We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

To post in this forum, you must buy and read the book. After buying the book, please email a copy of your receipt to [email protected] to be given access to this forum.
Forum rules
This forum is for discussing the book In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All. Anyone can view the forum and read the post, but only people who purchased the book can post in the forum.

If your purchased has not already been verified, please email a copy of your receipt to [email protected] to be given access to this forum.
Salah bourouba
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: November 3rd, 2022, 10:24 am

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Salah bourouba »

Definitely. This quotes falled best on angry people. Because they tend to see or believe only what they think is true. And don't leave the chance for people to explain the actual truth.

There are blessings even in the smallest things. Like bees the blessing the provide for us with honey is unimaginable. So all y. Have to do is recognize those blessings and be grateful for them.
Masedi Mabilu
Premium Member
Posts: 4
Joined: January 17th, 2023, 5:44 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Masedi Mabilu »

I think the fact that we see what we want to see does not necessarily mean we always see things differently from the way others see them. Sometimes we can see something the same way because we are looking from the same mindset.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5709
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Sugar Rush wrote: March 5th, 2023, 7:08 pm Sometimes we see things not because that is what we want to see. For instance, I may be having a very good day only to discover that someone damaged my laptop, of course I would get offended, not because I wanted to be offended or set about seeking for what should offend me but because that is enough to get one offended don't you think?
Hi, Sugar Rush,

Thank you for your reply! :)

Can you explain a bit more what you mean by the word 'offended' as you use it above? How would you define the word offended?

As human beings, there are some feelings we will each regularly and unavoidably feel over and over again throughout our lives, such as pain, hunger, discomfort, fear, and anger. Are you talking about one of those?

Due to sensory adaptation, you will feel such feelings (e.g. discomfort and comfort) with about the same frequency regardless of what happens in the outer world. I mention this in the book with a fun example of someone with gold toilet paper still getting sad and still crying and wanting more wealth and such.

Choosing to resent the unavoidable feelings and/or engage in expectation and blame is where the choice might come in and where it can be revealed as an aspect of projection (i.e. seeing what you choose to see).

Do you feel pain or frustration because your laptop broke, or would you inevitably feel pain, hunger, discomfort, and frustration regardless of what happens simply because you are human and such feelings are unavoidable for humans? Is the laptop breaking to blame, or is that a projection? Did you have an expectation that the laptop not break and/or that you would not feel offended? If so, I invite to also read and reply to my topic about letting go of expectation and blame.

Anything that disappears from view or looks different once you choose to let go of expectation and blame is then therefore revealed as something that was a matter of projection all along.

I hope this helps. :)


Thank you,
Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5709
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

beckybelvin wrote: February 4th, 2023, 9:20 am I don't choose to see the world as it is today. I am a teacher and there has been a steady decline in student behavior, as well as respect from the parents. This has caused teacher burnout and the quality of education to go down. Also, we see wars, murders, rapes, the killing of innocent babies, etc. every day. I would like to think that no one chooses to see that. I know I don't, but it's our reality.
Hi, beckybelvin

Thank you for your reply! :)

I don't doubt that it is your reality. But how sure are you that it is our reality? 90%? 95%? 99%? 99.9%? 100%?

A few years ago, I read the book The Moral Arc: How Science Makes Us Better People by Michael Shermer. I didn't agree with much of the philosophy in the book, but the historical facts and statistics were very enlightening. The topic is much broader than kids' behavior in schools, but I still think the mathematical statistical well-researched facts he presented contradict your anecdotal view that things are getting worse by such measures. I recommend you read it. Even if, like me, you don't agree with much of it, I think it will give you a new perspective on many things, just like it did for me. I learn more by reading things with which I disagree than agree. If I'm the choir, there isn't much value to me in listening to a preacher preach to me (the choir).

Do you think the average school-age child in your district is more violent than they were 25 years ago or 50 years ago or 100 years ago? Surely, there are actual measurable statistics that can be checked. We don't just need to rely on a gut feeling or personal anecdotal experience.

What about racist and sexist? Are kids more or less racist and/or sexist than they were 50 years ago?

Were kids better behaved when schools were racially segregated and women could only go to women's colleges? That's not a rhetorical question. What do you think? What about when they first got unsegregated; were kids better behaved in the freshly desegregated schools than they are now?

When did the downturn that you believe exists first start and how long has it been going on?

My son is learning math that didn't even exist for much of human history. Einstein didn't prove Newton wrong until only about 100 years ago, for example, and Newton invented Calculus which itself isn't that old.

When I went to visit my daughter's kindergarten class while she was in kindergarten, I was utterly shocked at how incredibly well those little kids could read whole books. I didn't remember learning to read that level until I was in 2nd or 3rd grade myself, and I read at above grade level, at least for what was considered grade level at my time.

Is it possible that some of what's contributing to your perception as a teacher of a downturn is actually the result of the opposite: That, rather than parents and kids performing worse in relation to some steady bar, instead the bar itself has been drastically and steadily raised, making things seem worse in comparison and thereby putting more pressure and weight on the shoulders of students, parents, and (perhaps most of all) teachers like you?

We only did half-day kindergarten when I was in kindergarten, but my kids did full-day kindergarten.



Thank you,
Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5709
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

book+lover-people wrote: February 2nd, 2023, 12:16 am While we do see what we want to see, it is also true that we are trained by the people around us to see things in a particular light. The more time you spend with someone negative, the more inclined you will be to allow thoughts that focus on the negative aspects of life. If, from youth, you observed your mom and dad constantly comparing where they are in life to others and concentrating on all the things they lack. Often you will find that you have developed some of these traits yourself.
That is so true, and you are wise to point it out!

As people often say, misery loves company.

Smiles and frowns are both contagious.

book+lover-people wrote: February 2nd, 2023, 12:16 am Then, you have to be willing to analyze yourself, your mindset, and your perceptions of life, then decide whether or not you like yourself. Then it takes time and effort. You have to be vigilant and watch the thoughts that enter your mind.

My grandmother always had this habit; when she would find herself saying things aloud or having unkind thoughts, she would raise her right hand in the air and say, "Cancel. Cancel. Cancel." This method worked because it was a constant reminder to watch her thoughts. Whenever she allowed an unkind or self-deprecating thought, it was a verbal reminder to cancel the energy and the associated habit.
That's a helpful tip! :D
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Kendal Low
Premium Member
Posts: 12
Joined: March 10th, 2023, 2:52 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Kendal Low »

I completely agree with this way of thinking. It's like when you're thinking about, for example, yellow cars; you will notice all of the yellow cars around you. Whatever you are subconsciously looking for you will find.
User avatar
Chinemezu Okafor
Premium Member
Posts: 11
Joined: March 13th, 2023, 3:12 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Chinemezu Okafor »

This is actually very true. If we are angry, we see reasons to be angry, and if we are happy, we see reasons to be happy. This is the way the human mind operates. This is actually helpful because there was this time I was very happy, and something uneventful happened that day; I refused to be sad or angry; instead, I looked for reasons to be happy because I was happy.
User avatar
Covenant Olusegun
Premium Member
Posts: 16
Joined: March 14th, 2023, 7:11 am

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Covenant Olusegun »

I agree with you, but there's a place of peace and inner settling too if we do something wrong and choose to see that it has something right. Let us see wrong as wrong and right as right, and let us be true and honest to our feelings as much as we want to see the world as beautiful as possible. 
User avatar
lec_nemanja
Premium Member
Posts: 13
Joined: March 10th, 2023, 5:50 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by lec_nemanja »

We see what we want to see in accordance with our habits, interests, and current situation. If we're late for work, all we'll see are traffic lights, traffic, the speed limit, and time ticking away. If we are in the park and have time, we will see other things: the beauty of nature, parents with children, and dogs running around.
User avatar
lec_nemanja
Premium Member
Posts: 13
Joined: March 10th, 2023, 5:50 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by lec_nemanja »

I completely agree, we should be grateful always and everywhere for everything. I believe that this is a way to become more humble and satisfied with ourselves.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5709
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

lec_nemanja wrote: March 25th, 2023, 6:07 am We see what we want to see in accordance with our habits, interests, and current situation. If we're late for work, all we'll see are traffic lights, traffic, the speed limit, and time ticking away. If we are in the park and have time, we will see other things: the beauty of nature, parents with children, and dogs running around.
Those are great wise examples! :D
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Zainab Wasif
Premium Member
Posts: 12
Joined: March 7th, 2023, 4:05 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Zainab Wasif »

We see what we want to see. It is based on our perspective as well as our current state of mind. While most of us would be quick to judge things based on our current state of mind, some others would weigh it based on their experience and understanding. It is often said that, “Don’t make any promises when you are happy and don’t make a decision when you are sad”. Yet, there are people who would not let their present state of mind cloud their behaviour or judgement.
User avatar
Nisha DSouza
Premium Member
Posts: 20
Joined: March 16th, 2023, 12:55 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Nisha DSouza »

I completely agree with this and wholeheartedly believe it too. If we choose to see the blessings in our life, we are blessed more. Likewise, the more we curse our fate for things that didn't go our way, we are bound to attract more of an unpleasant fate.
User avatar
Catalina Isabel
Premium Member
Posts: 32
Joined: April 12th, 2023, 2:21 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by Catalina Isabel »

I do agree with this quote. I think we often see what we are currently thinking of, and our state of mind alters this. For example; when you're pregnant, you see lots more pregnant people around. When you're in love, you can't stop thinking of that person, and you suddenly notice more people who are also in love.
When we are in a good state of mind I think we are more able to accept things as they truly are. When we are rushed, upset or feel other negative emotions it can blind us.
User avatar
sam_rahman12
Premium Member
Posts: 12
Joined: April 21st, 2023, 1:52 pm

Re: We see what we want to see, meaning what we choose to see.

Post by sam_rahman12 »

This is so true. If we look for positives, we see positives. If we keep on finding negatives, it is because we want to see the negatives. Your entire perspective depends on this small and undeniable phenomena. The more ways we find to think and live happily and positively, the better our lives are going to turn out.
Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes”

2023/2024 Philosophy Books of the Month

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise
by John K Danenbarger
January 2023

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul
by Mitzi Perdue
February 2023

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness
by Chet Shupe
March 2023

The Unfakeable Code®

The Unfakeable Code®
by Tony Jeton Selimi
April 2023

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021