Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here.

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

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Hi, Alex Lynn,

Thank you for your questions! :D
Alex Lynn wrote: December 14th, 2023, 11:52 am Have you ever once had times when you had a lot of goals to pursue, I mean before you started online book club, or presently [...]
Have I ever had a lot of goals to pursue? The short answer is yes, but that's a misleading understatement. I have always had a lot of goals to pursue, and I still do, and I will until I die. To be alive as a human is to have many unfilled goals (a.k.a. unfulfilled desires). If having unfulfilled goals and/or unfulfilled desires is how we define 'suffering' (i.e. that suffering is to have a desire/goal that is unfulfilled), then to be alive is to suffer.

That concept is discussed deeply in my book, as well as how we can achieve unwavering invincible free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) despite being on a hedonic treadmill of endless desires and goals.

May I ask have you read my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All?

If so, how many times?

I recommend everyone read it at least twice. The reason for reading it at least twice (as opposed to just once) is explained here.

Here is something I wrote on Page 4 of the book: "If the word “suffering” simply means having unfulfilled desire, then to be human is to suffer. That is because when one fulfills their current desires, more desires emerge. When one reaches their current
goals, their mind creates new ones. [...] You cannot eliminate desire by fulfilling desire. Fulfillment causes desire and goals to be replaced, not eliminated. You cannot achieve a state of goallessness by achieving goals."


Alex Lynn wrote: December 14th, 2023, 11:52 am How do you cope with focus at that moment and still achieve your success, or do you decide to leave some aspirations for some other ones?
I tend to compartmentalize.

I do daily goal-setting in which I repetitively write down the same 5-10 goals over and over every single day in journal first thing in the morning. I usually have about 10 written goals at any one time that I do this with. I typically have 2-3 related to fitness, and 2-3 related to business/money/finances, and then a few others about various other things.

During the rest of the day, I don't worry about all 10 goals at once.

I might workout in the gym for only an hour, or less, but during that hour I am focused on my fitness goals.

Then I might spend 8 self-scheduled hours working on my business. Then I am focused on those goals.

Then I might work on something else unrelated to business, money, or physical fitness. During that time I focus on that goal.

Even with 8 full hours of sleep, you have 16 waking hour per day. That means you can give your full undivided attention to 16 different tasks/goals/etc. for one hour each every single day.

When you put a full undivided focused hour towards something every day, you would be amazed what you can do on that one thing/goal. You (and those around you) will be shocked at the progress you make on that thing by consistently putting in a full focused hour on it every single day.

But you can do that with 16 different things at that one hour per day rate.

Granted, a more reasonable figure might be 10 per day, leaving yourself a spare 6 waking hours for breaks and lollygagging.

So you could set 10 simultaneous goals about 10 very different things, and put 1 hour per day towards each of the 10, giving that one your full undivided attention and focus for that one hour per day.

But the most important thing is much deeper than that, and is discussed and taught best by my book. It's that you want to be sure that you are already happy, meaning truly happy in terms of having invincible inner peace now while working on these goals. If you truly enjoy being on the hedonic treadmill, you will run farther and longer (i.e. succeed and achieve much more). But if you treat it like it has some end, you'll just be eternally miserable, which unsurprising leads to much less success. You ultimately do much worse on the treadmill in performance measures if you are miserable while doing it. My book teaches that idea in detail, and it can be summed up in these mantras:


- Love the endless work.

- Love the endless journey.

- Love having unfilled desires.

- Love having unfulfilled goals.

- Love challenge.


For more on that, you can also read my topic:

Life is challenge. Every single day life punches you in the face, repeatedly. That's what is so great about it!





With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



Quote from "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Quote from "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Amy Jackson »

Hi, Scott. Thank you for your time and efforts.
My question is in response to what you said about decision paralysis:

Please can you emphasize more on the difference between strategies and decisions? I get that strategies have to do with the how, while decisions have to do with the what. How can one focus more on the strategies than on the decisions?

When it comes to big decisions like one of your examples - to get a divorce or continue spending time and money on counseling, I think the decision paralysis would be caused by not knowing how well or badly that decision could affect one's life. And the fact that bad decisions have been made already and one is trying to be more careful.

With this example I've used now, I'm seeing now that the strategy could be how to maintain inner peace, and then taking the decision that will help to attain that. Please am I getting it?
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Celestine Apiche »

I have a question can one multitask occupation. For instance, can one be a doctor, engineer and an artist at the same time?
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Conshelle Dwright Williams wrote: December 17th, 2023, 5:29 am Hey there, scott! Just wanted to share how much your book has influenced me. I've realized that the opinions of others don't define me. I've learned to appreciate myself, recognizing my own grace and hard work. It's even motivated me to hit the gym, which I've surprisingly found enjoyable. The benefits I've gained from this journey are immense. Your work has truly made a difference in my life. All I need help with now is better academic advice because even your book didn’t help that much. I think I need a different approach to that. Kudos to you!
Hi, Conshelle Dwright Williams, I am so happy you have found my book to be helpful! :D

Can you elaborate a bit on what you mean specifically when you say you need help with better academic advice? Do you have any specific questions for me?


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.
Briton Opiyo wrote: December 20th, 2023, 2:22 am Hello Scott, I have a question. What do you do when you keep failing over and over again?
Hi, Briton Opiyo,

Thank you for your question! :D

May I ask if you have already read my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All?

If not, my number one recommendation to you is to read it, twice.

The reason I ask is because your question as worded seems to possibly contradict several of my central teachings, including but not limited to the following:

- "When it comes to your choices, you always get exactly what you want, meaning what you choose."

- Success is a choice, and failure is an illusion.

- Let go of the illusion that it could have been any different.

- There is no 'should', no 'ought', and no 'try'. You are 100% in control of your choices.


In other words, I never fail because I never try. And I never try because I realize there is no try. From that realization, there comes incredible grace, extreme self-responsibility, and invincible free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. invincible unwavering true happiness).

The illusion of trying and failure is generally a symptom of one or both of the following:

1. Not fully and unconditionally accepting what you cannot control and cannot change. This would be trying to do X when X is something you know you cannot do.

2. Not being fully honest with yourself about what your choices and desires are (e.g. "I am not choosing to gain weight; I am trying to lose weight and failing." or "I am not a cheating spouse who is choosing to have an affair! I am someone who is trying my best to not cheat and failing".)

If you meditate on this in regard to the alleged failures you are experiencing, you can surely figure out which of those two things is more the case for you. However, if you give me specific examples of the ways you have allegedly "failed" and what you were "trying" to do when you failed, I can help you implement the teachings of my book to thereby eliminate the illusions of failure and trying from both what you see and your vocabulary, both in how you speak to others and more importantly how you speak to yourself inside your own head. In other words, I can help reveal to you that you aren't actually failing, but that can be a very bitter pill to swallow for many.


You could also re-word your question to something like this: "What do you do when life is especially challenging?"

To that, my answer is best given by the following topic:

Life is challenge. Every single day life punches you in the face, repeatedly. That's what is so great about it!

It's also very related to the question already previously asked by someone else, "How do you handle it when life gets in your way?". So I suggest you read my answer to that question here.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



Do or do not. There is no try. Failure is an illusion.
Do or do not. There is no try. Failure is an illusion.


---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Bron Bakers wrote: December 20th, 2023, 11:26 am Please I'd like to know why manual verification on the other website wastes so much time. What can I do to reduce the time wasting.
Bron Bakers , I'm sorry; I'm not sure what you mean. Most likely, you will want to contact the support team at "the other website" whatever it is, and provide them with many more details about what the issue/question is exactly. Typically, you can find a contact link in the footer of most website's, if not in the main navigation menu.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Leonie Vermaak wrote: December 21st, 2023, 3:57 pm Hi Scott.

This question might have come up earlier, so please direct me if the answer is already given.

So here's my question.

I really want to write a memior of my life. Bits and pieces of growing up but mainly about what I went through from the age of 19 to 32. My goal with this is to help people that's in the same situation that I was, to get out and get help.
Hi, Leonie Vermaak,

Thank you so much for your question! :D

The above is wonderful goal, and I would love to help you on your journey to do your best to accomplish it.

However, in the remaining three sentences (quoted below), I can see where your thought process is going off-track by contradicting the teachings in my book and thereby creating a roadblock for you. But the good news is that since you are creating this roadblock for yourself, you can easily eliminate this conjured imaginary roadblock to move past it.

Leonie Vermaak wrote: December 21st, 2023, 3:57 pmMy problem though is I don't know how to get started. Where to begin, and in what way must I write this, 3rd person or first-person. What should I avoid to not make it a tedious read.


May I ask how many times you have read my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All?

I recommend you read it at least twice all the way through. The reason for reading it at least twice (as opposed to just once) is explained here.

So my first recommendation to you is to read the book all the way through at least twice, if not more.

My second recommendation is to stop using any of the six misery-inducing words. If it helps, you can even re-program the auto-correct on your phone and computer to replace words like 'should' or 'ought' anytime you use them, so that you can catch yourself and re-phrase.

As phrased, I can really only answer your question by reminding you that, as my book teaches, there is nothing you need to do. There is nothing you must do. There is nothing you should do. Likewise, there is no try, and thus even failure itself is an illusion. While you can talk of external problems/challenges such as in the sense of a math problem you want to solve in a game you are playing that you want to win, I think it contradicts the teachings of my book to take ownership of such a problem with a phrase like my problem, especially because that becomes a slippery slope to worrying/resenting/hating/complaining about things out of one's control (e.g. " my problem is my spouse's behavior", "my problem is that the weather doesn't do what I want it to do", etc.). If it's not in your control, you can't "solve" it', and thus it isn't your problem; and if you fully practice the teachings of my book (namely fully and unconditionally accepting what you cannot control) then in most senses you won't even see it as a problem.

Solve the solvable, and see the would-be unsolvable as therefore unproblematic; then, there are no problems. Only worry about what you can control, and then you have no worries. Only focus on (i.e. see as mattering) that which you control, and then you control everything that matters. It will truly make you feel omnipotent, in a very meaningful and literal sense. And from that frictionless state, free-spirited creative art tends to flow. Once you get there, you might come back to me and ask how you can stop writing so much and creating so many great books. You may start to think that writing and creatively creating is becoming almost like an addiction or obsession to you because you will have removed so much friction from the process and it will flow so easily from you and you can so easily enter that flow state, both for writing and any other aspect of your life or of creative creating.

Assuming you have read the book in full at least twice, please do re-post your question but re-phrased to avoid any un-quoted uses of any of the six misery-inducing words.

Of course, you might be surprised how much quiet clarity you gain from letting go of those kind of words, and by following the similar teachings in my book, and then find that the answer becomes obvious to you.

Part of the wonder of spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) and free-spirited inner peace is the way the would-be friction and anxious decision-making evaporates and your inspired actions and art flow with infinite creative ease, once you let go of all the things of which my book teaches you to let go.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


Quote from the book, "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All"
Quote from the book, "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All"

---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.


Hi, Amy Jackson,

Thank you for your questions!

Amy Jackson wrote: December 25th, 2023, 4:56 pm Hi, Scott. Thank you for your time and efforts.
My question is in response to what you said about decision paralysis.

Please can you emphasize more on the difference between strategies and decisions? I get that strategies have to do with the how, while decisions have to do with the what.
You pretty much hit the nail on the head with your second sentence, so I think you got it.

To elaborate, I can also point out that strategizing tends to be a more open-ended creative brainstorming process in which via wild brainstorming you come up with many different means/paths to the desired end, and then switch back to decision-making mode to choose which of those means/paths to take to the end/destination.

A decision is more like choosing the destination while a strategizing is more about figuring out the path(s) to that destination and possibly researching, writing down, and/or quantifying the pros and cons of the different means/path to the end, e.g. bus vs, plane vs. roadtrip, or highway with tolls versus longer backroads route with no tolls.

Amy Jackson wrote: December 25th, 2023, 4:56 pm When it comes to big decisions like one of your examples - to get a divorce or continue spending time and money on counseling, I think the decision paralysis would be caused by not knowing how well or badly that decision could affect one's life.

[Emphasis added.]
Well, that can't be strictly true as written because the specifics of the general situation would vary from specific case to specific case. However, if you replace "would" with "could" we get the following:

"When it comes to big decisions like one of your examples - to get a divorce or continue spending time and money on counseling, I think the decision paralysis could be caused by not knowing how well or badly that decision could affect one's life."

I think I agree. Moreover, I suspect we can simplify and generalize that to something with which I would even more surely and loudly agree: Decision paralysis can be caused by worrying about what one cannot control and/or by trying to control things one cannot control, such as unpredictable aspects of one's relative future.

Due to it's unpredictability, and thus de facto randomness, and the way it converges to the same eventual end regardless (e.g. the explosion of the Sun and the heat death of the universe), the future is almost entirely the same as the past in the sense that it's generally something you cannot control. Trying to change whether it will rain tomorrow is no more wise than trying to change whether it rained yesterday.

The limits of what is and is not your choice, and the limits of what you can control and do not control is set in part by what you can know and predict about the future which is very limited. If you don't know the repressions of a choice you are making, then those repercussions are not part of the choice and are not something you control.

In terms of the Butterfly Effect, the sense in which the butterfly's flapping wings may cause a hurricane is firmly not a sense in which the butterfly is choosing to create a hurricane or that the creation of the hurricane is something in the butterfly's control. To really understand this, requires understanding the different between what my book calls "The Two Yous".

You are the proverbial butterfly, and what is caused by the butterfly's body is not (necessarily) caused by you--the real you--and is not (necessarily) something you--the real you--control.

When you are playing with face-down cards you've never seen, don't worry about how you play them in the way you would when you are playing with face-up cards that you have seen. In the former case, you may not really be playing at all, but instead the body you call yours at one time is being used as a purposely careless sort of random number generator in a game whose rules and outcome is neither your responsibility nor a matter of your choice.

This is why you also (rightly) don't usually say things like, "I beat my heart." What your body does or causes is not the same as what you do or cause or choose.

Conscious control (a.k.a. choice) requires knowledge, which when applied over timespans requires predictability. When it comes to matters of the future, you cannot choose what you cannot predict.

Amy Jackson wrote: December 25th, 2023, 4:56 pm And the fact that bad decisions have been made already and one is trying to be more careful.
That could be a factor in many divorce-considers.

More broadly speaking, we can see there is a lot of overlap between what I call decision paralysis and the act of "trying" itself.

In some cases, they may be one and the same, but regardless they are definitely both symptomatic of not accepting what one cannot control and/or not being honest with oneself.

Many people experiencing decision paralysis are probably treating a decision that doesn't matter as if it matters because it is conducive to a degree of denial about the seemingly unfortunate circumstances that make all available options so equally unpleasant.

Imagine someone who is married to a serial cheater (i.e. a spouse who has had multiple affairs, even after getting caught, apologizing, and promising to not do it again). Imagine the couple has already done couple's counseling for over a year. Now imagine this person is considering to keep working on the marriage and such or call it quits and file for divorce. If that person is experiencing decision paralysis, it is likely going hand-in-hand with (if not being identical to) them trying to do something they know is impossible and/or trying to change what they cannot change (e.g. change their cheating spouse into a faithful spouse or change the fact that having a marriage with a loyal spouse is simply not an option available to them at this time). You can see that often the decision paralysis can be a way to avoid being honest with oneself that the decision doesn't matter that much. Either option is going to be extremely uncomfortable. For one who has not found invincible inner peace and the power of acceptance, either option will likely entail miserable regret and wrist-wringing doubt even long-after it was made.

Amy Jackson wrote: December 25th, 2023, 4:56 pm With this example I've used now, I'm seeing now that the strategy could be how to maintain inner peace, and then taking the decision that will help to attain that. Please am I getting it?
Yes, I think you are getting it, but I might look at inner peace as a decision than a strategy, or really something that's presence or absense precedes both.

In any case, I want to also note inner peace isn't something that takes time to attain nor that depends on any external circumstance (e.g. being married vs divorced). So both the strategizing and decision-making tends to be something that happens independently of whether one has and maintains inner peace. Both those with inner peace and those without will make decisions (e.g. get divorced or not) and come up with strategies to implement that decision. People with inner peace will simply happen to have the true happiness that is free-spirited inner peace while they do it. There's three different things at play here: (1) The what (i.e. decisions), (2) the how (i.e. strategies), and (3) whether or not one happens to have inner peace before and while doing the other two. People who have the false belief of thinking that #3 depends on #2 and #1 (e.g. once I achieve of my goal of X, where X is something like getting married, getting divorced, having kids, making a million dollars, buying a house, etc., then I will finally be happy and have inner peace) will continue to not have inner peace and never be happy because there will always be more goals to achieve and greener grass to chase. Happy people (i.e. those with inner peace) still do #1 and #2, but they are happy while they do it because they realize that it's something that's done on top of and separately to being happy and having inner peace, not some kind of means to achieving inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) in some idolized future where all goals have been met and all desires fulfilled such that one lives in a boring desireless goalless state. The future-idolizers chase that imaginary desireless goalless state, waiting to be truly happy (i.e. have inner peace) until they reach that impossible unreachable state and thus are never happy, and a common symptom of that is being a control freak about the future in the sense of trying to control what they cannot control, let alone even predict.

Inner peace is a choice made in the present and depends only on your present choices in your unique present at any given moment. As long as you are following the teachings of my book in any given moment, you will have invincible inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) in that moment, and you can choose to follow those teachings at any moment.

In other words, it's important to note that inner peace is 100% in your control, which is especially noteworthy in a situation where you are dealing with other humans such as in an ending marriage, because that's a situation in which many choose unhappiness and inner dispeace by throwing around shoulds and oughts especially about their partner (e.g. "he should be doing this!", "If only she did that, I could be happy!") or otherwise refusing to accept what they cannot control and be 100% brutally honest with themself.

I think you are getting it, and so at least most of what I've written above will be preaching to the choir. But I hope it's helpful to you nonetheless!


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


one-cannot-have-inner-peace-if.png



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Post by Victory Ositaorah »

I feel opportuned to have read this piece.
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Leonie Vermaak »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: December 28th, 2023, 11:51 am If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at

Leonie Vermaak wrote: December 21st, 2023, 3:57 pm Hi Scott.

This question might have come up earlier, so please direct me if the answer is already given.

So here's my question.

I really want to write a memior of my life. Bits and pieces of growing up but mainly about what I went through from the age of 19 to 32. My goal with this is to help people that's in the same situation that I was, to get out and get help.


Hi, Leonie Vermaak,

Thank you so much for your question! :D

The above is wonderful goal, and I would love to help you on your journey to do your best to accomplish it.

However, in the remaining three sentences (quoted below), I can see where your thought process is going off-track by contradicting the teachings in my book and thereby creating a roadblock for you. But the good news is that since you are creating this roadblock for yourself, you can easily eliminate this conjured imaginary roadblock to move past it.


Leonie Vermaak wrote: December 21st, 2023, 3:57 pmMy problem though is I don't know how to get started. Where to begin, and in what way must I write this, 3rd person or first-person. What should I avoid to not make it a tedious read.


May I ask how many times you have read my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All[/url]?

I recommend you read it at least twice all the way through. The reason for reading it at least twice (as opposed to just once) is explained

So my first recommendation to you is to read the book all the way through at least twice, if not more.

My second recommendation is to stop using any of the /forums/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=18918]six misery-inducing words[/url]. If it helps, you can even re-program the auto-correct on your phone and computer to replace words like 'should' or 'ought' anytime you use them, so that you can catch yourself and re-phrase.

As phrased, I can really only answer your question by reminding you that, as my book teaches, there is nothing you need to do. There is nothing you must do. There is nothing you should do. Likewise, there is no try, and thus even failure itself is an illusion. While you can talk of external problems/challenges such as in the sense of a math problem you want to solve in a game you are playing that you want to win, I think it contradicts the teachings of my book to take ownership of such a problem with a phrase like my problem, especially because that becomes a slippery slope to worrying/resenting/hating/complaining about things out of one's control (e.g. " my problem is my spouse's behavior", "my problem is that the weather doesn't do what I want it to do", etc.). If it's not in your control, you can't "solve" it', and thus it isn't your problem; and if you fully practice the teachings of my book (namely fully and unconditionally accepting what you cannot control) then in most senses you won't even see it as a problem.

Solve the solvable, and see the would-be unsolvable as therefore unproblematic; then, there are no problems. Only worry about what you can control, and then you have no worries. Only focus on (i.e. see as mattering) that which you control, and then you control everything that matters. It will truly make you feel omnipotent, in a very meaningful and literal sense. And from that frictionless state, free-spirited creative art tends to flow. Once you get there, you might come back to me and ask how you can stop writing so much and creating so many great books. You may start to think that writing and creatively creating is becoming almost like an addiction or obsession to you because you will have removed so much friction from the process and it will flow so easily from you and you can so easily enter that flow state, both for writing and any other aspect of your life or of creative creating.

Assuming you have read the book in full at least twice, please do re-post your question but re-phrased to avoid any un-quoted uses of any of the

Of course, you might be surprised how much quiet clarity you gain from letting go of those kind of words, and by following the similar teachings in and then find that the answer becomes obvious to you.

Part of the wonder of spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) and free-spirited inner peace is the way the would-be friction and anxious decision-making evaporates and your inspired actions and art flow with infinite creative ease, once you let go of all the things of which teaches you to let go.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



an-imaginary-roadblock-can-be-as-effective-as-a-real-one.jpg


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In addition to having authored his book, In It Together[/url], Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.


Thanks so much for this Scott, I really appreciate it. After reading your answer I'm truly motivated again. I do have the tendency sometimes to worry about things that I can't control, like other people opinions etc. of things I create, for example what I write or what I paint. I have to stop doing that! I'm definitely reading your book again as it's clear there are some valuable lessons I forgot. I need to practice this everyday so that it becomes part of my being.
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Celestine Apiche wrote: December 26th, 2023, 2:46 am I have a question can one multitask occupation. For instance, can one be a doctor, engineer and an artist at the same time?
Hi, Celestine Apiche, yes, of course. Why wouldn't they be able to?

Back in 2014, I was working at two different restaurants at the same time (as a bartender/sever) while also running OnlineBookClub.org.

There's 168 hours in the week. Even if you sleep a full 8 hours each night (which I strongly recommend), that still leaves 112 hours.

You could work 30 hours per week at 3 different jobs (90 hours total) and that would still leave you plenty of time to spare, for some fun, rest, and chores.

With all that said, I wouldn't call that multitasking and I typically recommend against multitasking. Instead, I recommend compartmentalizing and monotasking. For instance, instead of multitasking on two tasks two hours, you can give one task your full undivided attention for one hour and then give the next task your full undivided attention for one hour. I find that to be much more productive, since by juggling too many balls at once you end up dropping all the balls and thus effectively juggling nothing. Secondly, it's also more conducive to a peaceful quiet well-functioning mind with less anxiety and stress. You end up inefficiently wasting energy, time, and mental resources when you are constantly attempting to overload your brain by thinking of a bunch of different things at once; it's both more miserable and less effective; it's lose-lose. In contrast, focused monotasking is win-win: You get more done and you are happier and more at peace while doing it.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


monotasking.jpg


---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: December 28th, 2023, 11:51 am May I ask how many times you have read my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All?

I recommend you read it at least twice all the way through. The reason for reading it at least twice (as opposed to just once) is explained

So my first recommendation to you is to read the book all the way through at least twice, if not more.

My second recommendation is to stop using any of the six misery-inducing words. If it helps, you can even re-program the auto-correct on your phone and computer to replace words like 'should' or 'ought' anytime you use them, so that you can catch yourself and re-phrase.

As phrased, I can really only answer your question by reminding you that, as my book teaches, there is nothing you need to do. There is nothing you must do. There is nothing you should do. Likewise, there is no try, and thus even failure itself is an illusion. W
Leonie Vermaak wrote: December 28th, 2023, 5:28 pm Thanks so much for this Scott, I really appreciate it. After reading your answer I'm truly motivated again. I do have the tendency sometimes to worry about things that I can't control, like other people opinions etc. of things I create, for example what I write or what I paint. I have to stop doing that! I'm definitely reading your book again as it's clear there are some valuable lessons I forgot. I need to practice this everyday so that it becomes part of my being.
I am so glad my words are helpful for you. You are definitely on the path to implementing my teachings fully, and enjoying the wonderful invincible free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness) that comes with that. However, please do take note of the use of two of the six misery-inducing phrases in your newest reply above.

This part can be especially tricky. Beware (i.e. be aware) of the tricky trap and paradox of saying things like, "I shouldn't say should", or "I'm trying to not try", or "I must stop saying that I must do things since (as Scott/Eckhart wisely teaches) there's nothing I must do."

In a way, the paradox of it can lead to an infinite regress which theoretically could be infinitely sticky. You could accidentally say the word 'should', and then say, "I shouldn't have said should," and then say, "Oh no, I shouldn't have said that I shouldn't have said should", and then say "Oh boy, I shouldn't have said that I shouldn't have said that I shouldn't said should."

So that's why the book's teachings on (1) instant unconditional forgiveness and (2) fully and unconditionally accepting what you cannot control (including the behavior, choices, and statements of your past self are both so important.

In the powerful process of re-programming one's own mind, namely by avoiding using some words and dangerous pseudo-concepts, some powerful phrases that can help both when speaking to others and more importantly when speaking to yourself are expressions as the following:

"Actually, what I meant was..."

"Opps, I said should. A more accurate way to say what I mean is..."

"Actually, let me re-phrase that..."


With this and many other aspects of my teachings, a crucial element is learning how to notice and observe without judging or resenting or hating. That is why the word 'acceptance' and the concept it represents is so powerful: To accept that something exists and is the case, you have to observingly notice that it exists and is the case. The irony of the people who engage in the opposite (e.g. resentment, hate, judgementalism, unforgiveness, etc.) is that it tends to come from a place of non-acceptance, a sort of self-deceiving dishonest denial of the is-ness (i.e. unchangeable actuality) of the thing they resent/hate/judge/unforgive. With such people, there tends to be some kind of delusion in which they seem to think, for example, that by hatefully or judgmentally pointing at something that cannot be changed and saying "it shouldn't be the way it unchangeably is", they somehow make it be less.

My point being: If you notice yourself using one of the misery-inducing words (e.g. "should", "try" or "have to"), then fully and unconditionally accept that that happened. Notice it and observe it; that's all. It might sometimes seem counter-intutuvie or ironic, but the more you acceptingly notice and accepting observe it, the less you will be prone to resenting it or following up the occurrence with more resentful/hateful/judgemental words like 'should', 'ought', or 'try'. Nothing and fully accepting something that you cannot change is the antidote to trying to change it. It's like water to fire. Trying is almost always a symptom of some kind of denial, and shoulding is roughly simply instance of trying to change or reduce the is-ness of something that unchangably is, by judgmentally saying what it allegedly should be instead of non-judgmentally acknowledging what it simply is.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


The universe doesn't miscalculate. Reality is right.
The universe doesn't miscalculate. Reality is right.

---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Otieno Lydia
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Otieno Lydia »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: March 17th, 2023, 4:43 pm To be able to post in this topic, you must have purchased my book, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All. If you purchased the book, but are not able to post in this topic, please simply email a copy or picture of your receipt, or other proof of purchase to [email protected] and then I will give you access to post in this forum and topic. Please allow up to 48 hours after emailing your receipt for me to see the email and upgrade your account.
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Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your questions here.

Primarily, I am creating this topic for the sake of those who have signed up to be mentored by me. But anybody who has bought my book is welcome to post their questions for me here to get my advice about any topic, which will also help mentees since they may have similar questions about similar matters.

I am happy to offer my advice about and and all of the following:

If you are in my mentoring program or may want to take part in it in the future, please do use this opportunity--right here, right now--to post any and all questions you have for me.

This is not merely a favor from me. I am requesting you to do it for my sake too, and for the sake of everyone else in the mentoring program.

For those in my mentoring program, I am essentially insisting that you use this opportunity (starting now and moving forward), to ask any and all questions you have for me that don't need to be kept private. Unless there is some significant reason your question or my answer needs to be kept private, please ask it here now.

The reason is because this will save us all a lot of time. Many of my mentees will have the same or similar questions. Even when the questions are different, many times the answers and advice will still be the same. For example, the formula for "how to get really good at boxing" versus "how to get really good at dancing" will be almost entirely the same. The formula for "how to get my shoe-selling business off the ground" will be almost entirely the same as "how to get my hat-selling business off the ground". Reading my answer to one will likely answer the other, or at least mostly answer it such that you will have much fewer unanswered questions left, which will help us both greatly.

To illustrate the value here by example, I won't be able to mentor anyone effectively if I have the same ten-hour one-on-one private conversation with each person separately. That won't be good for you or for me. It would wreak the whole thing for everyone. Instead, we will reserve the time-consuming one-on-one private conversations for things that specifically need to be private.

I'm not just talking about killing two birds with one stone here. I'm talking about potentially killing millions of birds with one stone. It's much, much better for all of us. Don't worry about the birds, they are just figurative. No birds will be harmed in the making of this program.

One reason I have explained my reasoning for this post in this post in such detail is because I think that explaining myself as such will itself act as advice and help those I mentor. This concept of killing two birds (or more) with one stone is extremely crucial to the fundamental formula I use to be so successful in business, finances, and other areas. Wealth is not a zero-sum game. It can be created. So, like I encourage in my book, let's be creative!

My friends, I say, let's get our loving free-spirited creativity going! :D

Let's work together in a mutually beneficial way to create wealth and succeed together. After all, we are in this together.

For those who already signed up for my mentoring program, even if you have not yet completed the initial 100-day startup period (i.e. "Phase One"), please still use this opportunity to ask any and all questions you have for me now, both right now and as they pop up in your head or come up in your life moving forward.

I'm here for you, right here in this thread.

When replying, make sure the little box "Notify me when a reply is posted" is checked so that you get notifications of new posts.

I suggest you continually read through all the questions by others, and then if even partly applicable to you, read through my answer to them.

One reason is because of the role of reasoning from first principles that will often come up in my answers. While superficially it might at first seem that a question is unrelated to your own life, when you read my long in-depth answer, especially the logic and reasoning behind the answer, you will likely see that those first principles from which I reason, and thus much if not all of the reasoning itself, apply greatly if not just as much or more to your unique situation. More interestingly, seeing how seemingly different problems can be resolved and solved by the same few fundamental processes will indirectly teach you those tools as well, so that you can solve your own problems in the future without having to ask me, both in terms of (1) teaching the incredible empowering value of these tools and (2) teaching you by example what they are and how to use them.

By reading my replies to others in this topic, you will not only be getting mentored by me, but you will also be learning how to mentor others (and in sense mentor yourself). You will not only be getting the fish you want, you will be at the same being shown how to fish and how to provide fish for others. There we go killing two birds with one stone again. ;)


With all that said, let's do it! Fire away! Please ask your questions now. I am happy to do my best to give you my best advice about anything. Right here, right now.




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How can I identify my ideal career path?
Otieno Lydia
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Otieno Lydia »

How can I effectively network to enhance my career opportunities?
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Re: Public Q&A for My Mentees (or Anyone Who Wants My Advice) -- If you want my advice about anything, post your Qs here

Post by Jessica Azuka »

Thanks a bunch for this opportunity. It's thoughtful and rare. My question is: how do you deal with anxiety? For someone that is afraid of failure or afraid or risks and plans failing?
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