Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

In It Together (Page 4) wrote: Some would call it, simply, the human condition.

If the word “suffering” simply means having unfulfilled desire, then to be human is to suffer. That is because when one fulfills their current desires, more desires emerge. When one reaches their current goals, their mind creates new ones. “To live is to suffer,” as Nietzsche put it. You will quicker find a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow than find happiness through achieving goals and fulfilling desires, be they for money, fame, sex, procreation, or whatever. There is always more money to make or more fame to achieve. It is a constant, endless chain of desire. If you get this then you will want that, and if you get that then you will want this, or something else, something more. You cannot eliminate desire by fulfilling desire. Fulfillment causes desire and goals to be replaced, not eliminated. You cannot achieve a state of goallessness by achieving goals. So long as you live as a human, you will have unfulfilled desires and unachieved goals, as the human body and mind will always want more and will invariably create new goals once old goals have been achieved. To be alive is in part to be at war and to struggle.
Penny Ann Criswell Johnson wrote: June 19th, 2024, 3:05 pm I didn't understand the first topic on page 4: "You will quicker find a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow than find happiness through achieving goals and fulfilling desires."

I find that those who set goals for their lives can find happiness once that goal is achieved. For example, it may be someone's life goal to get their PHD, and once that is achieved, they can move forward with that degree. That doesn't mean they need to get another PHD but enjoy the one they have. Another example is someone could want six children (me), and once they achieve that goal, they do not need to set another baby goal. My parents were very simple people. My dad wanted to own his house when I was small, and once he did that, his goal was fulfilled. He didn't ever buy another house or set another goal. People can be happy once a goal is fulfilled.


Hi, Penny Ann Criswell Johnson,

Thank you for your reply. I have some questions about your alleged counter-examples:


How long did your father live without having any goals at all?

Was he diagnosed with clinical depression?

Often when someone appears to have absolutely no goals or desires (e.g. they just lay around doing nothing because they seem to have no goals or desires) they would be diagnosed with clinical depression.

After he stopped having goals and desires, did he starve to death?




With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: January 19th, 2023, 3:04 pm
Important Note: Before posting in this topic, please do make sure you have looked up any words or phrases with which you aren't familiar in the dictionary and/or encyclopedia. You can do this in seconds online using your preferred search engine (e.g. Google or DuckDuckGo).

Do you feel you understood every sentence in the book, In It Together? In other words, do you feel you understand what the author (me) meant by every single sentence in the book?

If not, please quote the very first sentence or very first paragraph you do not understand. Then I will do my best to explain and clarify what I meant by it.

[...]

When replying, please provide your best guess(es) about what you think the sentence probably means. Then, from there, I can let you know which of your guesses (if you have more than one) is correct or closest to correct and/or I can then, based on your guess(es), know what was missed or misunderstood to then know how to clarify it for you.
Christell Lindeque wrote: June 20th, 2024, 7:29 am The following is my first quote "If you feel a battle between your so-called higher self and so-called lower self, I ask you to stop fighting the so-called lower self and embrace the so-called lower self, but more than that to realize that even to call something the 'higher' or 'lower' self is to draw a battle line and start a fight, to needlessly attack your own shadow and bitterly chase your own tail."

Hi, Christell Lindeque,

Thank you for your questions. :)

I am a bit confused because the sentence you quoted as the very first that you don't understand is from page 99 in the book, which would mean you are saying you did understand every single sentence from the first 98 pages of the book.

Is that correct?

If so, then I am still very confused, namely because the phrase "high self" appears three times before that earlier in the book, and likewise the phrase "lower self" appears three times before page 99.

So if you didn't understand what those phrases meant on page 99, how did you understand what they meant the other three times they were used earlier?





With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Moisés Alcántara Ayre wrote: June 20th, 2024, 7:57 am Thanks, Scott.
 
To my not understanding a sentence in your book, You replied the following:
 
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) wrote: you don't need to believe in god.
I really don't understand # 1. As a Christian, believing in God is what has changed my whole life for the better, and without Him, everything was not life at its fullest. Having being created in the likeness of God motivates me every day: His Word in the Bible lights all darkness.

I hope you can help clarify,

Moises
Hi, Moisés Alcántara Ayre,

Thank you for your reply.

Technically, I believe the above sentence and point cannot possibly be the first one that you don't understand and/or disagree with. That's because there are other earlier sentences in the book in which I state my firm belief and teaching that "there is nothing you must do". Here are some examples:


"There is nothing you need to do." (Page 84)

"The incessant anxious feeling like something needs to be done, something must be done, or something is lacking are all symptoms of discontent." (117)

"Nothing must be done that isn’t done." (Page 132)

"Must and choice are incompatible. Nothing must be done that isn’t done." (Page 135)


Nonetheless, I will soon answer your general question about this in a separate topic dedicated to this specific topic, meaning the topic of allegedly needing to believe in God in relation to my claim that there is nothing at all ever that you need to do.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: January 19th, 2023, 3:04 pm Important Note: Before posting in this topic, please do make sure you have looked up any words or phrases with which you aren't familiar in the dictionary and/or encyclopedia. You can do this in seconds online using your preferred search engine (e.g. Google or DuckDuckGo).

[...]

When replying, please provide your best guess(es) about what you think the sentence probably means. Then, from there, I can let you know which of your guesses (if you have more than one) is correct or closest to correct and/or I can then, based on your guess(es), know what was missed or misunderstood to then know how to clarify it for you.
Meena Jangid wrote: June 21st, 2024, 8:25 am That is not a reference to some kind of philosophical metaphysical dualism. Rather, the truths in this book are agreeable to metaphysical dualists and monists alike. One could even argue that the differences between most forms of dualism and monism are merely semantics. In fact, some philosophers argue that all philosophy is just word games.
Hi, Meena Jangid,

To help you, I would need more info, per the instruction in the OP (Original Post).

Namely, did you look the words and terms up in the dictionary and/or encyclopedia? If so, what were the results?

And what is your best guess about what the sentence means?


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Ruka N wrote: June 20th, 2024, 6:23 pm Hello, Scott. Please could you elaborate on the paragraph
"Without the warmth of true consciousness, even apparent altruism would be nothing more than a cold superficial approximated falsehood unconsciously emerging from fundamental selfish cancer-like cyclical process and feedback loops, runaway aspects of natural selection, such as selfish genes causing the host to kill itself to perpetuate the genome"
Thank you!
Hi, Ruka N,

Thank you for your question! :)

Would it be more clear if I reworded that sentence into the following paragraph:
 
"Without the warmth of true consciousness, even apparent altruism would be nothing more than a cold superficial approximated falsehood unconsciously emerging from fundamentally selfish but unconscious processes. There would be no true self, meaning no consciousness, for the selfishness to be selfish in relation to. Rather, it would be mechanical unconscious selfishness, such as in the sense of talking about selfish genes causing the host to kill itself to perpetuate the genome. An unconscious, robotic, zombie mother may throw herself to death to save her baby, but that is not true conscious love. And the self that she throws to death is only a body without a spirit. It couldn’t be true conscious love if there was no consciousness, by definition. It would just be the false appearance of true love from fundamentally selfish and unloving processes of natural selection and evolution. They are cancer-like cyclical processes and feedback loops, runaway aspects of natural selection."
 
?



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by rajesh kumar jain »

I wondered what common struggle could unite all humans, especially since some people seem to have no struggles. However, after finishing the book, I gained a clearer understanding of the universal themes it addresses.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Christell Lindeque »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: June 21st, 2024, 2:59 pm
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: January 19th, 2023, 3:04 pm
Important Note: Before posting in this topic, please do make sure you have looked up any words or phrases with which you aren't familiar in the dictionary and/or encyclopedia. You can do this in seconds online using your preferred search engine (e.g. Google or DuckDuckGo).

Do you feel you understood every sentence in the book, In It Together? In other words, do you feel you understand what the author (me) meant by every single sentence in the book?

If not, please quote the very first sentence or very first paragraph you do not understand. Then I will do my best to explain and clarify what I meant by it.

[...]

When replying, please provide your best guess(es) about what you think the sentence probably means. Then, from there, I can let you know which of your guesses (if you have more than one) is correct or closest to correct and/or I can then, based on your guess(es), know what was missed or misunderstood to then know how to clarify it for you.
Christell Lindeque wrote: June 20th, 2024, 7:29 am The following is my first quote "If you feel a battle between your so-called higher self and so-called lower self, I ask you to stop fighting the so-called lower self and embrace the so-called lower self, but more than that to realize that even to call something the 'higher' or 'lower' self is to draw a battle line and start a fight, to needlessly attack your own shadow and bitterly chase your own tail."

Hi, Christell Lindeque,

Thank you for your questions. :)

I am a bit confused because the sentence you quoted as the very first that you don't understand is from page 99 in the book, which would mean you are saying you did understand every single sentence from the first 98 pages of the book.

Is that correct?

If so, then I am still very confused, namely because the phrase "high self" appears three times before that earlier in the book, and likewise the phrase "lower self" appears three times before page 99.

So if you didn't understand what those phrases meant on page 99, how did you understand what they meant the other three times they were used earlier?





With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
I apologize. I quoted a sentence relating to my biggest question in your book that I did not understand.

Do I understand correctly that your spiritual self is your higher self?

What exactly does lower self mean? You mention its the ego.

Can you explain them in simple terms what both means. I struggle to grasp it when it gets explained in such detail that I seem to lose concentration. I am someone who understands things when its straight to the point.

I believe your writing is very beautiful. Its just not straight to the point.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: January 19th, 2023, 3:04 pm Do you feel you understood every sentence in the book, In It Together? In other words, do you feel you understand what the author (me) meant by every single sentence in the book?

If not, please quote the very first sentence or very first paragraph you do not understand. Then I will do my best to explain and clarify what I meant by it.
Christell Lindeque wrote: June 20th, 2024, 7:29 am The following is my first quote "If you feel a battle between your so-called higher self and so-called lower self, I ask you to stop fighting the so-called lower self and embrace the so-called lower self, but more than that to realize that even to call something the 'higher' or 'lower' self is to draw a battle line and start a fight, to needlessly attack your own shadow and bitterly chase your own tail."
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: June 21st, 2024, 2:59 pm I am a bit confused because the sentence you quoted as the very first that you don't understand is from page 99 in the book [...]

the phrase "higher self" appears three times before that earlier in the book, and likewise the phrase "lower self" appears three times before page 99.
Christell Lindeque wrote: June 26th, 2024, 2:14 am I apologize. I quoted a sentence relating to my biggest question in your book that I did not understand.

Hi, Christell Lindeque,

Please don't quote a sentence that you don't understand.

Instead, please quote the very first sentence you don't understand, meaning the sentence closest to the beginning of the book.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Angel Sandra »

Honestly, I understand everything, I was very engrossed in the quotes and new things I could learn. Thank you Scott
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Mcbride6841 »

You have answered some of my concerns regarding your book, In It Together, thank you.
I have a question from page 74.
From line 17 to line 20, how do you jump to saying the humans on the other side of the planet are you, in terms of the real you, just as much as the human you see in the mirror. Won’t they be the real them in the future just like I will be the real me?
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Kutloano Makhuvhela »

Yes. The language used here was very efficient and simple to understand. Even a person like me, who is not well versed in philosophy, I was able to read it and understand all the points you were making. Most books always utilises jargon, ending up intimidating the reader. I am happy that is not the case with this book.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Abdm28 »

I feel like I'm the one talked about. This particular line in the book is like: "The comfort zone is a sticky dark trap, a spiritual prison for those who aren't careful." You aren't carful in what manner. I just need some clarification here. (Page 54).
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: January 19th, 2023, 3:04 pm

Do you feel you understood every sentence in the book, In It Together? In other words, do you feel you understand what the author (me) meant by every single sentence in the book?

If not, please quote the very first sentence or very first paragraph you do not understand.

[...]

When replying, please provide your best guess(es) about what you think the sentence probably means.
Mcbride6841 wrote: June 28th, 2024, 7:26 pm You have answered some of my concerns regarding your book, In It Together, thank you.
I have a question from page 74.
From line 17 to line 20, how do you jump to saying the humans on the other side of the planet are you, in terms of the real you, just as much as the human you see in the mirror. Won’t they be the real them in the future just like I will be the real me?
Hi, Mcbride6841,

Thank you for your question.

Are you sure that is the very first sentence that you do not understand?

In other words, you are saying you did understand every single sentence on pages 1 - 73; correct?

If so, then please also answer the other questions in the OP (Original Post), such as telling what your best guess(es) of the meaning of the sentence is/are.




With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Abdm28 wrote: June 29th, 2024, 10:42 am I feel like I'm the one talked about. This particular line in the book is like: "The comfort zone is a sticky dark trap, a spiritual prison for those who aren't careful." You aren't carful in what manner. I just need some clarification here. (Page 54).
Hi, Abdm28,

Thank you for your question.

If I re-word that section to the following, will this be more clear:
In It Together (3rd Edition, Draft) wrote: The job will one day end. The car will one day be sold for parts. The most attractive fashion model in the world will age, wrinkle, and scar. Even the happiest marriage in the world will end soon enough, by death or divorce.

It's those human beings with the prettiest faces and the most expensive cars, the most esteemed jobs, and the most glamorous wardrobes, who will tend to find the above words hardest to hear. The comfort zone is a sticky dark trap, a spiritual prison for those who aren't careful.

“Careful in what way?”, one might ask. The answer: Careful in the same way one could be careful with any addictive activity, behavior, or substance. Careful in the way one with a familial history of alcoholism might be careful with alcohol or bars. Careful in the way one with a history of gambling addiction might be careful at a casino. Careful in the way a human with a history of cowardice might be careful with fear and scary activities and the comfort of safety. All humans are on the addiction spectrum, some more than others. The specific props in each human’s struggle with addiction (a.k.a. spiritual slavery) vary, but perhaps the most fundamental addiction is comfort addiction, meaning the addiction to comfort. The coward (i.e. slave to fear) gets it from caving to fear and avoiding the discomfort of feeling fear. The alcoholic gets it from alcohol, the sex addict from sex, the overeating food addict from food, and the gambling addict from gambling.

The props in and superficial appearance of each person’s comfort zone vary, but, for all, it’s addictive, spiritually enslaving, and spiritually imprisoning.

Luckily, even if they choose not to heed the words above, those who have not been blessed by discomfort yet will be soon. Arguably, the best and only cure for addiction is to hit rock bottom, and, luckily, those who have not hit rock bottom will soon enough.

Life has a beautiful way of knocking over all pedestals in short time, but be it short or long, eventually, time destroys all clothes, both figurative and literal, and thus the beautiful nakedness beneath is always revealed.

Is that more clear?



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Abdm28
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Abdm28 »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: July 1st, 2024, 2:44 pm
Abdm28 wrote: June 29th, 2024, 10:42 am I feel like I'm the one talked about. This particular line in the book is like: "The comfort zone is a sticky dark trap, a spiritual prison for those who aren't careful." You aren't carful in what manner. I just need some clarification here. (Page 54).
Hi, Abdm28,

Thank you for your question.

If I re-word that section to the following, will this be more clear:
In It Together (3rd Edition, Draft) wrote: The job will one day end. The car will one day be sold for parts. The most attractive fashion model in the world will age, wrinkle, and scar. Even the happiest marriage in the world will end soon enough, by death or divorce.

It's those human beings with the prettiest faces and the most expensive cars, the most esteemed jobs, and the most glamorous wardrobes, who will tend to find the above words hardest to hear. The comfort zone is a sticky dark trap, a spiritual prison for those who aren't careful.

“Careful in what way?”, one might ask. The answer: Careful in the same way one could be careful with any addictive activity, behavior, or substance. Careful in the way one with a familial history of alcoholism might be careful with alcohol or bars. Careful in the way one with a history of gambling addiction might be careful at a casino. Careful in the way a human with a history of cowardice might be careful with fear and scary activities and the comfort of safety. All humans are on the addiction spectrum, some more than others. The specific props in each human’s struggle with addiction (a.k.a. spiritual slavery) vary, but perhaps the most fundamental addiction is comfort addiction, meaning the addiction to comfort. The coward (i.e. slave to fear) gets it from caving to fear and avoiding the discomfort of feeling fear. The alcoholic gets it from alcohol, the sex addict from sex, the overeating food addict from food, and the gambling addict from gambling.

The props in and superficial appearance of each person’s comfort zone vary, but, for all, it’s addictive, spiritually enslaving, and spiritually imprisoning.

Luckily, even if they choose not to heed the words above, those who have not been blessed by discomfort yet will be soon. Arguably, the best and only cure for addition is to hit rock bottom, and, luckily, those who have not hit rock bottom will soon enough.

Life has a beautiful way of knocking over all pedestals in short time, but be it short or long, eventually, time destroys all clothes, both figurative and literal, and thus the beautiful nakedness beneath is always revealed.

Is that more clear?



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
Thank you so much. That's clear enough.
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by Tony Jeton Selimi
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The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021