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Paradise and pre-mortality

Discuss philosophical questions regarding theism (and atheism), and discuss religion as it relates to philosophy. This includes any philosophical discussions that happen to be about god, gods, or a 'higher power' or the belief of them. This also generally includes philosophical topics about organized or ritualistic mysticism or about organized, common or ritualistic beliefs in the existence of supernatural phenomenon.
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Burning ghost
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Joined: February 27th, 2016, 3:10 am

Re: Paradise and pre-mortality

Post by Burning ghost » November 2nd, 2017, 2:42 am

As a story laid out in the context of a religious ideology we have to assume it from that stand point first of all. Prior to that is what interests me more.

The viewing of faces on Mars is understood because we now know we have an innate (built-in) neural network for facial recognition. The same goes for snakes, teeth and other such potential dangers. Combine this with the understanding of facing up to a threat and gaining knowledge I think it is clear enough that regardless of the intended message there is an underlying biological mechanism that pushed the fashioning of the story in this or that form. Given also that many mythos has relations to altered states of consciousness (be it physiologically induced and/or pushed by pharmaceutical means) there are other quite common themes in these areas that hold relation to the way mythos is presented and explained to others (in many cases likely from induced psychosis.)

In this respect I could equally say that the story of Eden could represent a certain understanding of mortality and the need to move forward rather than reside in the past. The need to face a challenge no matter how dangerous in order to reap some reward. A life without risk is no life at all. Immortality is nothing but some place devoid of emotional intent. In a way I would regard it as the ultimate horror of horrors.

We could also say that the richness of the story itself is the very reason it survives and if its riches become exhausted it will fade to nothing or take on a newer, fresher, or more appropriate form for the time.
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Whitedragon
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Joined: November 14th, 2012, 12:12 pm

Re: Paradise and pre-mortality

Post by Whitedragon » November 2nd, 2017, 3:21 am

Burning ghost wrote:As a story laid out in the context of a religious ideology we have to assume it from that stand point first of all. Prior to that is what interests me more.

The viewing of faces on Mars is understood because we now know we have an innate (built-in) neural network for facial recognition. The same goes for snakes, teeth and other such potential dangers. Combine this with the understanding of facing up to a threat and gaining knowledge I think it is clear enough that regardless of the intended message there is an underlying biological mechanism that pushed the fashioning of the story in this or that form. Given also that many mythos has relations to altered states of consciousness (be it physiologically induced and/or pushed by pharmaceutical means) there are other quite common themes in these areas that hold relation to the way mythos is presented and explained to others (in many cases likely from induced psychosis.)

In this respect I could equally say that the story of Eden could represent a certain understanding of mortality and the need to move forward rather than reside in the past. The need to face a challenge no matter how dangerous in order to reap some reward. A life without risk is no life at all. Immortality is nothing but some place devoid of emotional intent. In a way I would regard it as the ultimate horror of horrors.

We could also say that the richness of the story itself is the very reason it survives and if its riches become exhausted it will fade to nothing or take on a newer, fresher, or more appropriate form for the time.
I look at the vampire stories I can't but help recognizing the deprived emotions and pain that goes along with it. What does one do having an immortal life? If there is no greater prospect of the general lives we face here on earth, I can't imagine how it could be beneficial. Many people get frustrated, because their lives have no meaning: they can't develop their talents, they can't affect the world around them. Immortality only makes sense if we could have an environment adjusted to meet our immortal needs.
We are a frozen spirit; our thoughts a cloud of droplets; different oceans and ages brood inside – where spirit sublimates. To some our words, an acid rain, to some it is too pure, to some infectious, to some a cure.

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