What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

To post in this forum, you must buy and read the book. After buying the book, please email a copy of your receipt to [email protected] to be given access to this forum.
Forum rules
This forum is for discussing the book In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All. Anyone can view the forum and read the post, but only people who purchased the book can post in the forum.

If your purchased has not already been verified, please email a copy of your receipt to [email protected] to be given access to this forum.
Post Reply
Faes
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: August 31st, 2023, 11:56 pm

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Faes »

Evil is evil. To me evil is bad. Evil is what goes against societal concept of good. It is that which does harm to things or people be it psychological, emotional, physical, or otherwise.
Thera reads
Premium Member
Posts: 13
Joined: October 10th, 2023, 6:38 pm

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Thera reads »

I don't believe that evil do exist because what one may tag as evil may be the norm for other.
Terrine Wild
Premium Member
Posts: 6
Joined: October 11th, 2023, 12:29 pm

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Terrine Wild »

I believe that evil is doing to someone what you won't want someone to do to you. It really is that simple. We should all treat ourselves with respect.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5701
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Hi, Amanda Brouillette Gladden,

Thank you for your questions! :)
Amanda Brouillette Gladden wrote: September 8th, 2023, 9:12 am how do you think organisms - the rabid dog - or enemies - the hurricane - come into existence with intent? For example, do you think the dog is a black tablet that r teach or it learns through its surroundings like a wolf?
I'm sorry; I don't understand this question. Can you re-word it?

Amanda Brouillette Gladden wrote: September 8th, 2023, 9:12 am Do you think the storm is created as way for earth to destroy and rebuild?
No, I don't think so, but I'm not sure I enen understand what you are asking, as in I don't really understand what it would mean for one to say, "Hurricanes are created by Earth as a way to destroy and rebuild?"

It sounds like it might be a case of the pathetic fallacy.


Amanda Brouillette Gladden wrote: September 8th, 2023, 9:12 am With those thoughts, what is your take on the way humans come into existence? Are they tabula rasa ~ John Locke. Are they born self-serving just taught to be good through laws and prior morales ~ Hobbes? Or, are we born good and corrupted by societal influence ~ Rousseau?
None of the above. For the reasons explained in my book, I don't believe in 'morality' (i.e. 'shoulds' and 'oughts'). As I say in the book, I believe nothing happens that shouldn't happen.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5701
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: February 21st, 2023, 9:52 pm
I typically think of the word "evil" as simply meaning "something that ought not be" or in yet other synonymous words as meaning, "something that should not have happened".

Imagine one person says, "The hurricane that happened yesterday is evil". And a second person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday should not have happened." And a third person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday ought not have happened." And a forth person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday was morally wrong."

I would interpret all four people in the above situation as all saying the exact same thing, just with different words.

Likewise, I would interpret it as all four people either (1) saying something exists that I do not believe exists and/or (2) saying something that doesn't even make sense.

What is that singular thing (or pseudo-thing) to which each of those four people would be all referring? It is the pseudo-idea that unchangeable reality 'should' be different than it unchangeably is, or even could be. Perhaps the clearest label for what they are all describing is to call it 'should-not-ness'. By that definition, something is "evil" if it happened but 'should' not have happened or if it 'should' be different than it unchangeably is.

[...]

For example, I believe even a rabid dog deserves unconditional love, forgiveness, and sympathy. As I use the terms, for one to say a rabid dog is "evil" is to say the opposite; It is to say one doesn't love the dog, or doesn't forgive the dog, or that one hates the dog or resents the dog, or that one otherwise doesn't accept that it is the way it is, any of which is inconsistent with my philosophy and beliefs. I don't think anything real is worth resenting or hating.

[...]


If you use the word "evil" to refer to something else than I've described above, then indeed whatever you call "evil" might be something that I do believe exists. If you use the word "evil" differently than I do, then all bets are off. For example, you could have a dog named Evil, and then I would of course believe your dog Evil exists. I'd probably give Evil a little pet. :)


What do you think? Do you agree that what I call "evil" (i.e. 'should-not-ness') does not actually exist?
Hyfr Zack wrote: September 12th, 2023, 7:40 am In my opinion, [should-not-have-ness] does exist and is manifested in a variety of modern vices.
Hi, Hyfr Zack,

Thank you for your reply! :)

If you believe that should-not-have-ness exists, can you give me some examples of things that happened that you believe 'should not have' happened?


With love,
Eckhart
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5701
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: February 21st, 2023, 9:52 pm
I typically think of the word "evil" as simply meaning "something that ought not be" or in yet other synonymous words as meaning, "something that should not have happened".

Imagine one person says, "The hurricane that happened yesterday is evil". And a second person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday should not have happened." And a third person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday ought not have happened." And a forth person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday was morally wrong."

I would interpret all four people in the above situation as all saying the exact same thing, just with different words.

Likewise, I would interpret it as all four people either (1) saying something exists that I do not believe exists and/or (2) saying something that doesn't even make sense.

What is that singular thing (or pseudo-thing) to which each of those four people would be all referring? It is the pseudo-idea that unchangeable reality 'should' be different than it unchangeably is, or even could be. Perhaps the clearest label for what they are all describing is to call it 'should-not-ness'. By that definition, something is "evil" if it happened but 'should' not have happened or if it 'should' be different than it unchangeably is.

[...]

For example, I believe even a rabid dog deserves unconditional love, forgiveness, and sympathy. As I use the terms, for one to say a rabid dog is "evil" is to say the opposite; It is to say one doesn't love the dog, or doesn't forgive the dog, or that one hates the dog or resents the dog, or that one otherwise doesn't accept that it is the way it is, any of which is inconsistent with my philosophy and beliefs. I don't think anything real is worth resenting or hating.

[...]


If you use the word "evil" to refer to something else than I've described above, then indeed whatever you call "evil" might be something that I do believe exists. If you use the word "evil" differently than I do, then all bets are off. For example, you could have a dog named Evil, and then I would of course believe your dog Evil exists. I'd probably give Evil a little pet. :)


What do you think? Do you agree that what I call "evil" (i.e. 'should-not-ness') does not actually exist?
Catherine Radford wrote: September 17th, 2023, 5:45 pm An interesting take, sadly I do believe there are [people who shouldn't be the way they are] out there and also people who do [things they shouldn't do].
Hi, Catherine Radford,

Thank you for your reply! :)

If you believe should-not-have-ness exists, then can you give me some examples?

Can you give me example of something that happened that "shouldn't" have happened?

Can you give me an example of a person or thing that "shouldn't" be the way it is?

Secondarily, may I ask, are these things that are within your control (i.e. a matter of your choice)?

Thirdly, my I ask, do you (like me) practice the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting that which you cannot control and cannot change?


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.
a.k.a.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5701
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: February 21st, 2023, 9:52 pm
I typically think of the word "evil" as simply meaning "something that ought not be" or in yet other synonymous words as meaning, "something that should not have happened".

Imagine one person says, "The hurricane that happened yesterday is evil". And a second person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday should not have happened." And a third person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday ought not have happened." And a forth person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday was morally wrong."

I would interpret all four people in the above situation as all saying the exact same thing, just with different words.

Likewise, I would interpret it as all four people either (1) saying something exists that I do not believe exists and/or (2) saying something that doesn't even make sense.

What is that singular thing (or pseudo-thing) to which each of those four people would be all referring? It is the pseudo-idea that unchangeable reality 'should' be different than it unchangeably is, or even could be. Perhaps the clearest label for what they are all describing is to call it 'should-not-ness'. By that definition, something is "evil" if it happened but 'should' not have happened or if it 'should' be different than it unchangeably is.

[...]

For example, I believe even a rabid dog deserves unconditional love, forgiveness, and sympathy. As I use the terms, for one to say a rabid dog is "evil" is to say the opposite; It is to say one doesn't love the dog, or doesn't forgive the dog, or that one hates the dog or resents the dog, or that one otherwise doesn't accept that it is the way it is, any of which is inconsistent with my philosophy and beliefs. I don't think anything real is worth resenting or hating.

[...]


If you use the word "evil" to refer to something else than I've described above, then indeed whatever you call "evil" might be something that I do believe exists. If you use the word "evil" differently than I do, then all bets are off. For example, you could have a dog named Evil, and then I would of course believe your dog Evil exists. I'd probably give Evil a little pet. :)


What do you think? Do you agree that what I call "evil" (i.e. 'should-not-ness') does not actually exist?
NENYE1999 wrote: October 8th, 2023, 7:50 pm You emphasize that even challenging situations should be approached with love and understanding, rather than resentment or hatred. Your perspective on "evil" is rooted in the belief that accepting the unchangeable is key to living in accordance with your philosophy. I agree to this. As for my perception on [should-not-have-ness]. I think it is what goes against my moral beliefs.
Hi, NENYE1999,

Thank you for your reply! :)

Can you give me an example of something that someone or something did that you believe was immoral (i.e. 'shouldn't have happened')?

Can you give me an example of a person or thing that is immoral (i.e. "shouldn't be the way it is")[/i]?

Secondarily, may I ask, are these things that are within your control (i.e. a matter of your choice)?

Thirdly, my I ask, do you (like me) practice the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting that which you cannot control and cannot change?

Fourthly, may I ask, in your view as you define the terms, what if anything is the difference between (1) having moral beliefs (i.e. beliving things that happen are immoral) versus (2) resentfully engaging in judgementalism?

That's not a rhetorical question. I'm genuinely asking so I can understand you better. :)


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5701
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: February 21st, 2023, 9:52 pm
I typically think of the word "evil" as simply meaning "something that ought not be" or in yet other synonymous words as meaning, "something that should not have happened".

Imagine one person says, "The hurricane that happened yesterday is evil". And a second person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday should not have happened." And a third person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday ought not have happened." And a forth person says, "That hurricane that happened yesterday was morally wrong."

I would interpret all four people in the above situation as all saying the exact same thing, just with different words.

Likewise, I would interpret it as all four people either (1) saying something exists that I do not believe exists and/or (2) saying something that doesn't even make sense.

What is that singular thing (or pseudo-thing) to which each of those four people would be all referring? It is the pseudo-idea that unchangeable reality 'should' be different than it unchangeably is, or even could be. Perhaps the clearest label for what they are all describing is to call it 'should-not-ness'. By that definition, something is "evil" if it happened but 'should' not have happened or if it 'should' be different than it unchangeably is.

[...]

For example, I believe even a rabid dog deserves unconditional love, forgiveness, and sympathy. As I use the terms, for one to say a rabid dog is "evil" is to say the opposite; It is to say one doesn't love the dog, or doesn't forgive the dog, or that one hates the dog or resents the dog, or that one otherwise doesn't accept that it is the way it is, any of which is inconsistent with my philosophy and beliefs. I don't think anything real is worth resenting or hating.

[...]


If you use the word "evil" to refer to something else than I've described above, then indeed whatever you call "evil" might be something that I do believe exists. If you use the word "evil" differently than I do, then all bets are off. For example, you could have a dog named Evil, and then I would of course believe your dog Evil exists. I'd probably give Evil a little pet. :)


What do you think? Do you agree that what I call "evil" (i.e. 'should-not-ness') does not actually exist?
Faes wrote: October 10th, 2023, 4:53 am To me [should-not-have-ness] is bad. [Should-not-have-ness] is what goes against societal concept of good. It is that which does harm to things or people be it psychological, emotional, physical, or otherwise.
Hi, Faes,

Thank you for your reply! :)

If you believe should-not-have-ness exists, then can you give me some specific examples? I know you mentioned things that "do harm to things or people" or that go "against societal concept of good". But can you give some specific examples of those? I'm doing my best to think of some for you but it seems absurd, so perhaps I am misunderstanding. Lions do harm to antelope, when they kill and eat the antelope. So according to what you've said, lions shouldn't be the way they are and do things they shouldn't do (i.e. are evil). Is that right? Do you think lions are evil?

In Nazi Germany, it was a crime to hide Anne Frank in your attic. To do it was to go against the ever-changing societal concepts of good. Are you thus saying that the woman that helped hide Anne Frank was doing something she shouldn't have done (i.e. was evil)?

It seems like appealing to a "societal concept" might just be a form of the ad populum fallacy. What do you?

That's not a rhetorical question. I'm genuinely curious in your answer. I love learning about different perspectives! :)


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



Image generated by AI. The prompt: "An antelope running away from a sharp-toothed lion in outer space."
Image generated by AI. The prompt: "An antelope running away from a sharp-toothed lion in outer space."
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5701
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Terrine Wild wrote: October 12th, 2023, 2:33 pm I believe that [should-not-have-ness] is doing to someone what you won't want someone to do to you. It really is that simple. We should all treat ourselves with respect.
Hi, Terrine Wild,

Thank you for your reply! :)

Needless to say, if you believe that "we should all treat ourselves [and others] with respect", then you definitely cannot agree with everything in my book, especially since at the end I every explicitly explain how I absolutely do not believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts'. But the book is written in logically linear way, where later conclusions are based on logical inferences from earlier premise, meaning if you disagree with any earlier statement, it's anticipated (and essentially guaranteed) that you will then as a result also disagree with later statements. For that reason, I am very intrigued and eager to read your reply in the following topic, so please do reply there if you haven't already:

Do you agree with everything in the book, "In It Together"? If not, what is the first sentence with which you disagree?


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Leonie Vermaak
Premium Member
Posts: 15
Joined: November 3rd, 2022, 10:16 am

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Leonie Vermaak »

No I don't believe lions are evil. They just make part of the circle of life. They hunt to eat and to survive and create balance. I would say that you get more humans that's evil, then any other creature on earth. If you just look at the sencelss killing, rapes, abuse and wars, to name a few, that is what I would classify as evil. Yes it shouldn't have happened but it did, and not to create balance in any form, or a method of survival, it was just a senseless act or a egotistical impulse that created the situation. That is evil to me.
Bettny Andrade
Premium Member
Posts: 14
Joined: October 13th, 2023, 10:57 pm

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Bettny Andrade »

I've been thinking about that lately. Many things are not necessarily bad things, they are circumstances, things that happen that for some people are very lucky events, for others they are a normal day, and for others something that should not have happened. Maybe it depends on each person's circumstances or their level of thinking and how they see things.
Stephen Christopher 1
Premium Member
Posts: 9
Joined: May 22nd, 2023, 8:57 am

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Stephen Christopher 1 »

Hi Scott
I understand your meaning here, and for the most part, I agree. If it's something that's unchangeable, like a hurricane or a rabid dog, then using 'evil' to describe them is incorrect. In the dog's case, rabies is an illness; it may cause the dog to do things that could be called 'evil', but it's not intentionally doing them; it's doing them because rabies is a mood alterer.
Where I use 'evil' is to describe intentional, malicious acts by others. A serial killer who shows no remorse and even laughs during their court proceeding can only be described as an evil person, right?
I understand unconditional love, but would you truly love somebody who demonstrates that level of awful behaviour?
I'm keen to know what you think, thanks
Stephen
Marina Flisvou
Premium Member
Posts: 11
Joined: October 13th, 2023, 7:12 pm

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Marina Flisvou »

Your viewpoint on "evil" as things that "shouldn't have happened" is intriguing. I agree that when we label situations or things as "evil," we might be resisting reality instead of accepting it. Emphasizing love and understanding over quick judgments is a healthier approach. This discomfort might stem from deeply ingrained societal values or personal beliefs. Emphasizing love and understanding, challenges us to confront and potentially reframe these innate reactions. It urges us to be more reflective, less reactive, and to prioritize compassion over condemnation.
Kutloano Makhuvhela
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: October 21st, 2023, 11:31 am

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Kutloano Makhuvhela »

I was quick to disagree with you there, because I think evil exist, just as much as its opposite, which is love and kindness, do exist. But after hearing your lengthy explanation, I kind of get what you're hinting at, and by following your logic, I too can conclude that evil does not exist. But outside of that logic, I can say it exists. There are people who are hell-bent on causing others harm and distress, and those people can only be described as evil, and rightly so.
Oscar Zereta
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: October 27th, 2023, 10:08 am

Re: What the word "evil" means to me, and why I believe evil (as I use the term) does not exist.

Post by Oscar Zereta »

Evil can be seen in different point of views. There are evil that naturally occur, and no one is to be blamed about it. In other aspects, there are evil that are been done by people towards people they want hurt. Using war as an example, Negative thoughts and evil go together. People are driven by negative thoughts as they don't have that humanity in the them anymore.
Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes”

2023/2024 Philosophy Books of the Month

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise
by John K Danenbarger
January 2023

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul
by Mitzi Perdue
February 2023

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness
by Chet Shupe
March 2023

The Unfakeable Code®

The Unfakeable Code®
by Tony Jeton Selimi
April 2023

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021