Ten Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts')

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Ten Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts')

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

This is a discussion forum topic for the Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.


As those who read my book already know, I don't believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts'.

Accordingly, I don't believe anything happens that '"shouldn't" happen. I don't ever look at some aspect of unchangeable reality, and resentfully think, "It shouldn't be the way it unchangably is!"

In other words, I believe the would-be concept of 'should-ness' and 'should-not-ness' do not exist.

Thus, I don't believe there is anything you 'should' do. Likewise, I don't believe there is anything you 'should' not do.

For example, I neither believe you 'should' drink coffee tomorrow, nor do I believe you 'should' not drink coffee tomorrow.

The same is true of myself: I don't believe I 'should' drink coffee tomorrow; and I don't believe I 'should' not drink coffee tomorrow.

I have freedom of spirit (a.k.a. self-discipline) because I don't believe I'm bound or enslaved by any kind of 'shoulds' or 'oughts'--things I believe are imaginary phantoms. They are just superstitions, closely linked to judgementalism, especially moralizing self-righteous judgementalism. But an enslaving devil, nightmare, or phantom doesn't need to be real to enslave and torture you just the same. The inventive imagining mind can be a torturous master.

Instead, I believe in choice. When it comes to my choices, I always get exactly what I want, meaning what I choose. :)

Thus, you will never hear me (or anyone else who follows the teaching of my book) say something like "I shouldn't be eating this" while putting it in my mouth, whatever it is. No, we have spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline).

Likewise, as someone who practices the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting that which I cannot change, I absolutely don't look at things I cannot change and engage in resentful judgementalism by tossing around judgemental words like 'should' and 'ought', such as by saying things like, "That thing that happened in the past shouldn't have happened! I wish I could change the past. The past should be different than it is!", or "That thing I cannot change should not be the way it is!", or "The weather shouldn't be the way it is! It should be different!"

Most people who haven't read my book do believe in 'shoulds'. And even some people who have read my book still believe in them, thereby refusing to follow some of the 11 suggestions at the end of the book (namely Suggestion #4).

(Interestingly, most people who read my book agree with it all once they've read it, even though most don't agree with its conclusions before reading. In other words, my book is one of those special kinds of books that actually changes minds and changes lives and gives most readers a totally new perspective on life.)

For those of you who do still believe should-not-have-ness exists, I have some questions below I would love for you to answer. These aren't rhetorical questions. I am genuinely curious to know your answers. I love learning about different viewpoints and perspectives.


1. Can you give me some specific examples of something that happened that "shouldn't" have happened?

2. Can you give me some specific examples of a person or thing that "shouldn't" be the way it is at the time that it is that way?

3. Can you give me an example of something that "should" be happening right now (relative to you in your present in spacetime) but isn't?

4. In regard to those things or events that allegedly "shouldn't" be the way they were/are, are those things that are within your control (i.e. a matter of your choice)?

5. Are these things that you can change, or are they things that you cannot change?

6. Do you (like me) firmly practice the principle of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting that which you cannot control (a.k.a. that which you cannot change)?


7. Is it possible that when you say something "shouldn't" be the way it is that you are speaking gibberish (i.e. saying something that doesn't actually mean anything, at least not anything coherent)?

8. As you use the words, what would it mean to say some unchangeable aspect of reality (e.g. the past) shouldn't be the way it unchangeably is?

9. For example, as you use the words, what does it mean to say, "2 + 2 should not equal 4"?

10. What does it mean to say "That hurricane that happened yesterday shouldn't have happened"?



I look forward to your answers! :D


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott




no-shoulds.jpg


In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program, both for the free option and the paid option.
Last edited by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes on April 24th, 2024, 12:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Leonie Vermaak »

I am on #6 with you. I firmly believe everything happens for a reason. We might not always agree with what happened or happens, but whether a person think it shouldn't have happened the fact still remains, it DID happen. My favorite saying to accepting things we can't change is: 'It is what it is.'
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Kajori Sheryl Paul »

After reading "In It Together ", I am convinced that everything that happens, happens for a reason. There is nothing that should not or ought not be.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Leonie Vermaak wrote: October 13th, 2023, 8:29 am I am on #6 with you. I firmly believe everything happens for a reason. We might not always agree with what happened or happens, but whether a person think it shouldn't have happened the fact still remains, it DID happen. My favorite saying to accepting things we can't change is: 'It is what it is.'
Hi, Leonie Vermaak,

Thank you for your reply! :)

What does it mean to "agree with what happens" or "disagree with what happens"?

I can agree that something happened. For instance, if there was a hurricane yesterday, I can agree that the hurricane happened. (Or, I can disagree, meaning claim it didn't happen.) But I don't know what it would mean to say, "I agree with the hurricane happening yesterday," or "I disagree with the hurricane happening yesterday." In other words, I don't know what it would mean for me to say, "I agree that the hurricane happened yesterday, but I disagree with having happened."

Can you explain a bit more what you mean by those phrases?

I suspect it may be something I covered in my topic, Concepts of preference only make sense when it comes to your choices (i.e. what's in your control).

The other side of that same point in that topic is that concepts of truth (and falsehood) and agreement (and disagreement) only make sense in regard to objective propositions (i.e. meaningful statements that have an objective truth value).

The human mind is prone to something often called "overthinking", which produces a lot of anxiety, superstitions, and confusion. The human mind is prone to asking questions that don't make sense and giving incoherent answers to questions that don't make sense. It doesn't tend to say, "I don't know", and then be quiet with a smile, even if that is the most accurate answer and most reasonable response. When asked what it thinks about something, it doesn't tend to say, "I don't think about that," and then be quiet with a smile, even if that would be the most honest, accurate, and reasonable response. Rather than be quiet and peaceful, the brain tends to incessantly judge things by applying rating concepts that don't make sense to things they don't to which they don't apply (e.g. applying truth concepts as true/false/agree/disagree to non-propositions, or applying preference concept to non-choices).

All human minds do that to some extent, but the path of inner peace my book teaches isn't primarily about reducing let alone eliminating the judgemental nonsense the brain tends to incessantly thinks, but simply realizing you don't need to believe it or be attached to it. If the mind lies or says some judgemental gibberish, which generally all humans do a lot, you can just notice it with a spiritual smile without agreeing or believing it. In other words, that form of inner peace is just a matter of realizing you aren't the thinker of those nonsense thoughts, or any thoughts, but rather the listener.

I can agree that an event happened, but it's incoherent (as I use the terms) to say I agree with the event itself that happened.

I can agree that you have (or someone has) a certain subjective opinion, but (strictly speaking) I cannot agree with that subjective opinion; I can only happen to share or not share it at certain time. For example, if you think peanut butter tastes bad, and I think better tastes good, we are not actually disagreeing.

In other words, I can only agree with a proposition, i.e. meaning statements that have an objective truth value.




With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Mounce574 »

To Me, if something "should have" or "should not have" then it didn't happen or it happen. Should doesn't change anything and thinking it does is wasting time on what you can make happen.
"Facts don't care about your feelings." Ben Shapiro
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Rahul Singh 29 »

I think what is happening is happening for good and what is going to happen will happen for good. Always take good things from your life and experiences and learn from your failures and mistakes. Rest leave on fortune. We have no control over what is happening and what will be going to happen, we are just a part of it. May be it nature or some omnipotent being who is controls everything. I believe that whatever is happening is happening for good and we all have to play our role in it. The interesting thing is we can choose a positive role or negative but we cannot sit ideal and watch what's happening because if we do sit ideal no one in history will recognize us. So whenever you get chance to pick a side, choose your side carefully because history will remember your contributions, either in a positive way or in a negative way.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Leonie Vermaak »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 13th, 2023, 11:43 am
Leonie Vermaak wrote: October 13th, 2023, 8:29 am I am on #6 with you. I firmly believe everything happens for a reason. We might not always agree with what happened or happens, but whether a person think it shouldn't have happened the fact still remains, it DID happen. My favorite saying to accepting things we can't change is: 'It is what it is.'
Hi, Leonie Vermaak,

Thank you for your reply! :)

What does it mean to "agree with what happens" or "disagree with what happens"?

I can agree that something happened. For instance, if there was a hurricane yesterday, I can agree that the hurricane happened. (Or, I can disagree, meaning claim it didn't happen.) But I don't know what it would mean to say, "I agree with the hurricane happening yesterday," or "I disagree with the hurricane happening yesterday." In other words, I don't know what it would mean for me to say, "I agree that the hurricane happened yesterday, but I disagree with having happened."

Can you explain a bit more what you mean by those phrases?

I suspect it may be something I covered in my topic, Concepts of preference only make sense when it comes to your choices (i.e. what's in your control).

The other side of that same point in that topic is that concepts of truth (and falsehood) and agreement (and disagreement) only make sense in regard to objective propositions (i.e. meaningful statements that have an objective truth value).

The human mind is prone to something often called "overthinking", which produces a lot of anxiety, superstitions, and confusion. The human mind is prone to asking questions that don't make sense and giving incoherent answers to questions that don't make sense. It doesn't tend to say, "I don't know", and then be quiet with a smile, even if that is the most accurate answer and most reasonable response. When asked what it thinks about something, it doesn't tend to say, "I don't think about that," and then be quiet with a smile, even if that would be the most honest, accurate, and reasonable response. Rather than be quiet and peaceful, the brain tends to incessantly judge things by applying rating concepts that don't make sense to things they don't to which they don't apply (e.g. applying truth concepts as true/false/agree/disagree to non-propositions, or applying preference concept to non-choices).

All human minds do that to some extent, but the path of inner peace my book teaches isn't primarily about reducing let alone eliminating the judgemental nonsense the brain tends to incessantly thinks, but simply realizing you don't need to believe it or be attached to it. If the mind lies or says some judgemental gibberish, which generally all humans do a lot, you can just notice it with a spiritual smile without agreeing or believing it. In other words, that form of inner peace is just a matter of realizing you aren't the thinker of those nonsense thoughts, or any thoughts, but rather the listener.

I can agree that an event happened, but it's incoherent (as I use the terms) to say I agree with the event itself that happened.

I can agree that you have (or someone has) a certain subjective opinion, but (strictly speaking) I cannot agree with that subjective opinion; I can only happen to share or not share it at certain time. For example, if you think peanut butter tastes bad, and I think better tastes good, we are not actually disagreeing.

In other words, I can only agree with a proposition, i.e. meaning statements that have an objective truth value.




With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a.
Hi there.
I read my answer again and realized that I was vague. So, I hope I'll answer this question better now, structure what I want to say better :D. Say the hurricane happened, I would agree with the fact that it did, but it's not to say that I have to like the fact that it happened. So basically, what I meant to say was that a person might agree with something that happened (like a hurricane) but it's not to say that a person will like the fact that it did happen. Althought we would like to control everything that happens in our lives we can't. Whether we like or don't like what happens in life, we have to accept it, as we can't change it.

I truly hope that I managed to express myself better with this answer.

Thanks so much for giving me a chance to explain myself.

You are a wonderful mentor and I do admire your work.

Love
Leonie.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Victory Ositaorah »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 13th, 2023, 2:10 am This is a discussion forum topic for the Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.


As those who read my book already know, I don't believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts'.

Accordingly, I don't believe anything happens that '"shouldn't" happen. I don't ever look at some aspect of unchangeable reality, and resentfully think, "It shouldn't be the way it unchangably is!"

In other words, I believe the would-be concept of 'should-ness' and 'should-not-ness' do not exist.

Thus, I don't believe there is anything you 'should' do. Likewise, I don't believe there is anything you 'should' not do.

For example, I neither believe you 'should' drink coffee tomorrow, nor do I believe you 'should' not drink coffee tomorrow.

The same is true of myself: I don't believe I 'should' drink coffee tomorrow; and I don't believe I 'should' not drink coffee tomorrow.

I have freedom of spirit (a.k.a. self-discipline) because I don't believe I'm bound or enslaved by any kind of 'shoulds' or 'oughts'--things I believe are imaginary phantoms. They are just superstitions, closely linked to judgementalism, especially moralizing self-righteous judgementalism. But an enslaving devil, nightmare, or phantom doesn't need to be real to enslave and torture you just the same. The inventive imagining mind can be a torturous master.

Instead, I believe in choice. When it comes to my choices, I always get exactly what I want, meaning what I choose. :)

Thus, you will never hear me (or anyone else who follows the teaching of my book) say something like "I shouldn't be eating this" while putting it in my mouth, whatever it is. No, we have spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline).

Likewise, as someone who practices the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting that which I cannot change, I absolutely don't look at things I cannot change and engage in resentful judgementalism by tossing around judgemental words like 'should' and 'ought', such as by saying things like, "That thing that happened in the past shouldn't have happened! I wish I could change the past. The past should be different than it is!", or "That thing I cannot change should not be the way it is!", or "The weather shouldn't be the way it is! It should be different!"

Most people who haven't read my book do believe in 'shoulds'. And even some people who have read my book still believe in them, thereby refusing to follow some of the 11 suggestions at the end of the book (namely Suggestion #4).

(Interestingly, most people who read my book agree with it all once they've read it, even though most don't agree with its conclusions before reading. In other words, my book is one of those special kinds of books that actually changes minds and changes lives and gives most readers a totally new perspective on life.)

For those of you who do still believe should-not-have-ness exists, I have some questions below I would love for you to answer. These aren't rhetorical questions. I am genuinely curious to know your answers. I love learning about different viewpoints and perspectives.


1. Can you give me some specific examples of something that happened that "shouldn't" have happened?

2. Can you give me some specific examples of a person or thing that "shouldn't" be the way it is?

3. Can you give me an example of something that "should" be happening right now (relative to you in your present in spacetime) but isn't?

4. In regard to those things or events that allegedly "shouldn't" be the way they were/are, are these things that are within your control (i.e. a matter of your choice)?

5. Are these things that you can change, or are they things that you cannot change?

6. Do you (like me) firmly practice the principle of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting that which you cannot control (a.k.a. that which you cannot change)?


I look forward to your answers! :D


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott





no-shoulds.jpg



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program, both for the free option and the paid option.
I don't believe should-not-have-ness exists, I believe all actions are predestined.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Rob »

Hi Eckhart,

Regarding "shoulds" and "shouldn't," here's how I see it ...

The one should I accept as a "should" is this: I "should" learn the art of becoming all I came here to experience myself to be.

And the only way I can experience myself in all of my glory, is with the existence of opposites.

Trying to avoid the opposites-game, while living in a world of polarity, is to shout out, "This shouldn't be!"

Shouting, "This should or shouldn't be" is an act of insanity; it is refusal to look at reality. That's a sign of immaturity.

Ergo, When it comes to my evolution as a human being, in an environment of polarity, I never seek a state of peace, which cannot be disturbed.

Such an imperturbable state of peacefulness is useless... that is when it comes to my growth and enhancement as a member of the human community.

In fact, imperturbable peacefulness will be trouble for me. I will sit silently, no longer being productive; no longer making-a-difference-in-the-world.

The truth is - while I'm alive in human form, still the CEO of two businesses with 40 employees, plus being an author, and currently getting my PHD in philosophy from an esteemed college ... imperturbable peace would become a cause of stress for me :)

Okay, now let me change my first statement (above). I am going to let go of the word, "Should" by replacing it with the word, "want." The one want I accept as an important want... I want to learn the art of becoming all I came here to experience myself to be.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Rob wrote: November 29th, 2023, 8:21 pm Hi Eckhart,

Regarding "shoulds" and "shouldn't," here's how I see it ...

The one should I accept as a "should" is this: I "should" learn the art of becoming all I came here to experience myself to be.

And the only way I can experience myself in all of my glory, is with the existence of opposites.

Trying to avoid the opposites-game, while living in a world of polarity, is to shout out, "This shouldn't be!"

Shouting, "This should or shouldn't be" is an act of insanity; it is refusal to look at reality. That's a sign of immaturity.

Ergo, When it comes to my evolution as a human being, in an environment of polarity, I never seek a state of peace, which cannot be disturbed.

Such an imperturbable state of peacefulness is useless... that is when it comes to my growth and enhancement as a member of the human community.

In fact, imperturbable peacefulness will be trouble for me. I will sit silently, no longer being productive; no longer making-a-difference-in-the-world.

The truth is - while I'm alive in human form, still the CEO of two businesses with 40 employees, plus being an author, and currently getting my PHD in philosophy from an esteemed college ... imperturbable peace would become a cause of stress for me :)

Okay, now let me change my first statement (above). I am going to let go of the word, "Should" by replacing it with the word, "want." The one want I accept as an important want... I want to learn the art of becoming all I came here to experience myself to be.
Hi, Rob,

Thanks for your comments. Can you also post your answer to each one of the six questions separately, preferably by number so I can match each answer to each question?


Thank you,
Eckhart Aurelius
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Shirley Labzentis »

This is probably going to be a very unpopular post, but here it is.

In answer to #1 - The specific thing that should not have happened is that Donald Trump should not have been elected President of the United States. There I said it!
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango »

Hi, I am replying to No.6
Absolutely, I do my best to practice that principle. It's often challenging, but I've learned that accepting what I can't control brings peace of mind and allows me to direct my energy towards what I can influence. It's about acknowledging life's uncertainties and choosing not to let them consume me. Embracing this mindset has helped me navigate through difficult situations and focus on positive actions, rather than dwelling on things beyond my control.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Amy Jackson »

Here are my answers to the 6 questions:

1. Something that happened... - someone dying in his prime.

2. Person that shouldn't be as is... - a child born disabled.

3. Something happening right now... - Investing my millions of dollars 😀

4. Are they within my control? Only no.3.

5. Can I change them? Only no.3. I can't change the rest.

6. I won't say FIRMLY practice it, but I've learnt that there's no need giving myself headache over things I can't do anything about.

So what do my answers make me? 😊
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Shirley Labzentis wrote: December 2nd, 2023, 7:22 pm This is probably going to be a very unpopular post, but here it is.

In answer to #1 - The specific thing that should not have happened is that Donald Trump should not have been elected President of the United States. There I said it!
Hi, Shirley Labzentis,

If you don't mind, can you answer all six questions rather than just one?


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango wrote: December 4th, 2023, 4:39 am Hi, I am replying to No.6
Absolutely, I do my best to practice that principle. It's often challenging, but I've learned that accepting what I can't control brings peace of mind and allows me to direct my energy towards what I can influence. It's about acknowledging life's uncertainties and choosing not to let them consume me. Embracing this mindset has helped me navigate through difficult situations and focus on positive actions, rather than dwelling on things beyond my control.
Hi, Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango,

If you don't mind, can you answer all six questions rather than just one?


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Launchpad Republic: America's Entrepreneurial Edge and Why It Matters

Launchpad Republic: America's Entrepreneurial Edge and Why It Matters
by Howard Wolk
July 2024

Quest: Finding Freddie: Reflections from the Other Side

Quest: Finding Freddie: Reflections from the Other Side
by Thomas Richard Spradlin
June 2024

Neither Safe Nor Effective

Neither Safe Nor Effective
by Dr. Colleen Huber
May 2024

Now or Never

Now or Never
by Mary Wasche
April 2024

Meditations

Meditations
by Marcus Aurelius
March 2024

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

The In-Between: Life in the Micro

The In-Between: Life in the Micro
by Christian Espinosa
January 2024

2023 Philosophy Books of the Month

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise
by John K Danenbarger
January 2023

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul
by Mitzi Perdue
February 2023

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness
by Chet Shupe
March 2023

The Unfakeable Code®

The Unfakeable Code®
by Tony Jeton Selimi
April 2023

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021