Lack of citations, is it okay for a practical guide?

Use this forum to discuss the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD
Post Reply
User avatar
Sushan
Book of the Month Discussion Leader
Posts: 587
Joined: February 19th, 2021, 8:12 pm
Contact:

Lack of citations, is it okay for a practical guide?

Post by Sushan »

This topic is about the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD


The book is written by professionals, and I am sure they had no intention of providing false information. Yet I found it quite unusual for this book to have no citations at all. Maybe the authors thought to keep this book as a practical guide for the common people, and thought not to include citations. But I think the citations would have increased the credibility of the book.

What do you think? Is it okay for practical guides to not have citations? How can the reader be sure about the content and provided information?
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
User avatar
LuckyR
Moderator
Posts: 5771
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 1:16 am

Re: Lack of citations, is it okay for a practical guide?

Post by LuckyR »

Sushan wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 7:16 am This topic is about the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD


The book is written by professionals, and I am sure they had no intention of providing false information. Yet I found it quite unusual for this book to have no citations at all. Maybe the authors thought to keep this book as a practical guide for the common people, and thought not to include citations. But I think the citations would have increased the credibility of the book.

What do you think? Is it okay for practical guides to not have citations? How can the reader be sure about the content and provided information?
There are several ways of looking at this topic. Certainly I would fault the authors if they write: many studies show... Yet cite no studies. Or if they imply a controversial opinion is correct, yet don't explain why. OTOH it would not be unreasonable to say anecdotally that this or that technique works in my experience.
"As usual... it depends."
User avatar
Sushan
Book of the Month Discussion Leader
Posts: 587
Joined: February 19th, 2021, 8:12 pm
Contact:

Re: Lack of citations, is it okay for a practical guide?

Post by Sushan »

LuckyR wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 4:48 pm
Sushan wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 7:16 am This topic is about the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD


The book is written by professionals, and I am sure they had no intention of providing false information. Yet I found it quite unusual for this book to have no citations at all. Maybe the authors thought to keep this book as a practical guide for the common people, and thought not to include citations. But I think the citations would have increased the credibility of the book.

What do you think? Is it okay for practical guides to not have citations? How can the reader be sure about the content and provided information?
There are several ways of looking at this topic. Certainly I would fault the authors if they write: many studies show... Yet cite no studies. Or if they imply a controversial opinion is correct, yet don't explain why. OTOH it would not be unreasonable to say anecdotally that this or that technique works in my experience.
Well, actually the authors have mentioned 'the studies say....' without mentioning specific studies. I think that makes the statement less credible. Anyone can write a book with their own experience. But the reader has the right to be certain about the credibility of what he/she reads. Here the authors have just implied 'yes, what we say are true, and the researches say so' without specifically naming any.

At the same time I believe citations should be included whether you mention or not about any resources because definitely every author refer to resources unless they invented something or researched and found something. That citation will atleast give the credit to the original source.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
User avatar
LuckyR
Moderator
Posts: 5771
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 1:16 am

Re: Lack of citations, is it okay for a practical guide?

Post by LuckyR »

Sushan wrote: November 3rd, 2021, 5:17 am
LuckyR wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 4:48 pm
Sushan wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 7:16 am This topic is about the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD


The book is written by professionals, and I am sure they had no intention of providing false information. Yet I found it quite unusual for this book to have no citations at all. Maybe the authors thought to keep this book as a practical guide for the common people, and thought not to include citations. But I think the citations would have increased the credibility of the book.

What do you think? Is it okay for practical guides to not have citations? How can the reader be sure about the content and provided information?
There are several ways of looking at this topic. Certainly I would fault the authors if they write: many studies show... Yet cite no studies. Or if they imply a controversial opinion is correct, yet don't explain why. OTOH it would not be unreasonable to say anecdotally that this or that technique works in my experience.
Well, actually the authors have mentioned 'the studies say....' without mentioning specific studies. I think that makes the statement less credible. Anyone can write a book with their own experience. But the reader has the right to be certain about the credibility of what he/she reads. Here the authors have just implied 'yes, what we say are true, and the researches say so' without specifically naming any.

At the same time I believe citations should be included whether you mention or not about any resources because definitely every author refer to resources unless they invented something or researched and found something. That citation will atleast give the credit to the original source.
I completely agree (as stated). Good pickup.
"As usual... it depends."
Post Reply

Return to “Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD”

Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021