Ethics of helping a blind sibling

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Sculptor1
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Re: Ethics of helping a blind sibling

Post by Sculptor1 » September 9th, 2020, 4:56 pm

h_k_s wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 4:53 pm
Looks like @Sculptor1 made a comment of some kind in response to what I posted.

@Sculptor1 you already know that I muted you for violations of logic and clean debate. So you don't need to quote me. I don't respond to you.
Looks like h_k_s is continuing to be utterly irrelevant

Ecurb
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Re: Ethics of helping a blind sibling

Post by Ecurb » September 9th, 2020, 6:17 pm

h_k_s wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 4:52 pm


So at the very least tell us your version's name, such as KJV, or YLT, etc.

It matters.

I own an Authorized (King James) version. I'm not sure why you think accurate translation is so important. Isn't evocative, literate language equally important, to those of us who aren't Fundamentalists? I like the old--fashioned language of the Authorized translation because I imagine the Hebrews of 3000 years ago spoke in old-fashioned Hebrew.

Translation is a large and complicated subject. I was just reading a review of Elena Ferrante's new novel that claimed that the English translation is BETTER than the Italian. IN any event, language the evokes a similar emotional response as the original may be as "good" a translation as one that is more literally accurate. I'm not familiar with the YLT.

If Bob is smart, he will give away everything he owns and follow Jesus, for "It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God." (KJV) Of course people who quote this line forget the follow-up, where Jesus says, "With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible." Clearly, the difficulty of fitting a camel through the eye of a needle, neat trick though it may be, pales in comparison to entering the kingdom of God. So I'm not sure Bob can take any advice from Matthew 19.

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h_k_s
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Re: Ethics of helping a blind sibling

Post by h_k_s » September 10th, 2020, 1:13 pm

Ecurb wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 6:17 pm
h_k_s wrote:
September 9th, 2020, 4:52 pm


So at the very least tell us your version's name, such as KJV, or YLT, etc.

It matters.

I own an Authorized (King James) version. I'm not sure why you think accurate translation is so important. Isn't evocative, literate language equally important, to those of us who aren't Fundamentalists? I like the old--fashioned language of the Authorized translation because I imagine the Hebrews of 3000 years ago spoke in old-fashioned Hebrew.

Translation is a large and complicated subject. I was just reading a review of Elena Ferrante's new novel that claimed that the English translation is BETTER than the Italian. IN any event, language the evokes a similar emotional response as the original may be as "good" a translation as one that is more literally accurate. I'm not familiar with the YLT.

If Bob is smart, he will give away everything he owns and follow Jesus, for "It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God." (KJV) Of course people who quote this line forget the follow-up, where Jesus says, "With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible." Clearly, the difficulty of fitting a camel through the eye of a needle, neat trick though it may be, pales in comparison to entering the kingdom of God. So I'm not sure Bob can take any advice from Matthew 19.
KJV has the most translation errors of any.

Ecurb
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Re: Ethics of helping a blind sibling

Post by Ecurb » September 10th, 2020, 8:54 pm

Translation is an interesting topic. In sonme literary circles, the translator is considered a "co-author". For anyone who is interested, here's a link to a Tim Parks article in "New York Review of Books". I haven't reread it, but noticed it when it came out because I've read several of Parks's books (mainly travel books about Italy, -- he's and Englishman who has taught in Milan for decades, and translated both into and from Italian. https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2019/09/1 ... -our-time/


"Errors" in biblical translation are, I suppose, anethema to devout Christians and Jews. But how does one translate a psalm? Poetry cannot be paraphrased. It depends on the SOUNDS of words, and also on hints of meaning not found in Webster. The KJ psalms sound pretty good to me. Co-authors?

We're getting away from Bob and his blind relatives, but when I was in Grad School (cultural anthropology) one of my mentors was a Harvard man who was the only white man (and one of only a few living humans) to speak Pima and Papago (two languages of people native to southern Arizona). He wrote books with the phonetically transcribed original on one page (these were not written languages), and on the facing page his translation into English. He believed (as is a common issue in cultural anthropology) that (per Sapir/Whorf) "language has a tyranny on thought". So such features of language as tenses, genders, ways of speaking about the future and the past, etc. are essential to the "meaning" of things to Native Speakers. Unfortunarely, his translations, which were so literal that words were out of their normal order, sentences were non-existant, and, in general, the English was completely incomprehnsible to any but the most dedicated English readers.

Ecurb
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Joined: May 9th, 2012, 3:13 pm

Re: Ethics of helping a blind sibling

Post by Ecurb » September 10th, 2020, 9:05 pm

Sorry for the last "sentence", but the meaning is clear.

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