Is it practical?

Use this forum to discuss the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD
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Sushan
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Is it practical?

Post by Sushan »

This topic is about the November 2021 Philosophy Book of the Month, Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide by Gustavo Kinrys, MD


This is a practical guide to relieve anxiety and stress, by two authors who are renowned as well as experienced in the subject.

Yet, this is a book to read and understand by the reader him/herself, and then to apply its content to get relieved from his/her anxiety and stress.

To what extent this practice is practical? Without a proper assessment and a guidance from a trained personnel, will it deliver the expected results? Or will it worsen the issue?
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LuckyR
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Re: Is it practical?

Post by LuckyR »

Not unreasonable for a Self Help book to be DIY.
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Re: Is it practical?

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LuckyR wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 4:15 pm Not unreasonable for a Self Help book to be DIY.
Agreed. But this is not related to personal development, but to a medical/psychological issue, anxiety. It may have gone to the extent of making one crazy. And in such a situation DIY may not be a good option, but may be more harmful.
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Re: Is it practical?

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Sushan wrote: November 4th, 2021, 7:25 am
LuckyR wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 4:15 pm Not unreasonable for a Self Help book to be DIY.
Agreed. But this is not related to personal development, but to a medical/psychological issue, anxiety. It may have gone to the extent of making one crazy. And in such a situation DIY may not be a good option, but may be more harmful.
Well à book that says: "go see a professional", would be the world's shortest book. Besides mental health coverage is commonly substandard.
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Re: Is it practical?

Post by Memaw18 »

It is not practical. It is probably effective in the short term. However, without knowing all the aspects and deep reason of the anxiety and depression, I'm afraid the person still needs to be tested or needs to consult an expert.
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Re: Is it practical?

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LuckyR wrote: November 4th, 2021, 5:52 pm
Sushan wrote: November 4th, 2021, 7:25 am
LuckyR wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 4:15 pm Not unreasonable for a Self Help book to be DIY.
Agreed. But this is not related to personal development, but to a medical/psychological issue, anxiety. It may have gone to the extent of making one crazy. And in such a situation DIY may not be a good option, but may be more harmful.
Well à book that says: "go see a professional", would be the world's shortest book. Besides mental health coverage is commonly substandard.
I think it is better to advice anyone to seek professional help regarding medical matters. But why do you say mental health coverage is substandard? There are abundant amount of psychiatrists and psychologists, but the problem is people not seeking help from them in many occasions due to various other matters (non-medical) including social stigma. But if they seek professional help I do not think either they will be ignored or misdiagnosed.
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Re: Is it practical?

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Memaw18 wrote: November 8th, 2021, 1:42 am It is not practical. It is probably effective in the short term. However, without knowing all the aspects and deep reason of the anxiety and depression, I'm afraid the person still needs to be tested or needs to consult an expert.
Exactly. A book can be a help for a certain amount. But I think self-diagnosis is quite risky, but quite often practiced in psychiatric or related conditions. One can diagnose him/her having fever and take paracetamol (I am not encouraging this practice since fever can be associated with many serious conditions). But doing this for a psychiatric condition is often wrong in my opinion. Atleast one has to be assesed by a friend to properly identify that one's thought process and mood. If anyone feels like or been advised to see a professional regarding a psychiatric condition, it is better to do it sooner than later.
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Re: Is it practical?

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Sushan wrote: November 12th, 2021, 2:52 am
LuckyR wrote: November 4th, 2021, 5:52 pm
Sushan wrote: November 4th, 2021, 7:25 am
LuckyR wrote: November 2nd, 2021, 4:15 pm Not unreasonable for a Self Help book to be DIY.
Agreed. But this is not related to personal development, but to a medical/psychological issue, anxiety. It may have gone to the extent of making one crazy. And in such a situation DIY may not be a good option, but may be more harmful.
Well à book that says: "go see a professional", would be the world's shortest book. Besides mental health coverage is commonly substandard.
I think it is better to advice anyone to seek professional help regarding medical matters. But why do you say mental health coverage is substandard? There are abundant amount of psychiatrists and psychologists, but the problem is people not seeking help from them in many occasions due to various other matters (non-medical) including social stigma. But if they seek professional help I do not think either they will be ignored or misdiagnosed.
I meant insurance doesn't pay for mental health services very much, if at all.
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Re: Is it practical?

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LuckyR wrote: November 12th, 2021, 3:10 am
Sushan wrote: November 12th, 2021, 2:52 am
LuckyR wrote: November 4th, 2021, 5:52 pm
Sushan wrote: November 4th, 2021, 7:25 am

Agreed. But this is not related to personal development, but to a medical/psychological issue, anxiety. It may have gone to the extent of making one crazy. And in such a situation DIY may not be a good option, but may be more harmful.
Well à book that says: "go see a professional", would be the world's shortest book. Besides mental health coverage is commonly substandard.
I think it is better to advice anyone to seek professional help regarding medical matters. But why do you say mental health coverage is substandard? There are abundant amount of psychiatrists and psychologists, but the problem is people not seeking help from them in many occasions due to various other matters (non-medical) including social stigma. But if they seek professional help I do not think either they will be ignored or misdiagnosed.
I meant insurance doesn't pay for mental health services very much, if at all.
I am not aware much about health insurances and insurance policies. But as far as I know people can choose the coverage that they want, and if someone included mental illnesses in his/her coverage then the insurance companies are legally bound to compensate in such an event of being diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. I think many people do not think to get such a coverage thinking that they are immune to psychiatric illnesses.
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Re: Is it practical?

Post by LuckyR »

Sushan wrote: November 13th, 2021, 4:28 am
LuckyR wrote: November 12th, 2021, 3:10 am
Sushan wrote: November 12th, 2021, 2:52 am
LuckyR wrote: November 4th, 2021, 5:52 pm

Well à book that says: "go see a professional", would be the world's shortest book. Besides mental health coverage is commonly substandard.
I think it is better to advice anyone to seek professional help regarding medical matters. But why do you say mental health coverage is substandard? There are abundant amount of psychiatrists and psychologists, but the problem is people not seeking help from them in many occasions due to various other matters (non-medical) including social stigma. But if they seek professional help I do not think either they will be ignored or misdiagnosed.
I meant insurance doesn't pay for mental health services very much, if at all.
I am not aware much about health insurances and insurance policies. But as far as I know people can choose the coverage that they want, and if someone included mental illnesses in his/her coverage then the insurance companies are legally bound to compensate in such an event of being diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. I think many people do not think to get such a coverage thinking that they are immune to psychiatric illnesses.
Well here in the US most health insurance is through employers, who choose the offerings from the insurance carrier. Policies that cover more than the bare minimum mean more out of pocket costs to the employee. Since wages are at recent historic lows, few choose such plans.
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Re: Is it practical?

Post by Sushan »

LuckyR wrote: November 13th, 2021, 11:52 am
Sushan wrote: November 13th, 2021, 4:28 am
LuckyR wrote: November 12th, 2021, 3:10 am
Sushan wrote: November 12th, 2021, 2:52 am

I think it is better to advice anyone to seek professional help regarding medical matters. But why do you say mental health coverage is substandard? There are abundant amount of psychiatrists and psychologists, but the problem is people not seeking help from them in many occasions due to various other matters (non-medical) including social stigma. But if they seek professional help I do not think either they will be ignored or misdiagnosed.
I meant insurance doesn't pay for mental health services very much, if at all.
I am not aware much about health insurances and insurance policies. But as far as I know people can choose the coverage that they want, and if someone included mental illnesses in his/her coverage then the insurance companies are legally bound to compensate in such an event of being diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. I think many people do not think to get such a coverage thinking that they are immune to psychiatric illnesses.
Well here in the US most health insurance is through employers, who choose the offerings from the insurance carrier. Policies that cover more than the bare minimum mean more out of pocket costs to the employee. Since wages are at recent historic lows, few choose such plans.
Yes, it is understandable people thinking about the cost that they have to bear up regarding health matters and insurances. So it is fair enough for someone to not obtain coverage for a less expected illness.

I would like to know how insurance people mention about the psychiatric illnesses in their policies. Is it by mentioning it in general terms or do they use the ICD 10 or DSM V classifications? Because if they do the latter then no one will be able to get a redeemable health coverage due to the hughe number of various psychiatric illnesses.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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LuckyR
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Re: Is it practical?

Post by LuckyR »

Sushan wrote: November 14th, 2021, 12:33 am
LuckyR wrote: November 13th, 2021, 11:52 am
Sushan wrote: November 13th, 2021, 4:28 am
LuckyR wrote: November 12th, 2021, 3:10 am

I meant insurance doesn't pay for mental health services very much, if at all.
I am not aware much about health insurances and insurance policies. But as far as I know people can choose the coverage that they want, and if someone included mental illnesses in his/her coverage then the insurance companies are legally bound to compensate in such an event of being diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. I think many people do not think to get such a coverage thinking that they are immune to psychiatric illnesses.
Well here in the US most health insurance is through employers, who choose the offerings from the insurance carrier. Policies that cover more than the bare minimum mean more out of pocket costs to the employee. Since wages are at recent historic lows, few choose such plans.
Yes, it is understandable people thinking about the cost that they have to bear up regarding health matters and insurances. So it is fair enough for someone to not obtain coverage for a less expected illness.

I would like to know how insurance people mention about the psychiatric illnesses in their policies. Is it by mentioning it in general terms or do they use the ICD 10 or DSM V classifications? Because if they do the latter then no one will be able to get a redeemable health coverage due to the hughe number of various psychiatric illnesses.
As you might guess, exclusions (examples of less care) are buried in the fine print of lengthy documents and are not verbalized unless asked about specifically. My guess is diagnoses are not mentioned, rather expensive treatment (talk therapy) is limited by a cap on lifetime visits. Hus the limit is not on mental health, as long as it is on inexpensive medications.
"As usual... it depends."
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Re: Is it practical?

Post by Sushan »

LuckyR wrote: November 14th, 2021, 2:28 am
Sushan wrote: November 14th, 2021, 12:33 am
LuckyR wrote: November 13th, 2021, 11:52 am
Sushan wrote: November 13th, 2021, 4:28 am

I am not aware much about health insurances and insurance policies. But as far as I know people can choose the coverage that they want, and if someone included mental illnesses in his/her coverage then the insurance companies are legally bound to compensate in such an event of being diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. I think many people do not think to get such a coverage thinking that they are immune to psychiatric illnesses.
Well here in the US most health insurance is through employers, who choose the offerings from the insurance carrier. Policies that cover more than the bare minimum mean more out of pocket costs to the employee. Since wages are at recent historic lows, few choose such plans.
Yes, it is understandable people thinking about the cost that they have to bear up regarding health matters and insurances. So it is fair enough for someone to not obtain coverage for a less expected illness.

I would like to know how insurance people mention about the psychiatric illnesses in their policies. Is it by mentioning it in general terms or do they use the ICD 10 or DSM V classifications? Because if they do the latter then no one will be able to get a redeemable health coverage due to the hughe number of various psychiatric illnesses.
As you might guess, exclusions (examples of less care) are buried in the fine print of lengthy documents and are not verbalized unless asked about specifically. My guess is diagnoses are not mentioned, rather expensive treatment (talk therapy) is limited by a cap on lifetime visits. Hus the limit is not on mental health, as long as it is on inexpensive medications.
It is pretty much obvious that health insurance companies are profit based ones, and try their best to avoid any health claims from their clients. But if they are worried about the cost of medication, I think other specialities like cardiology and neurology are way more expensive than psychiatry related treatment. But if they think about the time period that a person will be treated for a psychiatric illness (which is usually for a long period and even sometimes for the whole life) then they might not see covering mental illnesses in their insurance policies as a profitable business.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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