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What are the different types of altruism?

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Alias
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Re: What are the different types of altruism?

Post by Alias » January 12th, 2019, 3:20 am

boywonderlord wrote:
January 11th, 2019, 7:00 pm
I think its pretty easy to rationalize why a dog might dump a kibble in your lap, and I think its because your pup wants some food.
She had the food in her dish in the kitchen. She ran there from the living-room where I was sitting, picked up her dish, carried it to the living-room, directly to me and put it in my lap. It spilled, but that's not her fault.
Dogs are smart, but I don't think it would be smart to desire to make you feel better for no rational reason.
The smarts are about understanding human language a helluva lot better than we understand canine. The desire to make you feel better is empathy. I don't know whether you can call empathy rational, but it's certainly functional: it enables sentient beings to relate to one another in a mutually supportive and beneficial way. It works among members of the same species and also members of different species who care about one another.
Assuming your brain wasn't just fabricating a connection and your dog really could tell that you were sad,
I wasn't sad; I had just come off a long, productive day; had worked through lunch and was famished.
However, all dogs and most cats are aware of their humans' moods, and when they have a special relationship to one human, they're hyper-aware of that person's emotions. Also, dogs can smell chemical changes in the secretions of human skin. That's the principle behind helper dogs for people with MS or epilepsy.
In fact a study was released recently that dogs feel no guilt, they just fake it REALLY well in order to look even cuter and get more food.
Bull. Feathers.
Of course, if that were true, it would prove that dogs are more intelligent than humans, as we're rubbish at faking guilt. (Plus, we're already overfeeding pets, with no effort on their part.)
Everything serves a purpose, survival. Theres nothing wrong with the simple nature of every species, but I don't see a reason to try to make altruism more than it is.
It's not more than it is. It is just what it needs to be.
[/quote]Have you ever read Nietzsche's "genealogy of morality"? He paints a pretty sad picture of the whole "good-bad" equation, along with the "bad conscience". [/quote]
Poor unhappy bastard! Maybe if he'd had a dog...
I think many of us actively try to avoid for a skewered perspective
skewered? painful!
Maybe I'm just crazy?
Inexperienced, unobservant, limited, could use improvement in reading comprehension - sure. Crazy? Probably no more than most humans.
Perhaps there is more to this,
Yep.
Those who can induce you to believe absurdities can induce you to commit atrocities. - Voltaire

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boywonderlord
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Re: What are the different types of altruism?

Post by boywonderlord » January 12th, 2019, 5:29 pm

In regards to the first paragraph, that is not what empathy is.


Assuming your brain wasn't just fabricating a connection and your dog really could tell that you were sad,
I wasn't sad; I had just come off a long, productive day; had worked through lunch and was famished.
However, all dogs and most cats are aware of their humans' moods, and when they have a special relationship to one human, they're hyper-aware of that person's emotions. Also, dogs can smell chemical changes in the secretions of human skin. That's the principle behind helper dogs for people with MS or epilepsy.
You are specifically mentioning the use of the olfactory system here, which allows dogs to sense fear and happiness from their owner. From the small amount I have read on this topic, it doesn't seem to go much further than this, and the rest looks like speculation. I can give you some links if you want, as it seems you have yet to read anything on the topic either. I tried to look into "special relation to one human" hyper awareness regarding smells that relate to emotions and found nothing. I ended up talking to one of my friends working at a biology institute at the local campus and he says the entire thing smells of bad air, but its difficult to say due to the amount of animal lovers in the field. He pointed me to a couple of studies regarding some work done on cats detecting cancer, which turned out to be debunked. In the end if you can point me to something substantial, I would be happy to read it.
In fact a study was released recently that dogs feel no guilt, they just fake it REALLY well in order to look even cuter and get more food.
Bull. Feathers.
Of course, if that were true, it would prove that dogs are more intelligent than humans, as we're rubbish at faking guilt. (Plus, we're already overfeeding pets, with no effort on their part.)
First of all, calling bull feathers on a truth doesn't make it go away. Second of all, not experiencing an emotion makes you more intelligent? How does that make any sense. I used to fake guilt as a child before I knew what it was. Thirdly, in regards to its truth, if you just looked up "can dogs feel guilt", you would find plenty of valuable information on the topic. In general, most people believe dogs don't feel complex emotions, and we humans are just being overly imaginative. However, I can also point you to the studies that these articles originated from, if you want to argue that the internet isn't substantial enough.
Everything serves a purpose, survival. Theres nothing wrong with the simple nature of every species, but I don't see a reason to try to make altruism more than it is.
It's not more than it is. It is just what it needs to be.
I agree. You, however, are making it more than it is, and more than it needs to be.
Have you ever read Nietzsche's "genealogy of morality"? He paints a pretty sad picture of the whole "good-bad" equation, along with the "bad conscience".
Poor unhappy bastard! Maybe if he'd had a dog...
You even admit it :D Well, ignorance is bliss.
I think many of us actively try to avoid for a skewered perspective
skewered? painful!
Lazily typing out posts late at night while drunk does lead to spelling errors and poor formatting. Bad air! However, an uninformed view deserves an unedited response.
Maybe I'm just crazy?
Inexperienced, unobservant, limited, could use improvement in reading comprehension - sure. Crazy? Probably no more than most humans.
Well your father was a hamster and your mother smelt of ellberries!
Perhaps there is more to this,
Yep.
Honestly, whatever makes you happy man. I highly suggest you ignore all this rubbish. We are all hostage to our truths. If you have any studies to link me, I would love to read them. Otherwise, I say we call it a day, because I can see this drifting into an elongated clash of egos relatively quickly, like every discussion eventually does.

Also, could you tell me how one correctly quotes? Because I kinda screwed the pooch on these quotes.

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Re: What are the different types of altruism?

Post by Alias » January 12th, 2019, 6:55 pm

Lazily typing out posts late at night while drunk does lead to spelling errors and poor formatting. Bad air! However, an uninformed view deserves an unedited response.
Fair enough.

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KatarinaWoods
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Re: What are the different types of altruism?

Post by KatarinaWoods » January 22nd, 2019, 8:42 am

Altruism (lat. Alter) is a concept that is conceptualized by activity associated with the disinterested concern for the welfare of others; correlated with the concept of selflessness - that is addiction to the victims
In some ways it can be the opposite of egoism. In psychology, there is sometimes a synonym or part of prosocial behavior.
“No matter how egoistic a person may seem, there are clearly certain laws in his nature that make him interested in the fate of others and consider their happiness necessary for himself, although he himself receives nothing from this, except for the pleasure of seeing this happiness.”
- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments, 1759
In terms of anthropology
Marshal Moss in the book “The Gift” briefly described the evolution of the concept of alms (later developed into the concept of altruism) from the concept of sacrifice:
Charity is the fruit, on the one hand, of the moral concept of the gift, and on the other, of the concept of sacrifice. Generosity is an obligation, because Nemesis takes revenge on the abundance of wealth of prosperous people for the poor and gods, and the rich must get rid of it. This is the ancient morality of the gift, which became the principle of justice.I am now writing a lot of essay on altruism. Of course, my syllable is not the cleanest and sleekest, but here
] they help me. Ready to discuss everything on this topic.
main types, forms and practices of altruism
Moral and normative altruism
Altruism of sympathy and sympathy
Rational Altruism
Social psychology of altruism and altruistic behavior
Other varieties
In terms of anthropology
Evolutionary explanations

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