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Languages That Can't be Bridged

Use this forum to have philosophical discussions about aesthetics and art. What is art? What is beauty? What makes art good? You can also use this forum to discuss philosophy in the arts, namely to discuss the philosophical points in any particular movie, TV show, book or story.
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XavierAlex
Posts: 307
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:56 am

Languages That Can't be Bridged

Post by XavierAlex » June 6th, 2012, 10:17 pm

In higher education, different branches of studies have some form of jargon or language: math, logic, science, philosophy, geology, etc. I come from the branch of art and even a subdivision of that. Now, none of the "linguistic models" is more true or more correct. But how can philosophy or criticism express what art expresses and vice versa? I don't think they can.

So the question is basic I'm guessing: how can any of the branches of studies truly bridge together and become unified? I'm guessing they cannot be bridged and unified.

A Poster He or I
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Joined: March 18th, 2011, 4:57 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Anaximander

Re: Languages That Can't be Bridged

Post by A Poster He or I » June 7th, 2012, 11:28 am

The great disciplines of human cognitive expression are complementary to each other. They are apples to oranges in both their implicit ontologies and their purpose as expressions of humanity. Imagine a polygon with each discipline being a facet of the whole. The whole requires all its facets to be whole, yet it is only the whole that is holding all those facets together. So the bridging and unification comes only a holistic fashion, not in any attempt to merge disciplines.

XavierAlex
Posts: 307
Joined: June 4th, 2012, 10:56 am

Re: Languages That Can't be Bridged

Post by XavierAlex » June 7th, 2012, 1:31 pm

A Poster He or I wrote:The great disciplines of human cognitive expression are complementary to each other. They are apples to oranges in both their implicit ontologies and their purpose as expressions of humanity. Imagine a polygon with each discipline being a facet of the whole. The whole requires all its facets to be whole, yet it is only the whole that is holding all those facets together. So the bridging and unification comes only a holistic fashion, not in any attempt to merge disciplines.
I think this may be true, if the disciplines were exact for everyone. Or perfect for everyone. But the polygon deflates, I think, because of the nature of one study over another, one discipline over another. What I am trying to say is that the image may be more of lines outward.

In your polygon example, I think, humans would know all disciplines and communicate or code-switch along the lines of each branch of study. But from my observations, someone who studies forestry isn't going to communicate anything else that they have not learned. If you haven't learned it, how can you express it?

The lines go outward as the esoteric knowledge is learned. The individual becomes more adept at fishing, but loses the ability to do calculus, without practice.

And so individuals, I wouldn't say, can reach a holism. Individuals can reach a broad understanding, but never express in all the various ways of cognitive expressiveness.

A Poster He or I
Posts: 1104
Joined: March 18th, 2011, 4:57 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Anaximander

Re: Languages That Can't be Bridged

Post by A Poster He or I » June 7th, 2012, 3:00 pm

I more-or-less agree with that. My polygon analogy was more of a detached, idealized way to think about things. It would be a real Renaissance-mind who could hold everything together and not bias their views by favoring one facet.

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