Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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Sushan
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Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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This topic is related to the philosophical book for the month of June Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power by Barbara Galutia Regis PA-C

https://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelv ... ?id=419391


Following quote which is found in Location 157 shows the author's view on the job of a Family Physician.
Family Practice—cradle to grave—is my specialty.
Do you agree with this statement, naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver? Why?
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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Sushan wrote: June 2nd, 2021, 11:51 am This topic is related to the philosophical book for the month of June Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power by Barbara Galutia Regis PA-C

https://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelv ... ?id=419391


Following quote which is found in Location 157 shows the author's view on the job of a Family Physician.
Family Practice—cradle to grave—is my specialty.
Do you agree with this statement, naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver? Why?
They can be. The real questions are: do they want to be? And as Dirty Harry put it: "A man's gotta know his limitations". That is, you need to know what you don't know and refer the patient to someone who is more knowledgeable than you are.
"As usual... it depends."
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Sushan
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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LuckyR wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 2:14 am
Sushan wrote: June 2nd, 2021, 11:51 am This topic is related to the philosophical book for the month of June Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power by Barbara Galutia Regis PA-C

https://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelv ... ?id=419391


Following quote which is found in Location 157 shows the author's view on the job of a Family Physician.
Family Practice—cradle to grave—is my specialty.
Do you agree with this statement, naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver? Why?
They can be. The real questions are: do they want to be? And as Dirty Harry put it: "A man's gotta know his limitations". That is, you need to know what you don't know and refer the patient to someone who is more knowledgeable than you are.
Exactly. As the family physicians are doctors with a basic degree ( though some are specialists in the field of family medicine, still they are not specialists in various fields in medicine) their knowledge and skills can be limited. And it is not something to be shamed of because no one can know everything. But it is of utmost importance to know one's limitations and whenever a patient's condition seems out of scope of a family physician, he should refer the patient without any hesitations because what is at risk is nothing else but a human life.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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Sushan wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 2:55 am
LuckyR wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 2:14 am
Sushan wrote: June 2nd, 2021, 11:51 am This topic is related to the philosophical book for the month of June Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power by Barbara Galutia Regis PA-C

https://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelv ... ?id=419391


Following quote which is found in Location 157 shows the author's view on the job of a Family Physician.
Family Practice—cradle to grave—is my specialty.
Do you agree with this statement, naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver? Why?
They can be. The real questions are: do they want to be? And as Dirty Harry put it: "A man's gotta know his limitations". That is, you need to know what you don't know and refer the patient to someone who is more knowledgeable than you are.
Exactly. As the family physicians are doctors with a basic degree ( though some are specialists in the field of family medicine, still they are not specialists in various fields in medicine) their knowledge and skills can be limited. And it is not something to be shamed of because no one can know everything. But it is of utmost importance to know one's limitations and whenever a patient's condition seems out of scope of a family physician, he should refer the patient without any hesitations because what is at risk is nothing else but a human life.
We are in agreement, though as background information: General Practice doesn't require a residency (for additional training) and is essentially an archaic term since just about all Primary practitioners do a residency in the field of Family Practice or Internal Medicine (which are more similar than different).
"As usual... it depends."
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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To me, cradle-to-grave caregiver means that she can provide care to anyone at any stage of life. I like that idea and I feel it shows her compassion to her fellow man.
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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Yes I definitely do.
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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hispoiema wrote: June 4th, 2021, 5:27 pm To me, cradle-to-grave caregiver means that she can provide care to anyone at any stage of life. I like that idea and I feel it shows her compassion to her fellow man.
That's all well and good but it's routine primary care, is there something special we're discussing?
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Re: Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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Maybe she was referring to the fact that she treats all life stages, however, she could have used other terms such as general practitioner or doctor for all phases of life. I understood cradle to grave to mean that she cares for individuals since birth to the day they die. Or that she helps them being born and being buried. Therefore, I personally would have used another term. On the positive side however, describing a general practitioner in this way does make it seem more dramatic and gets the point across that she has no preference for any age or life stage.
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Re: Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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ReaderAisha2020 wrote: June 7th, 2021, 4:14 pm Maybe she was referring to the fact that she treats all life stages, however, she could have used other terms such as general practitioner or doctor for all phases of life. I understood cradle to grave to mean that she cares for individuals since birth to the day they die. Or that she helps them being born and being buried. Therefore, I personally would have used another term. On the positive side however, describing a general practitioner in this way does make it seem more dramatic and gets the point across that she has no preference for any age or life stage.
There is a need for those who know a little bit about many subjects and for those who know a lot about fewer subjects. One is not superior to the other.
"As usual... it depends."
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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hispoiema wrote: June 4th, 2021, 5:27 pm To me, cradle-to-grave caregiver means that she can provide care to anyone at any stage of life. I like that idea and I feel it shows her compassion to her fellow man.
Actually a doctor with a MBBS (or an equivalent) can treat many general conditions of patients in any age group. But when someone choose family practice, as the name implies, it is a care for a family (families). So the physician will look after all the family members starting from the infant to the old ones. In many occasions these doctors are based on one location and throughout their service they remain there. So they see many life stages of the family members that they treat.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Sushan
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Re: Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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ReaderAisha2020 wrote: June 7th, 2021, 4:14 pm Maybe she was referring to the fact that she treats all life stages, however, she could have used other terms such as general practitioner or doctor for all phases of life. I understood cradle to grave to mean that she cares for individuals since birth to the day they die. Or that she helps them being born and being buried. Therefore, I personally would have used another term. On the positive side however, describing a general practitioner in this way does make it seem more dramatic and gets the point across that she has no preference for any age or life stage.
I agree. Many terms would have been used to give a similar meaning but this one is quite dramatic and it can be interpreted in several ways as you suggested. Although with today's busy world the traditional family physician's role also a bit changed, it used to be the doctor to be treated as one of the family members with all the house calls and all the family members going to see him for all their illnesses. With today's busy life style such bonds are weakened.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Do you agree with the author?

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Sushan wrote: June 9th, 2021, 7:39 am
hispoiema wrote: June 4th, 2021, 5:27 pm To me, cradle-to-grave caregiver means that she can provide care to anyone at any stage of life. I like that idea and I feel it shows her compassion to her fellow man.
Actually a doctor with a MBBS (or an equivalent) can treat many general conditions of patients in any age group. But when someone choose family practice, as the name implies, it is a care for a family (families). So the physician will look after all the family members starting from the infant to the old ones. In many occasions these doctors are based on one location and throughout their service they remain there. So they see many life stages of the family members that they treat.
Sure they're trained to treat all ages, but it is common for many to choose not to. In order to do uncomplicated deliveries of newborns, for example, requires being available 24/7 (instead of just office hours for someone with an office based practice). The vast majority of FPs choose not to work on Labor and Delivery and who can blame them. It is a highly litigious practice that, to be honest, is not suited to most personalities.

Similarly a lot of FPs hate doing pediatrics, even though they have some training in it, because dealing with other people's children drives many people (of every profession) crazy and they hate it.
"As usual... it depends."
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Re: Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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I like the term and think it conveys her message clearly. I have never heard it referred to like this - I think it’s a great way to let potential patients know she sees all ages. I have encountered many Family Practice offices that will not see children under 12 or anyone under 18. That’s not a family practice, that’s a general practice. I wish I could have found a true family practice when my child was younger.
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Re: Do you agree with the author about naming a family physician as a Cradle to Grave Caregiver?

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T_Van_B wrote: June 13th, 2021, 9:47 pm I like the term and think it conveys her message clearly. I have never heard it referred to like this - I think it’s a great way to let potential patients know she sees all ages. I have encountered many Family Practice offices that will not see children under 12 or anyone under 18. That’s not a family practice, that’s a general practice. I wish I could have found a true family practice when my child was younger.
Nope, as mentioned FPs choosing not to do Pediatrics is common. If that's not what you're interested in, great, choose an FP who does. Simple, really.
"As usual... it depends."
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