain.
Some concrete ideas are complex, such as are many ideas from the sciences. 'Complex' and 'abstract' are not the same. Philosophy deals in abstractions from the concrete. An utterance might be rude or discourteous but will still be philosophical ( or mathematical) if it deals in abstract ideas.

Scott's advice regarding the use of the General Philosophy part of the Forum is an example of advice to omit the concrete, which is to be confined to the Philosophers' Lounge.
This forum is NOT for factual, informational or scientific questions about philosophy
However the advice in 'How to Have Productive Philosophical Conversations' is not about content but about debating style.
Here it may be noted that the subject of the XavierAlex's quoted sentence isn't "complex" or "ideas", but the ability--should one choose to do so.

Stormcloud
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Stormcloud » January 14th, 2014, 5:25 am

Boy oh boy, thank goodness some people are able to get their message across with simplicity and without a great spiel.

Professionalism at best, is but glorified ignorance in disguise.

Jfischer1
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Jfischer1 » March 20th, 2014, 7:47 am

But the thing is, that if you're already that self aware that you know how or to, or even have thought about what it is to actually converse, you're a bit more likely to succeed in the sense that you don't just tend to blindly adopt a view and take any question of it as a negative thing, because being aware that a thing such as a philosophical conversation exists means that you're a bit more self aware than most, because philosophy being used to learn and understand is a very basic and important idea of it. Choosing not to think and getting defensive to critiques is the same as just not existing as a human, since we as humans feel the need to think freely or always want to know more because we seem to be the only thing capable of it that is known to us so far.

Cogito ergo sum
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Cogito ergo sum » June 28th, 2014, 7:18 am

You need to not go into the conversation as someone who knows more then the person you are speaking with. I find that if you both appear to be reaching a conclusion at the same time as the person you are speaking to, then you can get more revealing answers because you are equals . No one wants to think that someone knows more then them, so when going into philosophical discussions with people who might not be into that, you must start at the same point as them and take the journey together. At the same time I believe there are certain philosophical conversations that should not be discussed with people who are not of that mindset. They will understand through actions and the way you live your life, conversation will merely confuse and blur the lines for the listener.

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Adz001blue
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by Adz001blue » February 2nd, 2015, 6:50 am

Absolutely. If you would like someone to respect your perspective opinions you need to first show respect in your mannerisms. No one should be judged as no one has walked the same path.

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HZY
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Re: How To Have Productive Philosophical Conversations

Post by HZY » February 2nd, 2015, 10:36 pm

That's good, although rules tend to negate emotions and the free flow of thoughts.

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