What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Use this forum to discuss the philosophy of science. Philosophy of science deals with the assumptions, foundations, and implications of science.
Burning ghost
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by Burning ghost » January 15th, 2018, 4:52 am

To All -

Hobbes (from Stanford Encyclopedia):
Moreover, there is perhaps in Hobbes’s method something like the middle step of regressus. For Hobbes, to know an effect through its causes is to know what the causes are and how they work: “We are said to know scientifically some effect when we know what its causes are, in what subject they are, in what subject they introduce the effect, and how they do it” (Hobbes 1655, 6.1).
nameless -
Not anything can ever be demonstrated to exist, unless it is perceived.
Okay, numbers don't exist, language doesn't exist, subatomic particles don't exist, yellow doesn't exist, size doesn't exist, reason nor logic exist, and neither does the universe. Of course you can now happily readjust your conception of "perception" by posting the dictionary definition of "perception." If you do so you've done no more than present circular logic.
Call it as you will, it remains Truth.
Truth is not 'falsifiable'.
There is a difference between what 'reason' is, and what (formal) logic is? I think so.
It remains so because we don't go around saying things like "truth" is "truth" like it is some profound statement. Neither do we go around pointing at objects saying "object." That is called tautology.

The difference between "reason" and "logic" is not that great. Reason is the application of logic, but if you meant "football" is not the same as "playing football", then yes, they are different. If you meant in the colloquial sense when you said "reason" then considering this is a philosophy forum you should've been more clear and perhaps even explored what the colloquial use means for us here?

I still have no idea what you are talking about when you say "real" scientist or "real" philosopher. Is this a case of anything I say not being a "true Scotman?"
AKA badgerjelly

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SimpleGuy
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by SimpleGuy » January 15th, 2018, 1:05 pm

Science can be proven or disproven via experimental data or logical deduction or computer investigation. Philosophy states general conjectures within a human society or a single mind that emphasises, the view of a certain person on reality without beeing able to prove it. Philosophy is dependent on how people perceive something and with it can have different interpretations. The wikipedia itself writes:

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

So even for a computational neuroscientist, the corresponding themes are mostly formulated uninherent from the standpoint of the observer.

Namelesss
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by Namelesss » January 15th, 2018, 9:59 pm

SimpleGuy wrote:
January 15th, 2018, 1:05 pm
Science can be proven or disproven via experimental data or logical deduction or computer investigation.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph, if I have to explain once more time how science does not 'prove' anything, I'm just going to start ignoring the ignorance.

Albert Einstein:
"No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong."
There is no 'proof', there is 'supportive data'!
Get it?
If not, get it! *__-
Philosophy states general conjectures within a human society or a single mind that emphasises, the view of a certain person on reality without beeing able to prove it. Philosophy is dependent on how people perceive something and with it can have different interpretations. The wikipedia itself writes:

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.
Wiki, huh...
Knowledge = experience!
I am a philosopher, I think philosophically, naturally. I do not need to imbibe someone's opinions (probably lacking actual experience/Knowledge) from Wiki.
You cannot Know heat unless you burn your finger! Reading Wiki articles is only an intellectual knowing of thoughts, not fire.
I'm well aware of the common, ancient, street level notions of philosophy.
As I said, usually not from philosophers.
Love of Wisdom, what does that even mean, if anything?!?
So even for a computational neuroscientist, the corresponding themes are mostly formulated uninherent from the standpoint of the observer.
There is no, never was, nor will be an "objective observer" (an obsolete and erroneous ideal of 'classical' science, if that's what you mean by 'uninherent')!
As far as 'inherent' there is not anything in existence that is not an inherent feature of the Universe/Reality!

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Atreyu
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by Atreyu » January 16th, 2018, 8:44 pm

No one in this thread has yet elucidated the key difference between philosophy and science.

In philosophy, one deals with ideas. The criteria for these ideas is that they have to be reasonable/logical, and can be defended intelligently, even if the subject matter is rather abstract.

In science, one deals with theories. These ideas have to be more precise and exact than philosophical ideas, because a sound philosophical concept cannot become a theory until it's made verifiable, and this requires it to be put in a form that can be tested. In other words, in science you have to back up your ideas with "the math", with calculations, and these calculations provide a means of experimentation.

For example, to say the Universe always existed, or to say that the Universe had a definite beginning, would be philosophy. There is no way to elucidat either position in a way in which it could become a theory, i.e. in a way in which it could be verified or tested. Science cannot shed any light on this question, therefore all we can do is to try and reason it out, i.e. philosophize about it.

To say that the Universe as we know it resulted from a 'Big Bang' which occurred about 13.7 billion years ago is science. This idea can be backed up by mathematical formula, it has complex calculations behind it, which enable it to be tested, even if we have no means to test for it at the present time, using our present technology. The point is that it could be tested, because it's a theory, i.e. it's precise and exact enough of an idea that its formulation could be verified or disproved by experience.

However, there is no way we could ever conduct any experiments to find out if the Universe had a beginning or not. No way to know what might have been before the Big Bang, if anything. This idea is too vague to be elucidated as a theory, hence its proper designation as a philosophical dilemma.

Burning ghost
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by Burning ghost » January 16th, 2018, 9:17 pm

Atreyu -

I did.

Science deals with perfecting the accuracy of "facts" and philosophy deals with perfecting ideas of "truth." They both necessarily cross over into each others domain.

If you follow it through it should be clear enough to see that more better grounded the facts the easier it becomes to delineate sets of rules and establish truths from them. Truth only has meaning within set parameters, and scientific investigation sets out more and more accurate and applicable parameters.
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Frewah
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by Frewah » October 31st, 2018, 4:51 pm

I can think of one big difference. There is a scientific method that is more rigid in science than in philosophy. Bryan Magee mentions what applies to philosophy which was very short. The ancient greek philosophers didn’t do experiments, I think they would snear at it.

There existed an idea that flies spawned spontaneously from rotten meat. It didn’t occur to those that came up with this idea that their reasoning could be flawed. Had they killed a rat maybe and put into something that could be sealed, they would have discovered that no flies would appear. I think it’s fair to say that science is more rigid than philosophy.

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SimpleGuy
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Re: What is the differences between philosophy and science?

Post by SimpleGuy » November 2nd, 2018, 7:13 am

The difference between philosophy and science is methaphisics, which is mostly nonexistent in science. The only science , that has a metaphysical aspect is psychology. Philosophy is man scentered and science is Observation and theory centered.

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