To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Nehap17
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Nehap17 »

Well said!! You're the only one that ends up burning in its fire and processing the agony of the wrongdoing inside of yourself. Neither the perpetrator nor the audience are the ones affected!!
sanjeev maurya
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by sanjeev maurya »

Your viewpoint highlights the connection between inner turmoil and external actions, emphasizing how one's internal state of being can profoundly impact their perception of the world and subsequent behavior. The idea that those who perpetrate brutal acts often do so from a place of deep-rooted misery within themselves is a powerful observation. It echoes the understanding that those who spread hate are often consumed by it, trapped in their own cycle of suffering.

Your stance on hate and the acknowledgment that harboring such feelings creates a personal hell resonates with the notion that inner peace and spiritual freedom are antidotes to such misery. The contrast between those trapped in their suffering and those who've found peace through self-discipline and spiritual freedom is stark and thought-provoking.

The idea that the pursuit of aggressive, forceful change, even if under the guise of saving the world, may stem from an individual's unresolved inner turmoil showcases the complexity of human motivations and the impact of personal struggles on broader actions.

Your approach seems rooted in fostering inner peace and compassion, creating a ripple effect that positively influences interactions and relationships. It's a perspective that emphasizes the transformative power of self-awareness and peace in navigating life's challenges. How do you think this philosophy could be applied on a broader scale to promote understanding and harmony in the world?
Akinyi Jane
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Akinyi Jane »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: March 31st, 2023, 5:42 pm This is a discussion forum topic for the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.


In my earlier topic, Whether you are looking for a savior or someone to save, or both, look into a mirror. In that topic, I write, in part:

Scott wrote: December 9th, 2022, 6:22 pm Many times, people aren't really looking to be happy--meaning to have consistent inner peace--but rather looking for an excuse or scapegoat for their misery.

There's no shortage of unhappy people wanting to give you advice, if not put a literal or metaphorical gun to your head and force you to take their literally miserable advice and live by their literally miserable standards. Many would rule the world because they cannot rule themselves, at least not in a way that lets them be truly happy with inner peace.

[Read Full Post]

The false miserable idea that the world is awful and desperately needs to be saved--by any means necessary no matter how aggressively violent and brutal--is typically a symptom of the violent saver's own persistent deep-rooted misery, meaning their lack of the true happiness that is inner peace and spiritual freedom.

Once we see that, it becomes easier to understand how even the Nazis thought they were the good guys, whose ends justified their means. So too is it surely true of the brutal murderers committing brutal honor killings. The destructive bloody horror of what such a person honestly sees as 'doing good ' reflects the spiritual misery in their own heart and the horrible self-created hell in which they themselves live.

I have hate in my heart for nobody. To have such hate in your heart is be in hell, and we see that miserable hellish hate manifest accordingly in people's actions. They don't just hurt those hate because to hate at all to hate reality itself as a whole; it's to look at the world as a timeless whole and say, "if this (i.e. timeless reality as an eternal unchanging whole) was created by a God, that God did bad job."

In some ways, I can sympathize with the most brutal most of all. I don't wish to be like them, but sometimes I can most easily say of them: Forgive them, for they know what they do. That is because, in a way, they are the most misguided. While it is mostly if not entirely self-created, they are utterly blinded by their own deep hellish suffering and their own lack of spiritual freedom. The miserable dominate the world because they lack self-discipline. The miserable want to dominate and control the world because the lack true self-determination.

In the words of Alan Watts, all the do-gooders are troublemakers.

For those who follow the teachings of my book, whether because they read it or just happen to otherwise, the opposite is the case. We have the consistent true happiness that is inner peace and spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline). Our loving free-spirited inner peace is reflected in our actions, our art, our kindness, and even our eyes. You can see it and feel it when you talk to one of us, or even when you sit in silence nearby. We have heaven in our hearts. Our cups overflow with it. We can't help but spill some of it on you.


With love,
Scott






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Harboring hate can create a turbulent inner state, affecting one's well-being and relationships. Choosing empathy and understanding can lead to a more peaceful existence.
Jessica Azuka
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Jessica Azuka »

Indeed, harbouring hate in one's heart is very inconvenient and indeed, such a person is miserable. However, I feel that to change some things in this world, some forceful measures need to be taken.
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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Jessica Azuka wrote: January 3rd, 2024, 10:11 am Indeed, harbouring hate in one's heart is very inconvenient and indeed, such a person is miserable. However, I feel that to change some things in this world, some forceful measures need to be taken.
I essentially agree, but just as matter of semantics and connotation, I prefer to consider myself to be graceful rather than forceful. Interestingly, I find it tends to actually be more productive and effective anyway. I do without trying, and in fact I never try, but (perhaps ironically) those who try hardest seem to actually accomplish the least, presumably in large part due to their lack of grace and gracefulness, among their confusion between doing and trying. :)

Perhaps the most epitomizing example of the different between forcefulness and gracefulness, and by extension the principle of wu wei in general, is the difference between aggression (which is unassertive) versus true assertiveness. That difference is explained and explored in the following topic of mine:

Aggression vs. True Assertiveness | No means no, yes means yes, and everything else generally means nothing.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Zanne Crystle
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Zanne Crystle »

"Don’t allow the roots of negativity to spread in your heart, it'll turn your heart black, and tear your world apart." - Sulekha Pande

Sometimes people do things that hurt us. It's easy to blame them for ruining our lives and feel angry or sad. But holding onto these negative emotions only harms us, not them. We have a choice to let go of the past and move on. Sometimes, it helps to think about why the other person acted the way they did. Maybe they were going through a difficult time and their behavior wasn't really about us? We might never fully understand their motivations, but we can begin to let it go and find peace in our hearts. It isn't always easy, but it's important for our well-being. With time, we can release the chains of anger and resentment and move towards a happier future.
Jay Lu
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Jay Lu »

Holding hate in one's heart is akin to living in a personal hell, often reflected in destructive behaviors and worldviews. The belief that the world is terrible and needs saving, even through violent means, usually stems from personal deep-rooted misery and a lack of true happiness, which is inner peace and spiritual freedom. Understanding this, we can see that even those committing terrible acts may believe they are doing good, blinded by their own suffering and lack of spiritual clarity. In contrast, those who follow the teachings of inner peace and spiritual freedom, as discussed in my book, demonstrate this serenity in their actions, art, and presence. They carry a sense of heaven in their hearts, evident in their peaceful and loving demeanor.
Angus Zonny
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Angus Zonny »

Yes. Hate is terrible and one needs to let go of hate in order to grow. It is a learning process to healing
Joseph Maroro
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Joseph Maroro »

When faced with situations where we may disagree or feel disheartened by someone's actions or words, adopting a mindset that acknowledges our ability to control our reactions is key. By choosing understanding over hatred, we open ourselves to the possibility of empathy and compassion. This perspective allows us to navigate conflicts with a more thoughtful and measured response, fostering better communication and promoting harmony in our interactions with others. Ultimately, our reactions shape not only our own well-being but also contribute to the overall tone of our relationships and the environment we create.
Ronald Aminga
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Ronald Aminga »

The destructive nature of such emotions can lead to harmful behavior and a negative impact on both the individual and those around them. Finding ways to cultivate understanding and empathy is crucial to break free from this cycle of misery.
Magrine Moegi
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Magrine Moegi »

When hate resides within, it acts as a corrosive force, eroding the foundations of inner peace and contentment. It cultivates a perpetual state of emotional unrest, clouding judgment and hindering the ability to experience genuine happiness. This internal turmoil often extends beyond the self, impacting relationships and interactions with the world.

In contrast, choosing compassion and understanding opens the door to personal liberation. It involves acknowledging differences, embracing empathy, and cultivating a mindset that seeks to comprehend rather than condemn. This shift in perspective not only fosters emotional well-being but also contributes to the creation of a more harmonious and interconnected society. By letting go of hate, one can embark on a transformative journey towards a brighter, more compassionate existence.
Osakwe Emmanuel
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Osakwe Emmanuel »

Hate is a powerful emotion that doesn't just sit quietly in someone's heart. It grows and takes over. People who hate others can become obsessed with it. They spend a lot of time thinking about the person or thing they hate, making plans, and sometimes even taking action. It's like an addiction that consumes them. It's important to learn to forgive and move on. Holding onto hate only brings more pain and suffering, like being trapped in a state of constant misery.
Ije Bons
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Ije Bons »

Yes. To hate draining and it takes a lot of your life energy from you.i don't like and understand it. Being free from hate brings peace.
Emeka JohnObi
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Emeka JohnObi »

Hate feels like a heavy anchor, dragging me down into darkness. It might be aimed at someone else, but it's me who's drowning in negativity. Letting go, even if it's hard, is the only way to resurface for some sunshine
Chidinma Dijeh
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Re: To have hate in your heart is to be in hell.

Post by Chidinma Dijeh »

This quote powerfully expresses the destructive nature of hatred. It suggests that holding onto negativity ultimately harms ourselves more than others.
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