The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

This is a discussion forum topic for the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.


The idea that "there is no problem of evil", when realized as true, enables both atheists and theists alike to accept, appreciate, and love reality as a whole--especially in terms of eternal unchanging timeless 4D spacetime (a.k.a. the universe)--as if it was created by an omnipotent all-loving god, regardless of whether or not they believe that to be literally true.

When you look at the world like that, you loving appreciate the harmonious perfect beauty of the universe as a perfect eternal unchanging timeless 4D whole, including all of spacetime including both the parts of it in your relative past versus in your relative future at any given moment, or to your relative left versus to your relative right at any given moment. You appreciate and love the world as a perfect beautiful unchanging eternal whole.

A crucial part of this way of looking at things comes from fully and unconditionally accepting what one cannot change and cannot control (e.g. the past). This means accepting what you didn't choose as if you chose it.

When you fully accept the proverbial cards you have been dealt, it means you are accepting and appreciating those cards as if you chose to have been dealt them.

Assuming you also accept your actual choices as if you chose them, which makes sense since you did in fact choose them, then that means you accept everything as if you chose it.

That is an idea worth repeating: It means you accept everything as if you chose it. Everything.

We can swap out the word acceptance with love, which is arguably more applicable for the kind of full unconditional graceful inner-peace-providing all-forgiving acceptance. Then it is loving everything. Indeed, a whole chapter of the book is titled, "Just Love Everything".

You are omnipotent over your choices, meaning you are 100% in control of your choices and always get what you choose when it comes to your choices. Thus, when you also consider the unchosen aspects of reality (i.e. that which you know you cannot change) as if it was chosen by you, then everything appears like it was made by an omnipotent all-loving being who not only did choose everything but chose to make it exactly how you would have. It's as if there is an all-known all-powerful all-loving god with a divine plan writing the dramatic story of your current one human life, and of all life.

When you unconditionally fully accept unchangeable reality (i.e. the unchosen, meaning what you don't control), then the following becomes revealed:

Everything is as acceptable to you as the choices you are making in your present.

You are as contently at peace with the whole world as you are with your choices in your present.



---
The book is available for purchase from all major book retailers in both ebook and hardcover format.
Image
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
trevorlando
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Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by trevorlando »

This initial post makes me think about perspective and outlook relating to beauty. Wouldn't it be great if everyone looked at the world positively, with no eye towards evil? It would be spectacular to live in a world where no attention is shown towards the concept of evil; this would be great considering that there is no true concept or problem of evil. It is the first step towards positivity to recognize that there is no problem that surrounds evil. Wake up!
Hazel Mae Bagarinao
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Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Hazel Mae Bagarinao »

Scott wrote:When you look at the world like that, you loving appreciate the harmonious perfect beauty of the universe as a perfect eternal unchanging timeless 4D whole, including all of spacetime including both the parts of it in your relative past versus in your relative future at any given moment, or to your relative left versus to your relative right at any given moment. You appreciate and love the world as a perfect beautiful unchanging eternal whole.
The world is perfect on its own, just like a person on its own. It's in the mind who defines that perfection.
Okoth David
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Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Okoth David »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: December 15th, 2022, 7:23 pm This is a discussion forum topic for the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.


The idea that "there is no problem of evil", when realized as true, enables both atheists and theists alike to accept, appreciate, and love reality as a whole--especially in terms of eternal unchanging timeless 4D spacetime (a.k.a. the universe)--as if it was created by an omnipotent all-loving god, regardless of whether or not they believe that to be literally true.

When you look at the world like that, you loving appreciate the harmonious perfect beauty of the universe as a perfect eternal unchanging timeless 4D whole, including all of spacetime including both the parts of it in your relative past versus in your relative future at any given moment, or to your relative left versus to your relative right at any given moment. You appreciate and love the world as a perfect beautiful unchanging eternal whole.

A crucial part of this way of looking at things comes from fully and unconditionally accepting what one cannot change and cannot control (e.g. the past). This means accepting what you didn't choose as if you chose it.

When you fully accept the proverbial cards you have been dealt, it means you are accepting and appreciating those cards as if you chose to have been dealt them.

Assuming you also accept your actual choices as if you chose them, which makes sense since you did in fact choose them, then that means you accept everything as if you chose it.

That is an idea worth repeating: It means you accept everything as if you chose it. Everything.

We can swap out the word acceptance with love, which is arguably more applicable for the kind of full unconditional graceful inner-peace-providing all-forgiving acceptance. Then it is loving everything. Indeed, a whole chapter of the book is titled, "Just Love Everything".

You are omnipotent over your choices, meaning you are 100% in control of your choices and always get what you choose when it comes to your choices. Thus, when you also consider the unchosen aspects of reality (i.e. that which you know you cannot change) as if it was chosen by you, then everything appears like it was made by an omnipotent all-loving being who not only did choose everything but chose to make it exactly how you would have. It's as if there is an all-known all-powerful all-loving god with a divine plan writing the dramatic story of your current one human life, and of all life.

When you unconditionally fully accept unchangeable reality (i.e. the unchosen, meaning what you don't control), then the following becomes revealed:

Everything is as acceptable to you as the choices you are making in your present.

You are as contently at peace with the whole world as you are with your choices in your present.



---
The book is available for purchase from all major book retailers in both ebook and hardcover format.
Image



Realizing there's no inherent problem of evil can lead to a profound shift in perspective. It allows us to explore the concept of morality without the burden of an absolute moral contradiction. Embracing this view can open discussions about subjective interpretations of good and evil, fostering a deeper understanding of diverse perspectives on morality and ethics.
Agoms Collins
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Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Agoms Collins »

The "problem of evil" is a big question people ask about why bad things happen if there is a good and powerful God. Some people think this is a huge problem that can't be solved. But there's a different way to look at it: what if there's no real problem of evil at all? This idea can change how we see the world in a very positive way.

First, if we believe there’s no problem of evil, it means we stop seeing bad things as proof that the world is messed up or that a good God can’t exist. Instead, we start thinking about how we can deal with these bad things. This shift in thinking can make us stronger and more determined to make things better. For example, if we see suffering or injustice, we might be more motivated to help others and improve our community instead of just feeling hopeless.

The beauty of this idea is that it helps us connect better with other people. When we accept that everyone faces tough times, we become more understanding and compassionate. We realize that everyone has their own battles, which can bring us closer together. Instead of seeing life’s hardships as unfair or pointless, we start seeing them as chances to grow and become better people.

Also, this way of thinking can help us appreciate life’s ups and downs more fully. Life is a mix of good and bad experiences, and both are important. Difficult times can teach us valuable lessons and make us stronger. By accepting that life isn’t supposed to be perfect, we can find meaning and beauty even in the tough moments.

Some philosophies, like Buddhism, teach that suffering is a natural part of life and can lead to greater understanding and enlightenment. These teachings suggest that accepting life’s challenges can help us find deeper peace and happiness.

In short, believing that there’s no problem of evil helps us focus on what we can do to make the world better and grow as individuals. It encourages us to be kind, understanding, and resilient. This mindset can bring more peace and beauty into our lives, making us stronger and more connected to each other.
Miracle Kingss
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Joined: April 11th, 2024, 7:30 am

Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Miracle Kingss »

I disagree with the assertion that evil does not exist. I have witnessed evil deeds committed by people who truly enjoy them. Consider a group of men who created a video in which they inserted a long stick, vodka, and chilli into a girl's vagina. This killed her. That is the correct definition of evil.
Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango
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Joined: November 16th, 2023, 7:28 pm

Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango »

Always be at peace with your choices and accept them because there us nothing you can do about something that is already done. Also, have inner peace
Nancy004
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Joined: July 4th, 2023, 7:05 pm

Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Nancy004 »

I appreciate your perspective on acceptance and loving the world as it is. Embracing everything as if we chose it can indeed bring a profound sense of peace. However, for many, the existence of suffering and evil is a significant challenge. While acceptance fosters resilience, we must also strive to alleviate suffering. Balancing acceptance with active efforts to improve the world might offer a more holistic path to inner peace and collective well-being. This way, we can find peace within ourselves while contributing positively to others.
Julius Peters
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Joined: May 21st, 2024, 4:45 pm

Re: The importance and beauty in realizing there is no problem of evil

Post by Julius Peters »

Your perspective on the problem of evil and acceptance of reality presents an intriguing blend of philosophical and spiritual concepts, drawing on ideas from stoicism, existentialism, and perhaps even aspects of Eastern philosophies like Buddhism. Here are some reflections on the key points you’ve made:

Problem of Evil: The idea that "there is no problem of evil" when fully realized allows both atheists and theists to appreciate reality as a harmonious, perfect whole. This perspective shifts the focus from the existence of evil to a holistic acceptance of reality. For theists, it might align with the belief in a benevolent deity's grand design, while for atheists, it might mean embracing the universe as it is, without attributing suffering to a moral flaw in its creation.

Timeless 4D Spacetime: Viewing the universe as a perfect, unchanging, eternal 4D whole aligns with the concept of block time in physics, where past, present, and future are equally real. This perspective can foster a sense of acceptance and peace, as it emphasizes the beauty and perfection of the entire spacetime continuum.

Acceptance and Choice: Accepting what one cannot change, such as the past, as if one chose it, is a powerful tool for inner peace. This idea echoes stoic philosophy, where the focus is on differentiating between what we can and cannot control and accepting the latter with equanimity. It also resonates with the existentialist notion of embracing one’s freedom and the consequences of one’s choices.

Unconditional Acceptance and Love: Transforming acceptance into love can lead to a profound sense of inner peace and forgiveness. By loving everything, including the unchangeable aspects of reality, one can achieve a state of grace and contentment. This unconditional acceptance aligns with the idea of amor fati (love of fate) in stoicism and the Buddhist practice of loving-kindness (metta).

Omnipotence over Choices: Recognizing one's complete control over their choices and extending that sense of acceptance to the unchosen aspects of reality creates a sense of unity and harmony. This perspective can provide a sense of agency and empowerment, while also fostering a deep acceptance of life's circumstances.

Divine Plan and Contentment: The metaphor of an all-knowing, all-powerful, all-loving god with a divine plan can serve as a comforting narrative, even for those who do not literally believe in such a deity. It suggests that everything in the universe, including one's life, is unfolding exactly as it should, leading to a deep sense of contentment and peace.

In conclusion, your approach emphasizes the transformative power of acceptance and love in achieving a harmonious and peaceful outlook on life. By reframing one's relationship with reality—both the chosen and the unchosen—one can find profound contentment and appreciation for the universe as a whole. This perspective can be particularly beneficial for those seeking to reconcile their experiences with a sense of deeper meaning and peace.
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