Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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MehulPan
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by MehulPan »

I'm currently on just 3rd page of the book so It is hard for me to comment on this, yet.
Youngreader720
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Youngreader720 »

I will say that I felt I understood the entirety of the book at first reading. However, some aspects became even clearer after the third time i read the book.
Rendell Vosson
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Rendell Vosson »

I understood every aspect of this great book. It was fun to read an the author took time to write this masterpiece. Congratulations on a job well done.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Oleabhiele Joseph wrote: November 13th, 2023, 1:35 am When I read it, sincerely speaking, every word, tone, and emotion was clear to me, at that time. But as I grow, and see other things in life’s I find myself wondering how the book interpreted it, making me want to go back and clarify some things.
Please do! :D

And on your next reading, if you come across a single sentence that you don't understand or with which you disagree, please do stop reading and come quote that sentence for me so we can discuss it together.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Rob Carr wrote: November 13th, 2023, 12:08 am There is a phrase you use a few times through the book "godliest parts."

I wasn't sure exactly what this was meant to refer to exactly. It is obviously part of a persons spiritual self/their real self but is it referring to the part of them which is most "good", their moral core, their most spiritual side?
A common similar way of saying the same thing as "in your heart of hearts and godliest parts" would just be to say "deep down inside of themselves".

In that section, when I say that addicts know the real truth "in their heart of hearts and godliest parts", despite the self-deceiving verbal lies in their mind's inner monologue, one could just as well re-phrase that to say that addicts know the real truth "deep down inside of themselves", despite despite the self-deceiving verbal lies in their mind's inner monologue.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Moisés Alcántara Ayre wrote: November 4th, 2023, 10:34 am Hi Scott,
The first sentence I did not understand is the following:

Pg 7--"I believe there is a force of unbelievable love and goodness deep within you, and that force is you more than anything is you."

I you wouldn't mind explaining it to me. The first clause is clear but the second one is not.

Moises Alcantara
May I ask if you read the whole book?

Namely, I think the section about The Two Yous and what you really are after you strip away any and all of your figurative clothes will clarify that.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Sanju Lali wrote: October 23rd, 2023, 1:19 pm Human brain senses fellow human's pain and empathy is felt. Same is with respect to mouth watering to delicious food shows all of us are bound, but what makes some humans to behave like inhuman?
Sanju Lali, can you explain what you mean by "inhuman" exactly? Can you give some examples? Is it possible that what you are describing as "inhuman" behavior is actually quite common human behavior?

For example, metaphorically speaking, many humans like to act like their sh*t doesn't stink, and may even (delusionally) act and speak as though a normal good humany human would have non-stinky sh*t. Thus, they may refer to a human with stinky sh*t as inhuman or as having an un-humanlike scent to their sh*t, in that it stinks when according to their delusions a more humanly smell would be non-stinky.

In other words, many times what people label as "human-like" is actually quite unrealistic and uncommon, often betraying absurdly high expectations, and thus likewise what they label as "inhuman" is quite human-like.

For example, most humans are very dishonest and selfish. Most humans are also addicts who do not have exceptional self-discipline (a.k.a. spiritual freedom), and they are basically cowards who are spiritual slaves to things like fear, hunger, and addictive urges such as the urge of an alcoholic drink or gambling addict to gamble. So being honest is inhuman and being dishonest is human-like. Being brave is inhuman and being a spiritual slave to fear (a.k.a. a coward to some degree or another) is human-like. Having exceptional self-discipline (a.k.a. spiritual freedom) is inhuman (and by defintion exceptional) and behaving like an addict is human-like and ordinary.

Personally, I work very hard to do my best to be as unhuman-like as humanly possible. But I do that with a loving acceptance of the borderline paradox of such an endeavor, meaning a deep loving happy respect for that extreme three-word qualifier at the end: "as humanly possible". In this human form, there is understandably only so little much wonderful inhumanity I can achieve.

To expect a human (even the one in the mirror) to be honest, unselfish, or brave is like expecting a bird to not grow feathers or a lion to not eat meat. Many humans foolishly expect all other humans to be very inhuman and then when those other humans don't live up to that absurd paradoxical standard, they judge, hate, resent, and scapegoat them. They might say, "how dare you humans be human-like instead of exceptionally inhuman-like! I am unhappy because you don't live up to my absurd expectations about how unchangeable reality should be different than it unchangeably is!"

For my part, I might light a candle or spray some air freshener after going to the bathroom, but that's about as far towards the goal of inhumanity one might reasonably aim to go. I do my best to be as inhuman as humanly possible, but even that is a very small amount of inhumanity.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott

civilized.jpg


In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program, both for the free option and the paid option.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Angie Fernandez wrote: October 10th, 2023, 9:27 am I am having a problem understanding that "to see evil is to hate reality itself, but that hate never truly comes from the spirit, not from the truth." Are you saying that you do not believe in evil? Then how do you explain sex trafficking, domestic abuse, child abuse, murder, etc. Are these not evil? Should we not hate these realities, and do everything in our power to eradicate them? I really appreciated your book, but there are some things that are right and wrong (ought and should not, if you will). Thank you for clarifying.
Hi, Angie Fernandez,

I'm a bit confused by your question because the quote you provided is on page 131, but (three pages before that) on page 128, I flat out write "there is no evil".

Are you sure you read the book in order without skipping or skimming, and that that sentence from page 131 is the very first sentence you didn't understand?




With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

PanwarP wrote: September 23rd, 2023, 6:11 am Page 136 had a line that, I believe, confused me a little more: "the wave is your form, not your essence." Your forms could be numerous, varied, and minuscule. Your essence is unique and incredibly magnificent."
Based on your question, I am going to add the following paragraph to the book right after that part you quoted:

"In other words, in terms of the Two Yous, your figurative clothes and countless different outfits may be many, diverse, and each thin and short-lived. But the real naked you that wears all those different outfits is singular and eternal and has a depth that is as infinite as the varying clothes are the thin."

Does that clarify it?
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Nisha DSouza wrote: September 7th, 2023, 2:35 pm Hi Scott,

I will be honest and say that the initial pages were too philosophical for me and sometimes confused me. That is probably because I haven't read many books such as yours. However, after I re-read the sentences, I understood what you meant. As I read more I quite enjoyed your thought process and was totally impressed by the book's end.

The part that really touched me was on page 111, "... feel free to literally walk over to the mirror right now and tell that human, ... "I accept you. I unconditionally accept each and every part of you. In fact, I love you. I unconditionally love each and every part of you, in part and in whole.""

That was so beautiful, I had tears in my eyes when I said it to myself. Thank you. I am looking forward to implementing your suggestions for inner peace.
Hi, Nisha DSouza,

Thank you so much for your kind words and feedback!

I hope you don't mind, but I was so moved by this, I shared it on my Facebook and Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/p/C1nG1b1vXiM/

https://www.facebook.com/ScottMichaelHu ... pJ3MMKnrkl


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

I believe I answered all the questions and clarified any statements quoted in this topic. However, if I missed anyone's post, please do re-post to let me know. :)
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Jessica Azuka
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Jessica Azuka »

Not to lie, the book contains some ambiguous sentences and words when I read it at first. But I went back and with my dictionary now and I got to understand the book better. It might seem boring at first, but once understood, it's amazing.
Sakshi Singh1
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Sakshi Singh1 »

Hello. I'm only around 10–15 pages into this book. I understood everything until now. I now know that if there is anything I don't understand, I can refer to this thread. Thank you very much.
Akinyi Jane
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Akinyi Jane »

I found the book to be simple and direct. I understood 90 percent of it.
Omondi Peter
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Re: Did you understand every sentence in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what part did you first not understand?

Post by Omondi Peter »

I enjoyed "In It Together" by Scott! Discovering a new author can be quite rewarding.
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