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Religion vs. Philosophy

Discuss philosophical questions regarding theism (and atheism), and discuss religion as it relates to philosophy. This includes any philosophical discussions that happen to be about god, gods, or a 'higher power' or the belief of them. This also generally includes philosophical topics about organized or ritualistic mysticism or about organized, common or ritualistic beliefs in the existence of supernatural phenomenon.
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Name Is Unnecessary
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Re: Religion vs. Philosophy

Post by Name Is Unnecessary » May 21st, 2018, 6:08 am

Religion as "a set of beliefs which explains how the world came to be and so, so..." I can imagine was inspired by man's dislike for being ignorant - ancients could not explain this and that, so they created epic stories to fill the gaps. One epic story explains why it rains, another epic story explains how that mountain appeared.

Most people today (and I) regard myths as allegory, but it is certainly the case that the majority in the past regarded them literal, least because even nowadays some see them as literal stories. But I am unsure about something: did myths form as allegorical stories, which were taken literally? I am unsure because my confused eye sees too many metaphors and analogies in myths (of course, my eye). Of course, if this can be answered, it would be very hard - myths do not have a single author.

For philosophy, I really can't view its sole purpose as truth-seeker. As much as I read works of philosophy, I only see centuries old concepts looked at from a different angle. Yes, there are some fundamental ideas born by it, but they are really few - whether you like the next words or not, I perceive a big part of philosophy, mostly idealism, as subjective. This of course is a subjective thought coming from a mind, which like all minds, has bias.

barata
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Re: Religion vs. Philosophy

Post by barata » December 6th, 2018, 12:09 pm

Philosophy, whilst it still has its authorities does not base its conclusions soley or even mainly upon the thoughts of those but rather on logic and rational argument.

Whilst few christians for example would argue that Jesus got it wrong Philosophers take delight in pulling the ideas and theories of its heroes, Socrates for example, to bits.

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LuckyR
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Re: Religion vs. Philosophy

Post by LuckyR » December 9th, 2018, 3:09 am

Name Is Unnecessary wrote:
May 21st, 2018, 6:08 am
Religion as "a set of beliefs which explains how the world came to be and so, so..." I can imagine was inspired by man's dislike for being ignorant - ancients could not explain this and that, so they created epic stories to fill the gaps. One epic story explains why it rains, another epic story explains how that mountain appeared.

Most people today (and I) regard myths as allegory, but it is certainly the case that the majority in the past regarded them literal, least because even nowadays some see them as literal stories. But I am unsure about something: did myths form as allegorical stories, which were taken literally? I am unsure because my confused eye sees too many metaphors and analogies in myths (of course, my eye). Of course, if this can be answered, it would be very hard - myths do not have a single author.

For philosophy, I really can't view its sole purpose as truth-seeker. As much as I read works of philosophy, I only see centuries old concepts looked at from a different angle. Yes, there are some fundamental ideas born by it, but they are really few - whether you like the next words or not, I perceive a big part of philosophy, mostly idealism, as subjective. This of course is a subjective thought coming from a mind, which like all minds, has bias.
In my opinion it started like this, some guy is smarter than average and a better storyteller than average and he makes up an allegorical story, tells said story and is initially surprised that a portion of the rabble take it literally. He runs with the literal angle and poof religion is born/invented. The guy becomes a leader and reaps the rewards that leaders get, so he is motivated to come up with more and better stories. Fast forward to today.
"As usual... it depends."

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