Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Bakka Bhai wrote: May 15th, 2024, 8:55 am Was there ever a point in your life when you thought that you couldn't go further? Like did you ever get frustrated enough to just leave everything?

Hi, Bakka Bhai,


Thank you for your question! :)


If by "just leave everything" you mean commit suicide, then no, I've never been suicidal in this human life.
 
If I had ever thought that "I couldn't go forward", I would have been objectively wrong, as proven by the fact that I did go forward.
 
That relates heavily to this recent advice article I posted:
 
99% of the time someone says they cannot do something, they are lying to me and/or themselves.
 
 
Keep in mind that lying can be done simply by misrepresenting one's level of confidence or knowledge in a claim.
 
For example, the statement "It's raining outside" can be true, even if the statement "I know it's raining outside" is false and a lie.
 
Even if it is in fact raining outside, it could still be a lie to say (to yourself or others), "I am certain it is raining outside". If you aren't certain it is raining, then it's a lie to say or imply that you are certain.
 
If you only have evidence amounting to probable cause to believe it's probably raining outside, then it's a lie to say, "It's raining outside" since that implies knowledge or certainty. The honest truth would instead be to say something like, "I don't know if it is raining outside, but if I had to guess based on the limited evidence, I'd say it is probably raining outside. I have probable cause to believe it's probably raining, but I don't have proof."
 
There's an old joke that goes like this: "It's not paranoia if they're really out to get you."
 
It's a funny joke, but it's actually kind of wrong.
 
You can still be insanely paranoid even if they are out to get you, and you are if you don't have sufficient evidence to believe they are out to get you.
 
Most people don't suffer from full-blown paranoid schizophrenia, but many people (if not the vast majority of people) suffer from at least a moderately debilitating amount of unhealthy low self-esteem and/or social anxiety.
 
Even if every single person you met is in fact actually thinking bad things about you and is actively thinking you are dumb and ugly, you'd still generally be lying to yourself if you think they are and present those thoughts to yourself with undue certainty.
 
If you cannot know what they are thinking, then you are lying to yourself if you act like you know what they are thinking, even if your guesses are technically correct.
 
These are just examples.
 
Even if you live alone on a desert island and never communicate with another human, it can happen. Even if you are a total ugly idiot, it can still be a lie to think or say, "I am an ugly idiot", if you don't have sufficient evidence to support that claim.
 
A guess presented as knowledge isn't any less of a lie if it turns out to be true.
 
If the honest answer to a question is "I don't know", answering it as if you did know is a lie.
 
The question here is, can you go on?
 
Answering that question "no" will likely be a lie, even if you couldn't go on because the honest answer isn't the same as the actual answer. Even if the actual answer is no, the honest answer is probably "I don't know".
 
If you don't know and you flat-out answer yes or no, that's a lie.
 
If I had to guess, I'd bet that well over 90% of the negative and/or self-critical thinking the average person does is a lie.
 
They are thinking things they can't possibly know, and thus—even if they were true—are still lies.
 
 
I suggest you re-read the chapter in my book, "To find inner peace, simply stop fighting", since that chapter talks in detail about how to deal with the lies of the ego and mind, which are common; everyone's mind lies, meaning every human's brain thinks a lot of thoughts that are lies. However, mainly, the overall lesson my book teaches is to realize that you cannot stop the mind or brain from thinking false thoughts, but you can realize they are untrue lies and not believe them. You are not lying to yourself just because your mind has the untrue verbal thought, but only when you choose to believe it versus laugh it off as yet one more example of our silly, egotistical human minds doing what they do (e.g. jumping to wild conclusions and overthinking things).
 
 
Next, I suggest you right now choose to strictly follow all eleven of the numbered suggestions at the end. Then you will have free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness and spiritual freedom). Then, like me, you will believe that life is so worth living. You will look around, and everything you see will be a wonderful beautiful success. Everything will be acceptable and lovable. No matter where you look—left, right, up, down, east, or west—you will be filled with infinite love for the infinitely lovely and beautiful things all around you. You will be so invincible free and happy. That's not happy in the sense of the emotional high a drug addict feels when shooting up or that an overeating food addict feels when eating, but rather the true happiness that someone can feel even from within a literal prison cell or concentration camp. It's invincible spiritual freedom and invincible total complete spiritual fulfillment (i.e. unwavering spiritual happiness and inner peace) that nobody can take from you and that no outer circumstance can take from you.
 
If heaven is inner peace, and inner peace is a choice, then hell is just heaven for masochists. Hell is just a subset of heaven. In this most heavenly of heavens in which we find ourselves, even the masochistic hell-wishers get their wish.
 
The philosopher Albert Camus once wrote, "Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy."
 
I answer it with YES. That's not a guess. It's an answer that I wrote a whole book to explain. Anyone who reads my book and follows its suggestions can likewise answer Camus's question with a loud confident certain honest YES.
 
YES, life is so worth living. YES, I am so thankful this world exists rather than nothing. YES, this is heavenly, beautiful, perfect, and amazing. YES, I am so grateful. YES, every second I am awake in this world, I am grateful.
 
Life is a challenge, and, YES, I love it.
 
Even when I get punched in the face or encounter especially challenging challenges...
 
Correction: ESPECIALLY when I get punched in the face by life or encounter especially challenging challenges, then I say to life:
 
"Thank you, Life, for doing your best to punch me in my face and often succeeding. Thank you, Life, for being a worthy opponent, because if you were a less worthy (a.k.a. less tough or less challenging) opponent, I would be proportionally less happy due to the lack of challenge and the lack of having a worthy opponent. Thank you, Life, for constantly challenging me and never letting me rest for very long without a wake-up punch to the face. I love challenges! So thank you for constantly challenging me."
 
To paraphrase what I wrote in this Instagram post, I can only be as good as my toughest opponent. Life for me has become a journey of happily seeking ever-worthier opponents. Every day I say to life, "That's all you got, Life? Come on. Be a worthier opponent, Life. Come harder, Life. Surprise me. Give me your best, because that's the only way I can be my best."



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



“That's all you got, Life Come on. Be a worthier opponent, Life. Come harder, Life. Surprise me. Give me your best, because that's the only way I can be my best.”.png



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Bakka Bhai wrote: May 15th, 2024, 8:59 am Also, question 2nd. Whenever I pick a new hobby or a task, I'm very confident and happy and interested in it at first. But then I just get tired and bored of it. Did you ever feel like it? If yes, please tell me what must be done to get rid of it?

Hi, Bakka Bhai,


Thank you for your question! :)


What you are talking about is described in my book, In It Together, in detail, including but not limited to the following pages:
 
- Right at the beginning on page 4, when, among other things, the book says:
 
In It Together (Page 4) wrote:There is always more money to make or more fame to achieve. It is a constant, endless chain of desire. If you get this, then you will want that, and if you get that, then you will want this, or something else, something more. You cannot eliminate desire by fulfilling desire. Fulfillment causes desire and goals to be replaced, not eliminated. You cannot achieve a state of goallessness by achieving goals. So long as you live as a human, you will have unfulfilled desires and unachieved goals, as the human body and mind will always want more and will invariably create new goals once old goals have been achieved.
 
 
- On pages 112 and 113, where it discusses the concept of the grass always being greener on the other side, it says:
 
In It Together (Page 112) wrote:Without the contentment of inner peace, the grass is always greener on the other side and never green enough where one is.
 
In It Together (Page 113) wrote:No matter how much you feed the body and ego, it will only get hungrier. In terms of that figurative hunger, the greedy always starve, damned to a living hell of their own insatiability.
 
No matter how much you chase greener grass, it will never be green enough, and it will always appear greener on the other side. There will always be greener to reach. You will be stuck in a cycle of addiction, always discontent with where you are, always discontent with the grass upon which you stand, always chasing ever greener grass, always fighting, never winning, always lacking inner peace.
 
You cannot feed the spirit with the body’s food.


- On page 173, when I discuss The Hedonic Treadmill:
 
In It Together (Page 173) wrote:If you define happiness as having no unachieved goals, and wait to have inner peace until you achieve all your goals and fulfill your desires, it will never happen. That's a future that does not exist, that cannot exist.
 
This process of trying to get to that living heaven on Earth by feeding the insatiable body and ego, of foolishly trying to actually satiate it, is called the hedonic treadmill.
 
Inner peace does not exist at the end of the hedonic treadmill. Nothing does. Nothing does because the end of that treadmill does not exist.
 
 
Those are just a few examples of where these concepts are discussed in the book.
 
My suggestion is that you re-read the book in full.
 
Then make sure you are following all eleven of the numbered suggestions at the end of the book.
 
If you do that, you will definitely immediately have full-fledged invincible unwavering inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness and spiritual fulfillment) and extreme self-discipline (a.k.a. spiritual freedom).
 
That won't get you off the proverbial treadmill. You will still always have unmet goals and unfulfilled desires, but you will be spiritually fulfilled (a.k.a. truly happy) with free-spirited inner peace while you enjoy that endless chasing of ever-new goals.
 
A person with free-spirited inner peace will tend to have more consistency than an unhappy person (i.e. someone lacking inner peace and/or lacking spiritual freedom, a.k.a. self-discipline). That's mainly because someone with free-spirited inner peace isn't expecting the impossible from these external activities, indulgences and accomplishments.
 
In contrast, consider someone who lacks inner peace and (in other words) feels like they have this unfillable hole deep down inside of them, like a spiritual hole or emotional hole in them. That person tends to use external activities (sex, videos, TV, etc.), indulgences (e.g. alcohol, food), and accomplishments (becoming famous, getting an award, reaching a goal, having a fancy car, etc.) in a desperate, futile attempt to fill that hole inside of them, but those kinds of things only make that hole bigger and make the person more hungry for those kinds of indulgences and accomplishments.
 
To speak in shorter, rougher words: The unhappy person wants those external activities, goals, and accomplishments to make them happy—truly happy—but those things can't and never will, which leads to short-term inconsistency and also leads to long-term cycles of addiction, which create toxic and miserable forms of abstract stagnation (i.e. staying still by running fast in a big circle over and over, proverbially speaking).
 
Since the external activities, indulgences, and accomplishments don't ever work in the way the unhappy person wants them to, the person tends to get bored with any such activity or accomplishment and/or gives up on the activity, habit, or goal much more quickly than someone with free-spirited inner peace would.
 
I mention this in the book when I say that someone who is happy to run and happy while running will tend to run longer and further than someone who is unhappy running and is only running because they falsely think the running will make them happy when it won't.
 
In part, it's common sense: The person who hates working out at the gym and is miserable while they do it is going to tend to quit faster than the person who is happy while they do it.
 
Many mistake the emotional high that comes with novelty, new relationships, gambling, drinking alcohol, and bodily indulgences like sex and eating cookies for true happiness (a.k.a. inner peace and spiritual fulfillment). They mistake the inherently fleeting highs that are always balanced by equal lows as if they were true happiness or fulfillment, which in contrast, is unwavering and persists through both ups and downs of the yin-yang-balanced roller coaster of bodily comfort, bodily indulgences, and emotional highs and lows.
 
In yet another example of the same pattern, an unhappy person who expects their romantic partner to make them happy, namely by believing in The Misery-Inducing Myth of the Magical Other will thus likely tend to have many short-term relationships that don't last and end poorly, versus someone who is happy and doesn't expect their romantic partner to do the impossible. However, there is a dangerous irony in which, at the start of the new relationship (or hobby, or drug addiction, or activity, or job, or career, etc.), there is an emotional high and honeymoon phase that deceivingly reinforces the misery-inducing myth of the magical other. The inherently fleeting emotional high of a new lust-filled relationship, the novelty of a new exciting hobby, or the fleeting high that comes with the first few drinks during an alcoholic's relapse can all be mistaken for true happiness, which then reinforces the false myth that indulging in those kinds of things can bring happiness, which ironically is what makes the person want to drop those things in a short time once they fail to live up to that impossible mission. Even just a few months later, the person might even resentfully hate the new girlfriend, the new job, the new hobby, or the new relapse and then hatefully give it up with resentment, anger, and bitterness because it 'failed' to make them happy (i.e. didn't do the impossible).
 
If you continue to look for those kinds of things to make you truly happy (i.e. to give you free-spirited inner peace), then you will continue to keep ending up frustrated and disappointed, and you will never get to enjoy the taste of true happiness for even a moment.
 
That's not to say don't do those things. I'm not saying don't start a new hobby (e.g. rock climbing), enjoy some comforting indulgence (e.g. alcohol), or enter a new romantic relationship. I'm just saying don't use it as a means to get happy, because it won't work, and then you won't ever be happy.
 
Instead, be happy first. Be happy now.
 
Don't chase happiness, because then you will never be happy. Be happy chasing while you chase whatever you chase. Then you will always be happy because the chasing never ends.
 
 
Essentially, with your question, you seem to be asking how to do something that my book explicitly says is impossible to do, like Sisyphus asking me how to get his boulder to stay at the top of the hill. Based on the fact that you even asked this question, it seems like you missed key teachings in my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.
 
I could be off, but it also seems like you don't yet have free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness and spiritual fulfillment). That presumably means you aren't following all eleven of the numbered suggestions at the end of the book. That's because if you were following those suggestions, you would already have free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) and spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline).
 
Assuming the above guess is correct, then my advice to you is to re-read In It Together and then immediately start doing your absolute best to strictly follow all eleven of the easy-to-follow suggestions at the end. If you do that, you will then immediately have free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) and spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline). Then, your problem will be solved in two ways: First, you won't mind when you get bored with one hobby and thus decide to pick up a different one because you'll already be happy throughout that whole process. Second, you will actually tend to stick with your hobbies (and relationships, and goals) longer. You'll stick with them longer because you will have unfading unfleeting true happiness while you are doing them, so you have less motivation to quit in that you won't have unhappiness motivating you to quit. Likewise, when the would-be crisis of disillusionment hits (i.e. when the honeymoon phase starts to end), it won't be as devastating and won't really be a crisis of disillusionment because you will never have the illusion that the activity, hobby, or relationship will make you happy or that the honeymoon will last forever. The irony is that when you don't expect the honeymoon phase to last forever and do the impossible (i.e. make you happy), then it tends to last much longer because you don't get all upset and hateful when it fails to do the impossible and fails to live up to impossible expectations.
 
They still phase out, but they tend to do it slower. You never get off the roller coaster and never achieve a state of full-fledged outer peace, but inner peace does tend to smooth out the roller coaster a bit and make the outer world around you much more peaceful.
 
Once you let go of those impossible expectations, all that frustrating hate-worthy failure becomes revealed as an illusion created by your own unrealistic expectations.
 
As I wrote in my article about letting go of expectation: I have inner peace because I have no unmet expectations. I have no unmet expectations because I have no expectations.
 
Don't expect it to last forever, and it will tend to last long. Don't expect it to last long, and it will tend to last longer.
 
Don't expect anything, and then it won't matter how long it lasts, because you will be invincibly happy with invincible unwavering inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness and spiritual fulfillment) no matter what happens. Then it will tend to last the longest of all, and without asking, you will be showered with all the external things other people desperately chase because they falsely think they can bring true happiness and freedom.
 
But true happiness and spiritual freedom cost nothing, and you can have them right away.
 
You don't need to read my book to find it and have it. Many find it and have it without reading my book. But, reading my book and following all eleven of the infinitely easy-to-follow suggestions at the end is guaranteed to result in you having inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) and spiritual freedom.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



Don't chase happiness..png



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: May 28th, 2024, 2:16 pm If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Bakka Bhai wrote: May 15th, 2024, 8:55 am Was there ever a point in your life when you thought that you couldn't go further? Like did you ever get frustrated enough to just leave everything?

Hi, Bakka Bhai,


Thank you for your question! :)


If by "just leave everything" you mean commit suicide, then no, I've never been suicidal in this human life.
 
If I had ever thought that "I couldn't go forward", I would have been objectively wrong, as proven by the fact that I did go forward.
 
That relates heavily to this recent advice article I posted:
 
99% of the time someone says they cannot do something, they are lying to me and/or themselves.
 
 
Keep in mind that lying can be done simply by misrepresenting one's level of confidence or knowledge in a claim.
 
For example, the statement "It's raining outside" can be true, even if the statement "I know it's raining outside" is false and a lie.
 
Even if it is in fact raining outside, it could still be a lie to say (to yourself or others), "I am certain it is raining outside". If you aren't certain it is raining, then it's a lie to say or imply that you are certain.
 
If you only have evidence amounting to probable cause to believe it's probably raining outside, then it's a lie to say, "It's raining outside" since that implies knowledge or certainty. The honest truth would instead be to say something like, "I don't know if it is raining outside, but if I had to guess based on the limited evidence, I'd say it is probably raining outside. I have probable cause to believe it's probably raining, but I don't have proof."
 
There's an old joke that goes like this: "It's not paranoia if they're really out to get you."
 
It's a funny joke, but it's actually kind of wrong.
 
You can still be insanely paranoid even if they are out to get you, and you are if you don't have sufficient evidence to believe they are out to get you.
 
Most people don't suffer from full-blown paranoid schizophrenia, but many people (if not the vast majority of people) suffer from at least a moderately debilitating amount of unhealthy low self-esteem and/or social anxiety.
 
Even if every single person you met is in fact actually thinking bad things about you and is actively thinking you are dumb and ugly, you'd still generally be lying to yourself if you think they are and present those thoughts to yourself with undue certainty.
 
If you cannot know what they are thinking, then you are lying to yourself if you act like you know what they are thinking, even if your guesses are technically correct.
 
These are just examples.
 
Even if you live alone on a desert island and never communicate with another human, it can happen. Even if you are a total ugly idiot, it can still be a lie to think or say, "I am an ugly idiot", if you don't have sufficient evidence to support that claim.
 
A guess presented as knowledge isn't any less of a lie if it turns out to be true.
 
If the honest answer to a question is "I don't know", answering it as if you did know is a lie.
 
The question here is, can you go on?
 
Answering that question "no" will likely be a lie, even if you couldn't go on because the honest answer isn't the same as the actual answer. Even if the actual answer is no, the honest answer is probably "I don't know".
 
If you don't know and you flat-out answer yes or no, that's a lie.
 
If I had to guess, I'd bet that well over 90% of the negative and/or self-critical thinking the average person does is a lie.
 
They are thinking things they can't possibly know, and thus—even if they were true—are still lies.
 
 
I suggest you re-read the chapter in my book, "To find inner peace, simply stop fighting", since that chapter talks in detail about how to deal with the lies of the ego and mind, which are common; everyone's mind lies, meaning every human's brain thinks a lot of thoughts that are lies. However, mainly, the overall lesson my book teaches is to realize that you cannot stop the mind or brain from thinking false thoughts, but you can realize they are untrue lies and not believe them. You are not lying to yourself just because your mind has the untrue verbal thought, but only when you choose to believe it versus laugh it off as yet one more example of our silly, egotistical human minds doing what they do (e.g. jumping to wild conclusions and overthinking things).
 
 
Next, I suggest you right now choose to strictly follow all eleven of the numbered suggestions at the end. Then you will have free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness and spiritual freedom). Then, like me, you will believe that life is so worth living. You will look around, and everything you see will be a wonderful beautiful success. Everything will be acceptable and lovable. No matter where you look—left, right, up, down, east, or west—you will be filled with infinite love for the infinitely lovely and beautiful things all around you. You will be so invincible free and happy. That's not happy in the sense of the emotional high a drug addict feels when shooting up or that an overeating food addict feels when eating, but rather the true happiness that someone can feel even from within a literal prison cell or concentration camp. It's invincible spiritual freedom and invincible total complete spiritual fulfillment (i.e. unwavering spiritual happiness and inner peace) that nobody can take from you and that no outer circumstance can take from you.
 
If heaven is inner peace, and inner peace is a choice, then hell is just heaven for masochists. Hell is just a subset of heaven. In this most heavenly of heavens in which we find ourselves, even the masochistic hell-wishers get their wish.
 
The philosopher Albert Camus once wrote, "Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy."
 
I answer it with YES. That's not a guess. It's an answer that I wrote a whole book to explain. Anyone who reads my book and follows its suggestions can likewise answer Camus's question with a loud confident certain honest YES.
 
YES, life is so worth living. YES, I am so thankful this world exists rather than nothing. YES, this is heavenly, beautiful, perfect, and amazing. YES, I am so grateful. YES, every second I am awake in this world, I am grateful.
 
Life is a challenge, and, YES, I love it.
 
Even when I get punched in the face or encounter especially challenging challenges...
 
Correction: ESPECIALLY when I get punched in the face by life or encounter especially challenging challenges, then I say to life:
 
"Thank you, Life, for doing your best to punch me in my face and often succeeding. Thank you, Life, for being a worthy opponent, because if you were a less worthy (a.k.a. less tough or less challenging) opponent, I would be proportionally less happy due to the lack of challenge and the lack of having a worthy opponent. Thank you, Life, for constantly challenging me and never letting me rest for very long without a wake-up punch to the face. I love challenges! So thank you for constantly challenging me."
 
To paraphrase what I wrote in this Instagram post, I can only be as good as my toughest opponent. Life for me has become a journey of happily seeking ever-worthier opponents. Every day I say to life, "That's all you got, Life? Come on. Be a worthier opponent, Life. Come harder, Life. Surprise me. Give me your best, because that's the only way I can be my best."



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott




“That's all you got, Life Come on. Be a worthier opponent, Life. Come harder, Life. Surprise me. Give me your best, because that's the only way I can be my best.”.png




In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.


Imagining what the other person is thinking or feeling is lying to yourself because you will never know what goes on in the other person's head. Stop lying to yourself and stay true to who you are. It's only you that matters and what you think about yourself. Anyone else doesn't matter because you would be lying to yourself if you think you knew them and what they think.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Bakka Bhai »

Who is your favorite artist? As in who is your favorite book writer?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Ambar Gill »

First, I'd like to say I loved your book! Thank you for creating it and sharing it with us! My question for you is: What is one thing you would recommend for someone in their early twenties to try or do at least once in their life?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Bakka Bhai wrote: June 7th, 2024, 12:50 pm Who is your favorite artist? As in who is your favorite book writer?
Hi, Bakka Bhai,

Thank you for your question! :)

My favorite artist of all time is Vincent Van Gogh. By no coincidence, you will notice I quoted him in my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.
 
My favorite living artist is the songwriter, singer, and musician Mike Posner.
 
My favorite writer and author is Voltairine de Cleyre. I specify this right in the very first sentence of the introduction in my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



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*****

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*****

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In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Ambar Gill wrote: June 10th, 2024, 3:21 pm First, I'd like to say I loved your book! Thank you for creating it and sharing it with us! My question for you is: What is one thing you would recommend for someone in their early twenties to [test out] or do at least once in their life?
 
 
Hi, Ambar Gill,
 
Thank you for your question! :D
 
Generally speaking, anything I'd strongly recommend everyone do once is something I'd strongly recommend they do many times, such as brushing their teeth, reading a book, and so on.
 
Usually, the point of doing something "at least once" is to see if you like it so much (or otherwise benefit from it so much) as to want to do it more times. It's a type of scientific experiment. But it starts with the hypothesis that there is a good chance that that thing would be particularly or uniquely enjoyable to you. For example, if someone really loves pancakes, I might recommend they eat a meal at IHOP at least once.
 
Knowing nothing more about you than that you are currently 20 years old is not enough information for me to recommend anything like that to you.
 
That speaks to these important mantras of mine that I hold very close to my heart:
 
- To each their own.
 
- The beauty of freedom is the creative diversity it engenders.
 
- One person's trash is another's treasure.
 
- Live and let live.
 
- Do less better.
 
 
To answer your question, I would first need you to answer the following questions:
 
- What are some activities you have done that you enjoyed the most?
 
- What are some things you have done that you enjoyed a lot but that most people don't enjoy doing?
 
- What are some things you don't enjoy doing that most people do enjoy doing?
 
- What qualities and traits make you most different from the average person? (Keep in mind, the average person is a hypothetical person. No real person is average. In analogy, if you have 10 balls, and 5 are yellow and 5 are blue, the average ball is green even though no actual ball is green. Or if you have 10 boxes and 5 are large and 5 are small, the average box is medium-sized even though there are no medium-sized boxes. The 'average' is just a hypothetical mathematical construct.)
 
 
Your question also leads me to slightly suspect that you may possibly have a bias towards doing versus not doing. That would be true only to the extent that doing little to nothing for prolonged periods of time makes you feel anxious or such, and/or to the extent that you have some sense or feeling like you need to be doing something or that there is some great but undiscovered mission in life that you desperately must accomplish before you die, as if there is some deep secret or faraway achievement you must find or achieve to unlock inner peace, spiritual freedom, and true happiness. In other words, if you already have a deep extreme inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness and spiritual fulfillment) as well as extreme self-discipline (a.k.a. spiritual freedom), then it's almost guaranteed you do not have a bias towards doing. In yet other words, the bias towards overdoing comes from an obsessive, anxious, and inaccurate sense that one is underdoing or that one has (so far) underdone, so if you don't have anything close to that kind of anxiety, then it is unlikely you have a bias towards doing.
 
Regardless, just to be safe, in a slight contradiction of what I have written above about not having enough information to recommend specific actions for you to do only at least once in your life, here is one recommendation, and I recommend you do this one as soon as reasonably possible: I recommend you read each of the following posts of mine in full (at least once):
 
- Do less better! | The incredible power of doing nothing
 
- Orwellian Agent-Smithism | How Control Freaks, God Complexes, And Violent Nanny Statism Attack Freedom and Diversity
(This article helps explain why your age alone isn't enough information for me to recommend activities to you. A one-size-fits-all recommendation would be me engaging in what I call Orwellian Agent-Smithism.)
 
 
Finally, another answer you may want to consider would be this:
 
At least once in your life, do something nobody else has done.
 
At least once in your life, do something that nobody else has done and nobody else ever will do.
 
At least once in your life, in one sense or another, be a brave free-spirited pioneer. Break new ground. Go somewhere nobody else has been and nobody else ever will be.

 
 
I am not recommending you follow the advice in the above three paragraphs because I don't know enough about what makes you a single individual unique human to know if the above would be a good recommendation for you specifically. But it is likely worth at least considering if that kind of goal—to be a pioneer—would be helpful and desirable for you.
 
 
 
With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



“What is something you recommend someone do at least once in their life”.png



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango »

One man's meat is another man's treasure is very true and one of life's important mantras. Do what you love abd desure from your heart. Do what makes you feel happy and fulfilled. Thanks Scott for the advice.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Adaboo »

This is top-notch advice with good standing standards. I'm glad I'm getting informed and educated so we don't get confused and mistaken in our twenties. I see a lot of shows and programs on how to live our twenties. Which is helpful every moment.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Mojisola Omowunmi Omotosho »

What are your thoughts on the bible and homosexuality?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Mojisola Omowunmi Omotosho wrote: June 17th, 2024, 6:06 pm What are your thoughts on the bible and homosexuality?
Hi, Mojisola Omowunmi Omotosho,

Thank you for your question! :)

I don't really think about either of those two things much.
 
In other words, generally speaking, I don't have thoughts on either of those two things.
 
Likewise, I don't have thoughts about most things.
 
Of almost all things, I have no thoughts or opinions.
 
A human brain and mind can only fit so few thoughts in them at a time. In a human life, you can only think about so very few things of all the countless and seemingly infinite things you could think about. All of us don't think about most things.
 
My mind might be especially clear and peaceful for a human, such that perhaps I think about 1/10th as many things as the average person thinks about, meaning if I sit around and meditate I would have 1/10th as many words and thoughts going through my head in the same time as someone else doing the same thing, meaning at any given time my mind tends to feel 10 times as spacious, open, and peaceful, meaning at any given time I feel 10 times less mentally exhausted than the average person and thus have 10 times as much power in the bank, so to speak.
 
But even if you think about as many things as you possibly can, such that your mind is so exhausted and stuffed full of as many rushed crowded thoughts as you can stuff in there, you still will think about less than 0.00001% of things.
 
Of almost all things, you must have no thoughts.
 
You can only make a special exemption for a teeny tiny fraction of things.
 
Generally speaking, neither homosexuality nor any one specific religion's bible are things for which I make an exception.
 
For more on this subject, please see the following answers and posts of mine:
 

(Q&A) What do I say to someone who wants my opinion on XYZ?

 
(Instagram Post) "To learn to let yourself not have an opinion is so liberating. It's a big part of what puts the free in free-spirited."
 
 
(Q&A) "How do you decide how to respond to or react to something when it happens to or around you?"
 
 
(Post about Overthinking) Not everything has a truth value. Not every sentence has meaning. You don't have to have an opinion about everything.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



Thoughts on the Bible.png



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Hilda Murithi »

What's the most controversial thing you believe in? Do you have any views that people view as outrageous and how do you view people's thoughts about them?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Hilda Murithi wrote: June 24th, 2024, 3:22 am What's the most controversial thing you believe in? Do you have any views that people view as outrageous and how do you view people's thoughts about them?
Hi, Hilda Murithi,

Thank you for your question! :)

I believe I answered that question right on page 1 of my book:

In It Together (Page 1) wrote: Love, equality, freedom, and peace may be the most dangerously controversial subjects about which one can speak. To speak in support of love, one challenges haters. To speak in support of fundamental human equality, one challenges sexists, racists, and those who would dehumanize others as inferior. To speak of freedom and peace, one challenges violent oppressors; one challenges murderers, rapists, and enslavers, the most dangerous of whom may be the ones who claim to commit such violence for the alleged greater good.

Such self-proclaimed utilitarians may be the most dangerous people, if not for their self-righteousness, then for the eager willingness with which they commit violent atrocities. Indeed, the most dangerous people capable of the most violent acts often tend to be the ones who think they, unequally, are the so-called “good guys”.


The rest of that chapter goes over the concepts in more detail, so I do recommend you re-read the whole chapter.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



To speak in support of love, one challenges haters..png



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Abdm28 »

"I'm deeply concerned about my parents' health, especially my 78-year-old mother who is struggling with fever and high blood pressure. Despite my best efforts to share my knowledge and advice on healthy habits, she refuses to listen, citing my youth and perceived lack of expertise. As her child, it's heartbreaking to see her dismiss my concerns and rely solely on pharmaceuticals, which only mask her symptoms without addressing the root causes. Her lack of education and literacy in health matters makes it even more challenging. I've tried explaining the importance of lifestyle changes and dietary adjustments, but she won't budge. I'm desperate to find a way to help her understand the value of preventive care and make positive changes. Please, what can I do to help my mother take control of her health and well-being?" 😢😔
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

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Abdm28 wrote: June 27th, 2024, 6:56 am I'm deeply concerned about my parents' health, especially my 78-year-old mother who is struggling with fever and high blood pressure. Despite my best efforts to share my knowledge and advice on healthy habits, she refuses to listen, citing my youth and perceived lack of expertise. As her child, it's heartbreaking to see her dismiss my concerns and rely solely on pharmaceuticals, which only mask her symptoms without addressing the root causes. Her lack of education and literacy in health matters makes it even more challenging. I've tried explaining the importance of lifestyle changes and dietary adjustments, but she won't budge. I'm desperate to find a way to help her understand the value of preventive care and make positive changes. Please, what can I do to help my mother take control of her health and well-being?😢😔
Hi, Abdm28,

Thank you for your question! :)

If I am understanding what you mean correctly (which is never a safe bet :lol: ), this would be an accurate paraphrasing of what you have said:
 
- I'm deeply concerned and worried about something outside of my control.
 
- I've been trying as hard as I can to control and/or change someone else's choices and behavior.
 
- I'm heartbroken to see things out of my control happen the way they uncontrollably happen.
 
- I've tried.
 
- I'm desperate to change someone else's behavior.
 
- How do you recommend I go about cleaning my mother's proverbial backyard?
 
 
If I am misunderstanding (i.e. if the above is not an accurate paraphrasing of what you are asking me), please do let me know.
 
Otherwise, here is my answer:
 
I don't engage in any judgmentalism at all, but, if I was going to judge the messiness of either backyard, based on the information provided, I'd bet your proverbial backyard is messier than your mother's.
 
However, even if her proverbial backyard was messier than yours, it still wouldn't make sense to "try" (your word) to clean her backyard. It's her choice (a.k.a. responsibility) to clean her own proverbial backyard or not and to decide what clean means for her. And that also explains why I would never actually judge her backyard (or even yours) as messy, because, in a sense, it can't be. It is how she chooses for it to be. Just like you and I with our choices, she is 100% in control of her choices. When it comes to her choices, she always gets exactly what she wants, meaning what she chooses. Therefore, her backyard is inexorably clean. To each their own. One person's trash is another person's treasure. One person's messy is another's clean.
 
Your subjective version of treasurable, clean, messy, or trashy only applies to your own proverbial backyard, not your mother's and not your neighbor's.
 
My advice to you, if you want it (which presumably you do, since you are here asking for it), is this:
 
Follow all eleven of the numbered suggestions in my book.
 
I know for a fact that you aren't doing that yet. That's because you admit it in your question.
 
One of the suggestions in my book very explicitly advises you to never try. But in your question, you admit to trying. You literally use the word 'try' in your question.
 
While (as my book explains) you typically cannot control your bodily feelings, if you were following the suggestions in my book, you almost certainly wouldn't be feeling very much of the following:
 
- concern and worry about things you cannot control
 
- unwelcomed desperation
 
- unwelcomed heartbreak
 
 
The fact that you are feeling those feelings to such an extreme degree, and more importantly, seeing your experience of those feelings as a problem that you want to fix, is a major symptom of you not following the teachings of my book.
 
That's not to say that someone who follows the teachings of my book won't ever feel uncontrollable heartbreak or uncontrollable grief or such. But rather, what we can say for sure is that someone following the teachings of my book won't ever feel any willful resentment, willful hate, willful unacceptance, or willful unforgiveness.
 
And, when you are not choosing to engage in any resentment or unforgiveness or such, and you aren't willfully trying to change what you cannot, then, as a result, you end up experiencing much less of the conventionally negative feelings like grief, pain, sadness, anger, and so on.
 
You still find yourself going through all the stages of grief during your human life, but you go through them much quicker and much more welcomingly. More importantly, while going through them, you don't resent the fact that you are going through them. You learn to be happy and artistic and free-spirited and such even when you are going through grief or experiencing pain. Marcus Aurelius is paraphrased in the movie Gladiator as saying, "Death smiles at us all. All a man can do is smile back."
 
The same goes not just for death, but for heartbreak, grief, fear, and bodily pain and bodily discomfort in general. One experiences all of these things frequently, no matter what one does. They come to one like a rainstorm, dark clouds, or even a hurricane. You'd be more likely to make it never ever literally rain again than to make it so that bodily pain, fear, heartbreak, or grief never came to you again, let alone avoid death itself. Those are all inevitable, but they can be easily welcomed with a stoic loving friendly smile. While the smile may be a spiritual or proverbial smile, rather than a literal visible movement of this human mouth, I smile at death; I smile at pain; I smile at fear; I smile at discomfort; I smile at heartbreak; I smile when my literal human eyes cry. I don't just smile a little at these things. I smile a huge loving grin, with loving laughter, and a sense of Amor Fati. As if I was destined to re-live this moment over and over infinite times, as if this moment—this little unique here and now, meaning this little momentary conscious experience—was my personal unchanging eternal heaven or hell, meaning if I smile at it, I will smile forever, and if I frown hatefully or hate it with miserable resentment, I will be frowning and feeling miserable resentment for every second for the rest of eternity, forever and ever. I'm not saying that is an accurate representation of the metaphysics of reality, but just that I live each moment like it was my last, meaning I make the most and best of each moment, namely by always smiling, grinning, and laughing in my spirit.
 
When it comes to the true happiness about which my book teaches, which may be better called invincible free-spirited inner peace or unwavering spiritual fulfillment, that kind of happiness is the kind you can have even when your literal human eyes are crying. It's the kind you can have even when you are experiencing bodily pain, fear, anger, hunger, and grief. It's the kind of happiness you can have even when you are experiencing bodily feelings of sexual frustration or unrequited romantic love or bodily longing. It's the kind of happiness you can have even when it is raining, whether that is literal rain or proverbial rain. You can have it no matter what the weather is and no matter what happens externally (i.e. no matter what happens in regard to things you cannot control). That's why we call that kind of true unwavering happiness and invincible peace 'inner'. Whether or not you have true happiness, that is inner peace, is 100% in your control.
 
That kind of happiness is a choice.
 
From your question, I can tell that you have not yet chosen it.
 
It's 100% in your grasp. With infinite ease, you can reach out and grab it and have it. But you have not yet chosen to.
 
That's the sense in which, if I was going to say anyone's proverbial backyard was messy at all, I'd say yours—not your mother's—is the messiest of all. But I don't say that. I don't believe in real messy yards. Proverbially speaking, that is. Instead, here is my response when I notice someone choosing to not have free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness):
 
When I see someone in hell, I smile inside myself, and I think, "Good for him; he's getting what he's choosing."
 
 
I'd consider my proverbial backyard to be horribly messy if it looked like yours. But one person's trash is another person's treasure. To each their own. One person's messy is another's clean.
 
No proverbial backyards are truly messy.
 
If your backyard looked like mine, yours would be messy. And, if mine looked like yours, mine would be messy. But such states don't exist. My backyard always looks like mine, meaning it always looks like itself, and yours always looks like yours, meaning it always looks like itself. Whatever it is, it is what it is. Whoever they are, they are who they are. Thus, no proverbial backyards are ever messy. Everyone and everything is a success. Failure is an illusion, and trying is lying.
 
Each person gets exactly what they choose:
 
1. When it comes to my choices, I get exactly what I want, meaning what I choose. My proverbial backyard is exactly the way I am choosing for it to be. My proverbial backyard is exactly the way I want it to be. And thus, my backyard is always inexorably perfectly clean. It can't be messy, ever. It is a perfect wonderful treasurable treasure exactly as it is.
 
2. When it comes to your choices, you get exactly what you want, meaning what you choose. Your proverbial backyard is exactly the way you are choosing for it to be. It's scattered with "trying" and "desperation" and desperate effort, and thus also failure and the avoidable heartbreak and avoidable grief that come as a result of desperate trying and/or from unforgiveness and willful resentment. If those things were in my backyard, I'd consider my yard messy, but that's why they aren't in my backyard at all. They are in yours, but that's okay; everything is okay, always and inexorably so. Your proverbial backyard is exactly the way you want it to be. And thus, your backyard is always inexorably perfectly clean. It can't be messy, ever. It is a perfect wonderful treasurable treasure exactly as it is.
 
3. When it comes to your mother's choices, she gets exactly what she wants, meaning what she chooses. Her proverbial backyard is exactly the way she is choosing for it to be. Her proverbial backyard is exactly the way she wants it to be. And thus, her backyard is always inexorably perfectly clean. It can't be messy, ever. It is a perfect wonderful treasurable treasure exactly as it is.
 
 
All three proverbial yards are perfect and clean just the way they are.
 
You desperately try to change your mom's backyard, or more accurately, you choose to perceive yourself as doing so. (In reality, there is no try, and your perception that you are trying is a delusion.)
 
Luckily, trying always results in failure and disgrace. Or, more accurately, trying (meaning really merely the perception thereof) is disgrace, by definition. In contrast, grace is to do without trying. For more on that, please see my poem, What Grace Means to Me. I am grateful to think how extremely lucky we are that all the control freaks and anyone else with a god complex who tries to control the world and control others are destined to always fail. I am grateful that those who try to clean their neighbor's backyard always fail. Of course, both the trying and the failure are actually illusions, hence why they are doomed. Those control freaks with god complexes never actually have even the slightest amount of the power or righteousness they imagine themselves as having. It's all in their self-righteous overactive imagination. It's like imagining oneself as having magic powers, and so they shake their fist or wand at the sky to change and control the weather. Luckily, they cannot. We are spiritually protected from them thanks to the fact that trying is lying; it's an illusion. They can't really trespass on our proverbial backyards, no matter how much they imagine "trying" exists and imagine themselves as "trying" to control what they cannot (e.g. our proverbial backyard). Luckily, we are protected by the illusionary nature of their illusions—hence our spiritual invincibility, hence the invincibility of invincible inner peace and invincible spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline). No matter what they do or imagine, we—luckily—always remain 100% in control of our choices.

I think your mom is perfect exactly the way she is. I think her proverbial backyard is perfect exactly the way it is. I think her proverbial backyard is perfectly clean just the way it is.
 
If you disagree with me about even one of those three things, then that's totally fine, but it raises some questions. I don't have a standard of imperfection or a standard of failure. To me, nothing and nobody is a failure. To me, nothing and nobody is imperfect. To me, failure and imperfection don't exist. To me, trying, failure, and imperfection are all just superstitious phantoms (i.e. hellish delusions) that other people believe in or somehow see despite them not really being there. To me, they are imaginary tormenting ghosts that some people believe in or even really see in the sense that a delusional or hallucinating person can really see something that isn't really there. It's not really there, but they are still really seeing it.
 
So if you are seeing failure and/or imperfection in the world when you look around, it raises the question of what the standards and qualifications are that you use to categorize things between being (1) a failure and/or imperfect versus (2) being perfect and completely successful.
 
To help me understand that, I would ask you the following questions (and keep in mind I would only ask these if I found out that you believe your mom isn't perfect just the way she is and/or that her yard is clean just the way it is):
 
1. According to your own standards of perfection, are you perfect?
 
2. According to your own standards of what makes someone or something a failure versus a success, are you a success or a failure?
 
3. Is your own proverbial backyard completely clean? Could it possibly be any cleaner?
 
4. In terms of physical (i.e. non-mental and non-psychological) health, are you the healthiest person in the world? If not, why not? What (if anything) is something you could do differently that would make you even healthier?
 
5. In terms of mental health, are you the healthiest person in the entire world? If not, why not? What is something you could do differently that would make you healthier mentally?
 
 
Looking through my own eyes, I simply don't see trying, failure, or imperfection at all, anywhere, ever. However, if you answer the above 5 questions, I believe I will be able to see the world through your eyes a little bit to get a better idea of how, where, and why you see things like 'trying', 'failure', and 'imperfection'. Then, once I can kind of see the world through your eyes, I can then offer more personalized, fitting, and helpful advice for you.
 
I'm not religious, but I am reminded of these teachings of Jesus, with which I wholeheartedly agree:
 
 
"Do not judge others, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn others, or it will all come back against you. Forgive others, and you will be forgiven."
(Luke 6:37)
 
 
"Do not judge, or you will be judged. For with the same judgment you pronounce, you will be judged; and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you."
(Matthew 7:1)
 
 
Similarly, here is something I wrote on page 134 of my book:
 
"This dreamy world may be but a mirror. If you look in it with hateful eyes, hateful eyes will hate you back."
 
 
If you answer the 5 numbered questions I've asked above, I believe I will then be able to use my imagination to effectively see the world through your eyes, and look into the mirror that is the world with your eyes and see what you see in that mirror (a.k.a. outer world). Then I can provide some more direct, more personalized, more specific, and more helpful advice.
 
Regardless, my most important advice to you is to stop trying at all. Don't try ever. Fully and completely let go of the miserable illusions of trying and failure. Do your best, and accept the rest. Fully and unconditionally accept everything you cannot control with an acceptance so full and unconditional it warrants the word love.
 
Then, notice that therefore everything is acceptable, exactly as it is. Notice that therefore everything is lovable, exactly as it is. Everything. Just love everything.
 
Every single thing is either (1) to be unconditionally accepted (and loved) as that which you cannot control, or (2) to be accepted and loved as being exactly the way you are choosing for it to be.
 
 
Beyond that, as I already pointed out, your question itself proves you aren't following the numbered suggestions at the end of my book, which are infinitely easy to follow. Namely, that's revealed by your use of the word "try". So I suggest you, right now, immediately choose to start strictly following all eleven of the numbered suggestions at the end of my book.
 
If you do that, you will have invincible free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. unwavering true happiness). It's what some would even call nirvana, enlightenment, or spiritual fulfillment. Or even just grace itself.
 
The choice is 100% yours.
 
It's your proverbial backyard, and you can and will do with it whatever you want.
 
Whichever you choose, I respect and love both you and your choice.
 


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



Unconditional acceptance.png



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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The Advent of Time: A Solution to the Problem of Evil...

The Advent of Time: A Solution to the Problem of Evil...
by Indignus Servus
November 2024

Reconceptualizing Mental Illness in the Digital Age

Reconceptualizing Mental Illness in the Digital Age
by Elliott B. Martin, Jr.
October 2024

How is God Involved in Evolution?

How is God Involved in Evolution?
by Joe P. Provenzano, Ron D. Morgan, and Dan R. Provenzano
August 2024

Launchpad Republic: America's Entrepreneurial Edge and Why It Matters

Launchpad Republic: America's Entrepreneurial Edge and Why It Matters
by Howard Wolk
July 2024

Quest: Finding Freddie: Reflections from the Other Side

Quest: Finding Freddie: Reflections from the Other Side
by Thomas Richard Spradlin
June 2024

Neither Safe Nor Effective

Neither Safe Nor Effective
by Dr. Colleen Huber
May 2024

Now or Never

Now or Never
by Mary Wasche
April 2024

Meditations

Meditations
by Marcus Aurelius
March 2024

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

The In-Between: Life in the Micro

The In-Between: Life in the Micro
by Christian Espinosa
January 2024

2023 Philosophy Books of the Month

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise
by John K Danenbarger
January 2023

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul
by Mitzi Perdue
February 2023

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness
by Chet Shupe
March 2023

The Unfakeable Code®

The Unfakeable Code®
by Tony Jeton Selimi
April 2023

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021