All Day I Hear- James Joyce

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Mayanka
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All Day I Hear- James Joyce

Post by Mayanka » October 1st, 2013, 11:59 pm

I'm looking to analyse it in a unique way.


All Day I Hear- James Joyce


All day I hear the noise of waters

Making moan,

Sad as the sea-bird is when, going

Forth alone,

He hears the winds cry to the water's

Monotone.


The grey winds, the cold winds are blowing

Where I go.

I hear the noise of many waters Far below.

All day, all night, I hear them flowing To and fro.

Dolphin42
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Re: All Day I Hear- James Joyce

Post by Dolphin42 » October 2nd, 2013, 6:24 am

Like a lot of people, I suspect, I have several works of James Joyce on my bookshelf and one day I'm definitely going to read one of them past the first page.

I've never heard this poem before and the first thing that strikes me is the contrast between black-and-white and full-colour. The winds are monotone and grey. But the sound of waves is white noise - i.e. full colour.

But that's probably too physicsy an interpretation. And even if it was the intention of the author, I can't see why.

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Dawson
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Re: All Day I Hear- James Joyce

Post by Dawson » October 2nd, 2013, 7:43 pm

All Day I Hear- James Joyce


All day I hear the noise of waters

Making moan,

Sad as the sea-bird is when, going

Forth alone,

He hears the winds cry to the water's

Monotone.


The grey winds, the cold winds are blowing

Where I go.

I hear the noise of many waters Far below.

All day, all night, I hear them flowing To and fro.
The first stanza of the poem evokes the loneliness and desolate beauty of the sea environment, the melancholy solitude of the sea-bird in the blind and ancient trinity of bird, water and wind. This is the macrocosm of waking life, pregnant with hidden danger.

The second stanza speaks of the journey down into the microcosm, falling in to the chasm of sleep, where the poet is followed by the echoes of the distant sea and hears the voice of the Unconscious "many waters Far below". The "flowing to and fro" is the underlying tapestry of both sleep and waking.

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Mawileonhihe
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Re: All Day I Hear- James Joyce

Post by Mawileonhihe » October 6th, 2013, 1:33 pm

It was the curry I tell you! :D

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Hereandnow
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Re: All Day I Hear- James Joyce

Post by Hereandnow » January 12th, 2014, 12:14 pm

Hmmmmm: First the word choice. this is obvoiusly not a celebration of the sea or any possible metaphorical interpretation. It is solitary and plaintive testament of one who is afficted and bears the suffering privately. the poem gives the reader a brief glimpse into the world of a abiding suffering and isolation. The poem is written in the third person and uses a variety of imagery, especially auditory imagery, to convey a sense of isolation and misery. The title's first words 'All day' suggests a condition that is continues without pause and is thus, in its constancy, uninterrupted in its effect on the poet. The poet imagines himself a seagull, a bird noted especially for its long excursions out to sea with the threat of not having enough strength to return. The sea itself is, of course, a standard symbol of the unknown, the abyssal, suggesting a lostness or an estrangement from the "shore" of engaging events. (The sea was for Melville's Ahab and dangerous place where the familiar, moral, structured world is abandoned for, if you will, evil possibilities beyond the grace of God.) For the seagull, the 'wind cries', the noise of the water 'moans' and the cold wind blows. Imagery here is clear: ........................Sorry, no time to finish. A little help?

-- Updated January 15th, 2014, 3:52 pm to add the following --
Hereandnow wrote:Hmmmmm: First this is a solitary and plaintive testament of one who is afficted and bears the suffering privately. the poem gives the reader a brief glimpse into the world of a abiding suffering and isolation. The poem is written in the third person and uses a variety of imagery, especially auditory imagery, to convey a sense of isolation and misery. The title's first words 'All day' suggests a condition that is continues without pause and is thus, in its constancy, uninterrupted in its effect on the poet. The poet imagines himself a seagull, a bird noted especially for its long excursions out to sea with the threat of not having enough strength to return. The sea itself is, of course, a standard symbol of the unknown, the abyssal, suggesting a lostness or an estrangement from the "shore" of engaging events. (The sea was for Melville's Ahab and dangerous place where the familiar, moral, structured world is abandoned for, if you will, evil possibilities beyond the grace of God.) For the seagull, the 'wind cries', the noise of the water 'moans' and the cold wind blows. Imagery here is clear: ........................Sorry, no time to finish. A little help?

-- Updated January 15th, 2014, 3:52 pm to add the following --
Hereandnow wrote:Hmmmmm: First this is a solitary and plaintive testament of one who is afficted and bears the suffering privately. the poem gives the reader a brief glimpse into the world of a abiding suffering and isolation. The poem is written in the third person and uses a variety of imagery, especially auditory imagery, to convey a sense of isolation and misery. The title's first words 'All day' suggests a condition that is continues without pause and is thus, in its constancy, uninterrupted in its effect on the poet. The poet imagines himself a seagull, a bird noted especially for its long excursions out to sea with the threat of not having enough strength to return. The sea itself is, of course, a standard symbol of the unknown, the abyssal, suggesting a lostness or an estrangement from the "shore" of engaging events. (The sea was for Melville's Ahab and dangerous place where the familiar, moral, structured world is abandoned for, if you will, evil possibilities beyond the grace of God.) For the seagull, the 'wind cries', the noise of the water 'moans' and the cold wind blows. Imagery here is clear: ........................Sorry, no time to finish. A little help?

-- Updated January 15th, 2014, 3:52 pm to add the following --
Hereandnow wrote:Hmmmmm: First this is a solitary and plaintive testament of one who is afficted and bears the suffering privately. the poem gives the reader a brief glimpse into the world of a abiding suffering and isolation. The poem is written in the third person and uses a variety of imagery, especially auditory imagery, to convey a sense of isolation and misery. The title's first words 'All day' suggests a condition that is continues without pause and is thus, in its constancy, uninterrupted in its effect on the poet. The poet imagines himself a seagull, a bird noted especially for its long excursions out to sea with the threat of not having enough strength to return. The sea itself is, of course, a standard symbol of the unknown, the abyssal, suggesting a lostness or an estrangement from the "shore" of engaging events. (The sea was for Melville's Ahab and dangerous place where the familiar, moral, structured world is abandoned for, if you will, evil possibilities beyond the grace of God.) For the seagull, the 'wind cries', the noise of the water 'moans' and the cold wind blows. Imagery here is clear: ........................Sorry, no time to finish. A little help?

-- Updated January 15th, 2014, 3:52 pm to add the following --
Hereandnow wrote:Hmmmmm: First this is a solitary and plaintive testament of one who is afficted and bears the suffering privately. the poem gives the reader a brief glimpse into the world of a abiding suffering and isolation. The poem is written in the third person and uses a variety of imagery, especially auditory imagery, to convey a sense of isolation and misery. The title's first words 'All day' suggests a condition that is continues without pause and is thus, in its constancy, uninterrupted in its effect on the poet. The poet imagines himself a seagull, a bird noted especially for its long excursions out to sea with the threat of not having enough strength to return. The sea itself is, of course, a standard symbol of the unknown, the abyssal, suggesting a lostness or an estrangement from the "shore" of engaging events. (The sea was for Melville's Ahab and dangerous place where the familiar, moral, structured world is abandoned for, if you will, evil possibilities beyond the grace of God.) For the seagull, the 'wind cries', the noise of the water 'moans' and the cold wind blows. Imagery here is clear: ........................Sorry, no time to finish. A little help?

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Edison Maxwell
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Re: All Day I Hear- James Joyce

Post by Edison Maxwell » November 4th, 2018, 12:23 pm

There's was a nice musical interpretation of this poem (Joyce was consciously writing lyrics during that time) by Jan Steele in 1976:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8SpYnYe77s

My interpretation is that the "seagull" flying above the "waters far below" is a metaphor for an individuated consciousness maneuvering, buffeted by "grey winds", while recognizing a deep ocean of subconsciousness - the "monotone" of "many waters" - far below.

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