Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

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Abby Young 2
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Abby Young 2 »

I belive that we can only find our true selves once we have been broken. You don't learn anything if everything is handed to you. You learn a lot about yourself if you win or succeed, but you learn even more when you loose or fail. Only then do you learn what makes you you, what your true self is. What is in your heart and soul no matter where or who you are.
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Olga_Markova
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Olga_Markova »

book+lover-people wrote: February 2nd, 2023, 3:02 am When you are broken and at your absolute lowest point in life, that is the moment you realize what you're truly made of. Whether you choose to wallow in self-pity and focus on all the things that went wrong or you shrug and say that didn't work out, pick yourself up, put yourself back together, and try again. It is at this critical moment that you realize your potential.

You can have a million people offering to help you (literally all the king's horses and all the king's men), and yet none of it will help or mean anything if you are unwilling to help yourself.
I fully agree with this view, on both counts. On the first count, I agree that one realises one's own potential at the lowest point in life. And on the second count, I agree that unless the person helps her(him)self, no-one else, including all the king's horses and all the king's men, can help that person. Conversely, when things are all in order, it is very easy to get lost in the illusions of self-perception that mask one's real self.
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan Ekanayake »

Surabhi Rani wrote: January 27th, 2023, 5:09 am I like the point in the poem that 'All the king's horses, And all the king's men, Could not put Humpty Dumpty together again.' It portrays the state of utter helplessness that one is faced with when he or she feels broken on the spiritual path of his or her life. All the glory and magnificence of the world could not replenish Humpty Dumpty's state of existence when he fell off the wall. It is at this point of sheer hopelessness in our cycle of evolution that the secrets of the spiritual world are revealed to us.
I can agree with you. When we are utterly helpless spiritually, there is no one that can help us except our own selves.
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Christal Merkey »

I just finished reading this section. When Humpty Dumpty fell off that wall and no one, not even the king's horses or the king's men, could put him back together, that is basically saying that he hit rock bottom and he needs to find out who he really is. I mean, the stripping away of all the material things is a way to expose someone's weakness, and it can make or break a person. Like they say, what doesn't kill you will make you stronger.
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan »

Christal Merkey wrote: March 2nd, 2023, 4:57 pm I just finished reading this section. When Humpty Dumpty fell off that wall and no one, not even the king's horses or the king's men, could put him back together, that is basically saying that he hit rock bottom and he needs to find out who he really is. I mean, the stripping away of all the material things is a way to expose someone's weakness, and it can make or break a person. Like they say, what doesn't kill you will make you stronger.
While the idea of hitting rock bottom and being stripped of material possessions can lead to a period of self-reflection and discovery, it is not necessarily true that we can only see our true selves when we are broke. Our true selves are not solely defined by our external circumstances or possessions, but rather by our internal thoughts, beliefs, and values. It is possible to know oneself deeply even when one has material wealth and success.

Furthermore, the notion that "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger" can be a dangerous assumption. Trauma and difficult experiences can have long-lasting negative effects on an individual's mental health and well-being. While it is important to learn from challenging situations and to strive for personal growth, it is not necessary to suffer in order to become a stronger person.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Zainab Wasif
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Zainab Wasif »

I think it varies from person to person. It all depends on how self aware a person is and is connected to his inner self. Some of us have to be jolted from our deep slumber by physical and emotional adversity to get connected to our real self. There are some others who don’t need to be made aware of their connection through tough times. They are grounded and truly self-aware of their inner selves.
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan »

Zainab Wasif wrote: March 11th, 2023, 4:15 am I think it varies from person to person. It all depends on how self aware a person is and is connected to his inner self. Some of us have to be jolted from our deep slumber by physical and emotional adversity to get connected to our real self. There are some others who don’t need to be made aware of their connection through tough times. They are grounded and truly self-aware of their inner selves.
Your observation highlights the diversity of human experiences and the varying paths individuals take to achieve self-awareness and connection with their inner selves. As you aptly pointed out, some individuals may require adversity to awaken their consciousness, while others might naturally possess a more grounded sense of self.

This brings to mind the ancient Greek aphorism, "know thyself," which underscores the importance of self-awareness as a foundation for personal growth and fulfillment. It also reminds us of the teachings of Eastern philosophies such as Buddhism and Hinduism, where inner exploration and self-discovery are considered essential for achieving enlightenment and liberation from the cycle of suffering.

The intricate tapestry of human experiences, however, suggests that there might not be a one-size-fits-all approach to self-awareness. Each person's journey towards self-discovery is influenced by their unique combination of nature and nurture, genetics, environment, and personal experiences. As such, the paths towards self-awareness are as diverse as humanity itself.

In this light, it is crucial for individuals to not only recognize and respect their own unique path, but also to remain empathetic towards others who may be on a different journey. This mutual understanding and openness can foster an environment where individuals can grow, learn from each other, and ultimately, find their true selves.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by ahassan_96 »

Perception can be a key determinant in helping us navigate our true selves. How we perceive others and how others perceive us is all a web that can become entangled at times. Being broke is merely a state of consciousness. There are a lot of factors that play a key role in mirroring our actions. For instance, by being honest with ourselves, we can see things from a clear standpoint. Our true self is defined by the state we choose to exist in, thus influencing our state of consciousness. We often develop certain behaviors that might be considered damaging. But if we fail to change the patterns, it results in the state of being broken, repeating the cycle all over again.
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Chinemezu Okafor »

I have never thought of the humpty-dumpty nursery rhyme this way. I don't think one needs to be broken before he can actualize his true self, but I believe that one needs to strip himself to see his true self. I really enjoyed this part of the book.
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

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ahassan_96 wrote: March 17th, 2023, 9:20 am Perception can be a key determinant in helping us navigate our true selves. How we perceive others and how others perceive us is all a web that can become entangled at times. Being broke is merely a state of consciousness. There are a lot of factors that play a key role in mirroring our actions. For instance, by being honest with ourselves, we can see things from a clear standpoint. Our true self is defined by the state we choose to exist in, thus influencing our state of consciousness. We often develop certain behaviors that might be considered damaging. But if we fail to change the patterns, it results in the state of being broken, repeating the cycle all over again.
You raise a valid point about perception and how it shapes our understanding of ourselves and our circumstances. The notion that being "broken" can lead to self-discovery and personal growth is an interesting perspective. It suggests that during challenging times, we may be more inclined to reflect upon our lives and evaluate our priorities, beliefs, and values.

Moreover, the idea that our true selves are revealed when we strip away our ego, material possessions, and societal expectations emphasizes the importance of introspection in understanding our essence. It's possible that we can only truly grasp our authentic selves when we confront adversity or face a crisis that compels us to reevaluate our lives.

The Humpty Dumpty analogy, in this context, serves as a reminder that sometimes, it's through our most challenging moments that we gain the clarity and self-awareness necessary for personal growth and transformation. It underscores the idea that our resilience and ability to adapt in the face of adversity can shape our character and ultimately define who we are.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan »

Chinemezu Okafor wrote: March 17th, 2023, 3:35 pm I have never thought of the humpty-dumpty nursery rhyme this way. I don't think one needs to be broken before he can actualize his true self, but I believe that one needs to strip himself to see his true self. I really enjoyed this part of the book.
It's fascinating to consider how a simple nursery rhyme like Humpty Dumpty can be interpreted in such a profound and philosophical way. While the original intention behind the rhyme might not have been to convey deep philosophical ideas, the beauty of literature and art is that it can be interpreted in various ways by different people, resonating with their unique experiences and perspectives.

You're right in pointing out that one doesn't necessarily have to be broken to actualize their true self. However, challenging moments in life can provide valuable opportunities for introspection and growth. It's often during these times when we're pushed to reassess our priorities and strip away the external factors that may have been clouding our true selves.

The fact that you enjoyed this part of the book highlights how thought-provoking ideas can be found in unexpected places, and how we can draw inspiration from a wide range of sources to better understand ourselves and the world around us.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan »

Amlilui wrote: January 27th, 2023, 10:48 am This reminds me of the beautiful picture book After the Fall (How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again) by Dan Santat. The nursery rhyme definitely leaves interpretation to the listener. I'd never heard anyone wax philosophical about it until I saw Dan's book, which echoes Scott's sentiment from In It Together. Humanity's desire for self-actualization cannot be accomplished in the trappings of ego; our hard, fragile shell. It is only in the transformation that comes from being shattered and realizing there's no going back that one might find salvation.
It's intriguing how the nursery rhyme of Humpty Dumpty can evoke such deep philosophical thoughts and discussions, as seen in both the original comment and Dan Santat's book After the Fall. The idea of self-actualization and transformation through adversity is a powerful one that resonates with many people.

Scott's sentiment in In It Together aligns well with this interpretation of the Humpty Dumpty story. While being shattered or broken might not be a prerequisite for self-actualization, it can serve as a catalyst for growth and change. Stripping away the trappings of ego and external factors allows us to see our true selves more clearly.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

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Knitkat wrote: January 28th, 2023, 6:46 pm I don't think we have to be completely broken in order to see our true selves. I think there are ways to peel back the layers without falling apart, though I do think that when we have broken to pick up the pieces we need to find ourselves or there's no way to heal that is meaningful.
You make a valid point that complete brokenness is not always necessary for self-discovery. It is true that we can peel back the layers of our identity and ego through introspection, meditation, or even conversations with trusted friends and mentors. In doing so, we can gradually gain a deeper understanding of our true selves.

However, it's also important to acknowledge that for some individuals, facing adversity or experiencing a significant setback might serve as a catalyst for change and self-discovery. In such cases, the process of healing and rebuilding oneself can lead to a more profound understanding of one's true identity.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan »

Julie Gebrosky wrote: January 29th, 2023, 9:24 pm
Tara D Morgan wrote: January 29th, 2023, 10:26 am I don't understand this question and how it fits with Humpty Dumpty. The rhyme dates back to England in 1797 and is believed to have started as a riddle - What once broken can't be put back together again? - An egg!
I agree with you completely! I think you’re right. Otherwise it wouldn’t make sense because nowhere in the nursery rhyme is Humpy Dumpty identified as an egg. I remember reading somewhere a while ago about people speculating where we even got the notion that he was an egg. After all, doesn’t it seem odd that we would have an egg sitting on a wall that all the king’s horses and men would want to piece back together in the first place? Of course, he’s always depicted as an egg in drawings for some reason.
You're right; it's fascinating how the image of Humpty Dumpty as an egg has become ingrained in our collective consciousness despite not being explicitly mentioned in the original nursery rhyme. This could be attributed to the power of visual representation and how illustrations accompanying the rhyme have influenced our perception of the character over time.

As for the philosophical discussion surrounding Humpty Dumpty, it's interesting to see how people can draw deeper meaning from a seemingly simple nursery rhyme. While the original intent of the rhyme may not have been to spark introspection and self-discovery, the fact that it can be interpreted in various ways demonstrates the versatility and adaptability of literature and storytelling. In this case, using Humpty Dumpty as a metaphor for personal growth and self-awareness allows for a thought-provoking conversation that transcends the original context of the rhyme.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

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Re: Does Humpty-Dumpty say that we see our true selves only when we are broke?

Post by Sushan »

Amy Luman wrote: January 29th, 2023, 10:22 pm If you are talking about the fairy tale then I don’t really know what you mean. Humpty Dumpty is a fictional character with no real insight. However, if this is a comparison then I do think that people only see what is real about themselves when things don’t go according to plan. It’s easy to be content when everything is “as it should be.”
I agree with your perspective on the matter. While Humpty Dumpty as a character might not have any inherent wisdom, the concept of the nursery rhyme can still be used as a metaphor to discuss the idea of personal growth through adversity. It is often in times of struggle and hardship that we are forced to confront our true selves, evaluate our priorities, and reexamine our beliefs.

Using Humpty Dumpty as an allegory for personal growth allows us to engage in a deeper conversation about self-discovery and finding inner strength. So, while the nursery rhyme itself might not have been intended as a philosophical piece, it has the potential to spark thought-provoking discussions about the human experience and how adversity can lead to a greater understanding of ourselves.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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