The March Philosophy Book of the Month is Final Notice by Van Fleisher. Discuss Final Notice now.

The April Philosophy Book of the Month is The Unbound Soul by Richard L. Haight. Discuss The Unbound Soul Now

The May Philosophy Book of the Month is Misreading Judas by Robert Wahler.

Moral Faith and the Highest Good

Discuss philosophical questions regarding theism (and atheism), and discuss religion as it relates to philosophy. This includes any philosophical discussions that happen to be about god, gods, or a 'higher power' or the belief of them. This also generally includes philosophical topics about organized or ritualistic mysticism or about organized, common or ritualistic beliefs in the existence of supernatural phenomenon.
Post Reply
User avatar
Wesgtr
New Trial Member
Posts: 19
Joined: December 28th, 2017, 3:41 pm

Moral Faith and the Highest Good

Post by Wesgtr » January 12th, 2020, 9:21 pm

Moral Faith and the Highest Good: Kant's Critical Philosophy

My understanding of Kant through a recent source, and my own readings, is that he has a crucial idea of ‘moral faith’. It is crucial for the entire critical system. Kant introduces the idea that the ‘highest good’ must be attained, but in order for it to be possessed one must postulate it. In order for it to be sought, it must postulated ‘a priori’. By ‘a priori’, a few things may be meant, yet I subscribe to the ‘tacit knowledge’ version of it, suggesting that by the reasonable fact that knowledge is innate. I would say in line with others Kant was Platonic in that knowledge is discoverable: it is built in at least to a degree, and it pertains to our knowledge of other things. For example, universal laws of nature for the sake of mathematics and science. This would give an important place to mathematics and science. Yet, what my interests lend me to is the necessity of ‘moral faith’ for his entire system. He would say that everyone follows the ‘moral law’ and that because of this law we are required to ‘do unto others’ to some degree. For me, It is a little cloudy after the part about everybody: he does say, however, that Christians believe further than simply the laws of morality. So, I found that pretty interesting, reminding me of a dream I had as a child, in which I discussed with my dad the philosophical ideas I had and that they could relate to some sort of helpful system.

User avatar
h_k_s
Posts: 969
Joined: November 25th, 2018, 12:09 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Aristotle
Location: Rocky Mountains

Re: Moral Faith and the Highest Good

Post by h_k_s » January 12th, 2020, 10:14 pm

Wesgtr wrote:
January 12th, 2020, 9:21 pm
Moral Faith and the Highest Good: Kant's Critical Philosophy

My understanding of Kant through a recent source, and my own readings, is that he has a crucial idea of ‘moral faith’. It is crucial for the entire critical system. Kant introduces the idea that the ‘highest good’ must be attained, but in order for it to be possessed one must postulate it. In order for it to be sought, it must postulated ‘a priori’. By ‘a priori’, a few things may be meant, yet I subscribe to the ‘tacit knowledge’ version of it, suggesting that by the reasonable fact that knowledge is innate. I would say in line with others Kant was Platonic in that knowledge is discoverable: it is built in at least to a degree, and it pertains to our knowledge of other things. For example, universal laws of nature for the sake of mathematics and science. This would give an important place to mathematics and science. Yet, what my interests lend me to is the necessity of ‘moral faith’ for his entire system. He would say that everyone follows the ‘moral law’ and that because of this law we are required to ‘do unto others’ to some degree. For me, It is a little cloudy after the part about everybody: he does say, however, that Christians believe further than simply the laws of morality. So, I found that pretty interesting, reminding me of a dream I had as a child, in which I discussed with my dad the philosophical ideas I had and that they could relate to some sort of helpful system.
Aristotle's definition of it is/was "the magnanimous man." I'm sure you have heard of it also.

User avatar
Terrapin Station
Posts: 601
Joined: August 23rd, 2016, 3:00 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Bertrand Russell and WVO Quine
Location: NYC Man

Re: Moral Faith and the Highest Good

Post by Terrapin Station » January 13th, 2020, 4:37 am

I'm not sure what you want us to address here, Wesgtr. It reads kind of like loosely structured "notes to oneself."

User avatar
h_k_s
Posts: 969
Joined: November 25th, 2018, 12:09 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Aristotle
Location: Rocky Mountains

Re: Moral Faith and the Highest Good

Post by h_k_s » January 14th, 2020, 7:13 am

Terrapin Station wrote:
January 13th, 2020, 4:37 am
I'm not sure what you want us to address here, Wesgtr. It reads kind of like loosely structured "notes to oneself."
Yup. Seems so.

Post Reply