Surviving the Business of Healthcare - Reviews

Use this forum to discuss the June 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power by Barbara Galutia Regis PA-C
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Rituanand
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Surviving the Business of Healthcare - Reviews

Post by Rituanand »

This book is a good book about increasing one’s awareness about the practice of medicine these days and helps one understand what is essentially motivating insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies and the service providers. Changing times have caused medical professionals to ‘react’ and even though their intentions may be to do good for their community, their unnecessary ordering of tests, for instance and adding to financial burden of consumers, are driven by the fear of malpractice lawsuits. We, as a society, have become less tolerant towards each other and have become highly litigious. Notwithstanding that, consumers need to treat health professionals as business owners, selling them one or the other service, and consumers need to take charge of their own lives. The author points out a few useful website addresses.
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Sushan
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

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Rituanand wrote: June 2nd, 2021, 6:00 pm This book is a good book about increasing one’s awareness about the practice of medicine these days and helps one understand what is essentially motivating insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies and the service providers. Changing times have caused medical professionals to ‘react’ and even though their intentions may be to do good for their community, their unnecessary ordering of tests, for instance and adding to financial burden of consumers, are driven by the fear of malpractice lawsuits. We, as a society, have become less tolerant towards each other and have become highly litigious. Notwithstanding that, consumers need to treat health professionals as business owners, selling them one or the other service, and consumers need to take charge of their own lives. The author points out a few useful website addresses.
Quite true. Medicine and related practices have been converted from a service to a business. Though the ability to maintain it as service is still there, doctors and other para medical staff need to react to the fast changing current world systems. And with all these healthcare has become a very profitable business. It was well proven with the currently ongoing Covid Pandemic.

And as common to any system, there are enough frauds and malpractitioners in this field too. So the patients too have a responsibility and also a right to be knowledgeable about the services that they get, to whom they pay and how much.
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LuckyR
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

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Well caveat emptor has been in English law since 1603. By all means educate yourself.
"As usual... it depends."
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Sushan
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

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LuckyR wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 2:25 am Well caveat emptor has been in English law since 1603. By all means educate yourself.
I am not a law expert, and from what I read about this law it is applicable for buying goods. But can it be applied when buying a service as well? Are there no laws that will protect the buyer, because it is obvious in many case scenarios that there is a high chance for the buyer to be oblivious about the defects of what he buy because of having no mean to check it.

E.g.:- A buyer cannot check each and every function of a laptop before buying it, and he may find something not working after going home. Can the seller show this law and let the buyer suffer?
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Akgreat82
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

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Healthcarel profession renders services that directly impact on human well-being, it's a profession that demands sound ethical practice because it's deals with human lives and those in the profession are expected to seen genuinely caring for their customers.

Be that as it may, there is also the need for the healthcare professionals to be adequately taken care of, so there a thing line between healthcare as a service and it being a business outfit.
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

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Hopefully healtcare as a service doesn't use healthcare as a business, to provide enough healthcare consumers, for later healthcare service.
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Sushan
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

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Akgreat82 wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 7:20 am Healthcarel profession renders services that directly impact on human well-being, it's a profession that demands sound ethical practice because it's deals with human lives and those in the profession are expected to seen genuinely caring for their customers.

Be that as it may, there is also the need for the healthcare professionals to be adequately taken care of, so there a thing line between healthcare as a service and it being a business outfit.
I agree. There are rules and regulations as well as ethical practices that are related to medical services not only because it is a noble service, but also because it deals with human lives and emotions. But at most occasions people do not think about this service provider. How hard he has to work, how difficult it is to spend sleepless nights, how difficult it is to be without food and water not because of anything but of lack of time. So it is of utmost importance to take care of the service providers for the continuation of the services in a good standard.
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LuckyR
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Re: Healthcare as a Service vs Healthcare as a Business - Review

Post by LuckyR »

Sushan wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 3:05 am
LuckyR wrote: June 3rd, 2021, 2:25 am Well caveat emptor has been in English law since 1603. By all means educate yourself.
I am not a law expert, and from what I read about this law it is applicable for buying goods. But can it be applied when buying a service as well? Are there no laws that will protect the buyer, because it is obvious in many case scenarios that there is a high chance for the buyer to be oblivious about the defects of what he buy because of having no mean to check it.

E.g.:- A buyer cannot check each and every function of a laptop before buying it, and he may find something not working after going home. Can the seller show this law and let the buyer suffer?
As you and others note, medicine has professional standards of practice and is regulated by the government through medical boards. Unlike your car mechanic. Thus there many more avenues for patients to seek redress on the medical care they receive compared to other services. Though in concept it is no different than the routine caution any consumer uses in the marketplace. Thus why the advice in the book is likely of some value, but shouldn't suprise hardly anyone.
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Re: Surviving the Business of Healthcare - Review

Post by AverageBozo »

Rituanand wrote: June 2nd, 2021, 6:00 pm This book is a good book about increasing one’s awareness about the practice of medicine these days and helps one understand what is essentially motivating insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies and the service providers. Changing times have caused medical professionals to ‘react’ and even though their intentions may be to do good for their community, their unnecessary ordering of tests, for instance and adding to financial burden of consumers, are driven by the fear of malpractice lawsuits. We, as a society, have become less tolerant towards each other and have become highly litigious. Notwithstanding that, consumers need to treat health professionals as business owners, selling them one or the other service, and consumers need to take charge of their own lives. The author points out a few useful website addresses.
Good points, R. Thanks for your input. I would like to offer one amendment. Unnecessary tests are a thing of the past. Tests are ordered according to specific criteria, namely the Best Practice Guidelines, which are established by Medicare/Medicaid and are followed by private insurance companies in determining reimbursement pay payment.

Thank you, again, for your interesting post.
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Re: Surviving the Business of Healthcare - Review

Post by hispoiema »

What I enjoyed about the book is how the author draws you in with her heartfelt compassion for her patients and also shares her personal and unexpected experience with her own cancer. It was interesting learning her story of being a fourth-generation healthcare worker within her own family and heartwarming to hear about her life growing up in a small town. I found that the book really flows and keeps you interested. :-)
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heyhi1234
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An informative practical pocket guide

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This book was very simple, direct, down to earth, very informative and written in easy layman’s terms. There are many personal stories that were interesting but the pictures were difficult to make out, and there were minor grammatical issues that an editor should have caught. It got more interesting after about chapter 7 as the pace caught up with the subject of the title. Definitely directed towards non-medical people and patients and family and caregivers in particular, who want to learn more about advocating for themselves. Contains helpful suggestions and historic insight about the various different medical workers and what they do. Information about the unfair monopolies so prevalent insurance companies and pharmacies, BigPharma. Provides insight into the how doctor's and their staff must maintain extremely strict impartial confidentiality even in the most horrible life situations and even if they are also friends and neighbors of their patients. Provides some insight on treatment alternatives that are not always considered nor even common knowledge.
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Akaaiakamanu
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Surviving the Business of Healthcare -- I found this book to be very interesting...

Post by Akaaiakamanu »

I found this book to be very interesting. I am also a healthcare worker but to see the viewpoint of someone else is always enlightening. Regis really explains her position well as not only a PA but also a patient. This book is a quick and easy read packed with a lot of good information and insight.
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KP1728
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Review of Surviving the Business of Healthcare

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This book serves as a great guide to the inside world of healthcare and the medical community. Dr. Regis details her story of going from doctor to cancer patient. The book explains the loopholes in the healthcare industry and the changing dynamic of putting profits over people. Dr. Regis tells of her childhood growing up in a small town with doctors in her family spanning generations.

Dr. Regis also gives insight into the patient-doctor relationship to ensure the best care for the patient. In the book, it gives an overview of some ways to save money, either through shopping around for cheaper prescriptions or through health insurance without sacrificing your health and well-being. It also details how you have to be your own best advocate and get several opinions because no one knows your body better than you.

Surviving the business of healthcare is a great guide to understand the basics of the healthcare industry. From picking your team of healthcare professionals, saving on prescriptions and health insurance, advocating for your health and more. If you feel overwhelmed about certain aspects centered around your health, this book may answer several of your questions.

Rating-3/4
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nicolesnutter
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Re: Review of Surviving the Business of Healthcare

Post by nicolesnutter »

I'm excited to read this book, I'm currently one chapter 4, so far so good! I know I'm going to learn a lot from this story!
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ZombiellaBee
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Re: Surviving the Business of Healthcare - Review

Post by ZombiellaBee »

The book definitely reminds people to look after themselves and do their research when it comes to looking for the best care. The author gives good advice that might seem like common sense, but some people forget about doing their research and end up losing out on benefits when they could be saving money.

For someone who is already familiar with doing their own research and doing the best they can to benefit from the system, this is nothing new. A majority of the book is just past experiences and scenarios.

Health care can be pricey, but in emergencies it is a money saver. The struggle is juggling between paying a large amount of money now and never needing insurance to step in for a disaster, or not having insurance, but a medical emergency happens and drowns a person's lifesavings. Unfortunately, the Medicare system has no middle ground.
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