Ten Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts')

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 13th, 2023, 2:10 am 3. Can you give me an example of something that "should" be happening right now (relative to you in your present in spacetime) but isn't?
Amy Jackson wrote: January 28th, 2024, 9:24 am 3. Something happening right now... - Investing my millions of dollars 😀
I suspect if you had let go of shoulds a long time ago, and instead followed the incredibly empowering and enriching teachings of my book, such as but limited to firmly practicing the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting what you cannot control, then you would have already achieved your wildest goals, such as making a million dollars if that's truly your #1 external goal. Here is a great topic about how following the teachings of my book (instead of wastefully believing in shoulds and should-not-have-ness) leads to incredible external sucess and god-like seemingly supernatural power and grace:

Just love everything and thereby become supernaturally powerful. | #Übermensch #Superhuman #JustLoveEverything


These topics are also related to the same:

- My Three Principles for Happiness and Success (in that order!) | Be Happy and Achieve Incredible Success Guaranteed

- Success is a choice.

- Whether you are looking for a savior or someone to save, or both, look into a mirror.

- Beware: The phrase "work hard" can be just as dishonest and dangerous as the word "try". Be very careful with it! [Failure is an illusion, and success is a choice.]


Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 13th, 2023, 2:10 am 4. In regard to those things or events that allegedly "shouldn't" be the way they were/are, are these things that are within your control (i.e. a matter of your choice)?
Amy Jackson wrote: January 28th, 2024, 9:24 am 4. Are they within my control? Only no.3.
***
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 13th, 2023, 2:10 am 5. Are these things that you can change, or are they things that you cannot change?
Amy Jackson wrote: January 28th, 2024, 9:24 am 5. Can I change them? Only no.3. I can't change the rest.

So, to be clear, you have resentment, hate, and/or unacceptable towards thing you cannot control; Correct?

If you let go of that, you will be much more successful at your stated goals.

The key word there is stated. There is a big difference between a stated goal and a real goal/choice. When those two things don't happen to be the exact same thing (which is the case with most humans), then that creates an illusion of failure. One allegedly "fails" at the stated goal to which they allegedly "try" to achieve while, in reality, succeeding at their real goals/choices.

When it comes to your choices, you always get exactly what you want, meaning what you choose. When it comes to everything else (i.e. that which you do not control), it is covered by the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting what you do not control, which can be remembered with simple mantras such as reality is right by definition, the universe doesn't miscalculate, and whatever it is, it is what it is.

In other words, as I've said many times before, trying is lying, failure is an illusion, and success is a choice. The adulter isn't a spouse trying to be faithful who fails, but rather someone who succeeds at cheating. That way of looking at things bring it full circle because it is actually a very accepting and loving and inner-peace-consistent (a.k.a. true happiness-manifesting) way of looking at things: Everyone and everything is a success. They aren't failing to be something or failing to be anything; they are what they are and they are succeeding at being themselves. Bees don't fail to be trees, and trees don't fail to be bees. They are succeeding at being what they are and doing what they do, especially when it comes to concept like spirituality (i.e. consciousness and the real you) and choice. Nothing is "failing" to be what it "should" be at that moment that it is what it is, but rather it is succeeding at being what it is in the moment that it is what it is.

In analogy, the drinking alcoholic doesn't fail to be sober, even if his stated goal is to be sober, but rather he is successful at drinking.

You can say your goal is to make a million dollars or such, but if you willfully choose to spend even one tiny bit of your incredibly valuable and very limited time or energy on resentment, unforgiveness, hate, or other forms of unacceptance or shoulding, then your stated goal is not your real goal, and instead you are and will be succeeding at your real goal (a.k.a. choice), which is to spend your valuable, very limited time and energy on shoulding, resentment, and/or unacceptance. If your real goal was something else, you wouldn't counter-productively waste your very valuable and limited time and energy on resentment and shoulding.

As the previously linked topic says, just love everything and thereby become supernaturally powerful, or choose to instead waste some of your incredibly valuable time or energy on resenting (a.k.a. shoulding on) things outside of your control instead of choosing to firmly and stubbornly practice the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting that which you cannot control, with an acceptance so full and unconditional it warrants the word love.

The choice is yours, and either choice is fine.

Would you rather be resentful or insanely powerful and wealthy (or whatever goal you could choose besides spending your energy being resentful)? If you choose resentful, that's totally fine to me. I won't resent you for it. I don't even resent resenters. To each their own. Bees like to drink blood, and I don't. It's just beautiful diversity, which is a necessarily ingredient for the world exist. In a manner of speaking, killer hurricanes like to kill, and world-destorying asteroiods like to destroy worlds. To each its own.

What will you choose? There's no wrong answer, because whichever you choose you will get it. Whether you choose miserable expensive resentment or choose incredibly god-like power and grace and the external success that comes with that, you will get what you choose, and so I shall continue to say of you and everyone and everything, good for you; you are what you are; you get what you choose; and that's beautiful and heavenly.


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


Mother Nature and all of creation is so deeply and infinitely beautiful, even though most humans are very spoiled children deeply lacking in self-responsibility and self-discipline (a.k.a. spiritual freedom).
Mother Nature and all of creation is so deeply and infinitely beautiful, even though most humans are very spoiled children deeply lacking in self-responsibility and self-discipline (a.k.a. spiritual freedom).



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Donald Cecil Hufstedler »

I understand that you hold a strong belief in the absence of "shoulds" and "oughts" and that you emphasize the importance of choice and acceptance in your perspective. You argue that the concepts of "should-ness" and "should-not-ness" are imaginary and that embracing choice and unconditional acceptance leads to spiritual freedom and self-discipline.

Your viewpoint encourages individuals to focus on their own choices and desires rather than being bound by external expectations or judgments. By embracing the principle of accepting what cannot be changed, you advocate for an approach that avoids resentful judgment and allows for personal growth and freedom.

Examples of something that "shouldn't" have happened can vary greatly depending on individual perspectives and beliefs. It could include acts of violence or harm, natural disasters, or personal misfortunes that individuals perceive as unfortunate or undesired.

Similarly, examples of a person or thing that "shouldn't" be the way they are can also be subjective. It might involve situations where individuals believe a person's behavior or characteristics are morally wrong or unacceptable based on their own values or societal norms.

The concept of something that "should" be happening right now but isn't is subjective and context-dependent. It could refer to personal goals or societal expectations that individuals believe are not being met.

The extent to which things are within one's control and a matter of choice can vary. Some situations may be influenced by personal choices and actions, while others may be beyond an individual's control.

Again, the ability to change certain things can vary. Some circumstances may be changeable through personal efforts or interventions, while others may be immutable or require acceptance of their unchangeable nature.

The practice of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting what cannot be controlled or changed is a perspective embraced by some individuals as a means to find peace, contentment, and personal growth. It can be a valuable approach for coping with circumstances that are beyond one's control.

It's important to recognize that these questions and their answers can be highly subjective and influenced by individual beliefs, perspectives, and life experiences. Different individuals may have different interpretations and approaches when it comes to accepting what cannot be changed and finding personal freedom.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Donald Cecil Hufstedler wrote: February 8th, 2024, 7:35 am I understand that you hold a strong belief in the absence of "shoulds" and "oughts" and that you emphasize the importance of choice and acceptance in your perspective. You argue that the concepts of "should-ness" and "should-not-ness" are imaginary and that embracing choice and unconditional acceptance leads to spiritual freedom and self-discipline.

Your viewpoint encourages individuals to focus on their own choices and desires rather than being bound by external expectations or judgments. By embracing the principle of accepting what cannot be changed, you advocate for an approach that avoids resentful judgment and allows for personal growth and freedom.

Examples of something that "shouldn't" have happened can vary greatly depending on individual perspectives and beliefs. It could include acts of violence or harm, natural disasters, or personal misfortunes that individuals perceive as unfortunate or undesired.

Similarly, examples of a person or thing that "shouldn't" be the way they are can also be subjective. It might involve situations where individuals believe a person's behavior or characteristics are morally wrong or unacceptable based on their own values or societal norms.

The concept of something that "should" be happening right now but isn't is subjective and context-dependent. It could refer to personal goals or societal expectations that individuals believe are not being met.

The extent to which things are within one's control and a matter of choice can vary. Some situations may be influenced by personal choices and actions, while others may be beyond an individual's control.

Again, the ability to change certain things can vary. Some circumstances may be changeable through personal efforts or interventions, while others may be immutable or require acceptance of their unchangeable nature.

The practice of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting what cannot be controlled or changed is a perspective embraced by some individuals as a means to find peace, contentment, and personal growth. It can be a valuable approach for coping with circumstances that are beyond one's control.

It's important to recognize that these questions and their answers can be highly subjective and influenced by individual beliefs, perspectives, and life experiences. Different individuals may have different interpretations and approaches when it comes to accepting what cannot be changed and finding personal freedom.
Hi, Donald Cecil Hufstedler,

Thank you for your reply, but please answer each of the six numbered questions in the Original Post (OP).


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Kenechukwu Okoye »

Yes to number #6, I do practice the principle of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting that which I cannot control. This principle is fundamental in managing stress and maintaining a balanced perspective in life. It's important to understand that there are things beyond our control, and accepting this can lead to a more peaceful and productive mindset.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Surabhi Rani »

I appreciate the concept of 'external success.' It appeals to me. It opens the door to a world of knowledge for me. Also, it triggers various thoughts related to the inner and true accomplishments in life within me. I have often wondered about the true possibility inherent in me. It's my main point of reflection and the philosophy of life. Everyone and everything is a success. Bees don't fail to be trees, and trees don't fail to be bees. We are succeeding at being what we are and doing what we do.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by CrisX »

I agree with you. There are not many situations that we cannot change. The majority is how we perceive and react. using words such as should or ought to, brings limiting beliefs to what we can do.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Afam Okonkwo »

6. Yes, I share your perspective on fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting what we cannot control or change. It's a powerful approach to living more peacefully and mindfully.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Jacy Covers »

I agree with you and I do believe that everything happens for a reason. The world is operational and works how it should be.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Emmanuel Asamoah 5 »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 13th, 2023, 2:10 am This is a discussion forum topic for the Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.


As those who read my book already know, I don't believe in 'shoulds' and 'oughts'.

Accordingly, I don't believe anything happens that '"shouldn't" happen. I don't ever look at some aspect of unchangeable reality, and resentfully think, "It shouldn't be the way it unchangably is!"

In other words, I believe the would-be concept of 'should-ness' and 'should-not-ness' do not exist.

Thus, I don't believe there is anything you 'should' do. Likewise, I don't believe there is anything you 'should' not do.

For example, I neither believe you 'should' drink coffee tomorrow, nor do I believe you 'should' not drink coffee tomorrow.

The same is true of myself: I don't believe I 'should' drink coffee tomorrow; and I don't believe I 'should' not drink coffee tomorrow.

I have freedom of spirit (a.k.a. self-discipline) because I don't believe I'm bound or enslaved by any kind of 'shoulds' or 'oughts'--things I believe are imaginary phantoms. They are just superstitions, closely linked to judgementalism, especially moralizing self-righteous judgementalism. But an enslaving devil, nightmare, or phantom doesn't need to be real to enslave and torture you just the same. The inventive imagining mind can be a torturous master.

Instead, I believe in choice. When it comes to my choices, I always get exactly what I want, meaning what I choose. :)

Thus, you will never hear me (or anyone else who follows the teaching of my book) say something like "I shouldn't be eating this" while putting it in my mouth, whatever it is. No, we have spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline).

Likewise, as someone who practices the principle of fully and unconditionally accepting that which I cannot change, I absolutely don't look at things I cannot change and engage in resentful judgementalism by tossing around judgemental words like 'should' and 'ought', such as by saying things like, "That thing that happened in the past shouldn't have happened! I wish I could change the past. The past should be different than it is!", or "That thing I cannot change should not be the way it is!", or "The weather shouldn't be the way it is! It should be different!"

Most people who haven't read my book do believe in 'shoulds'. And even some people who have read my book still believe in them, thereby refusing to follow some of the 11 suggestions at the end of the book (namely Suggestion #4).

(Interestingly, most people who read my book agree with it all once they've read it, even though most don't agree with its conclusions before reading. In other words, my book is one of those special kinds of books that actually changes minds and changes lives and gives most readers a totally new perspective on life.)

For those of you who do still believe should-not-have-ness exists, I have some questions below I would love for you to answer. These aren't rhetorical questions. I am genuinely curious to know your answers. I love learning about different viewpoints and perspectives.


1. Can you give me some specific examples of something that happened that "shouldn't" have happened?

2. Can you give me some specific examples of a person or thing that "shouldn't" be the way it is?

3. Can you give me an example of something that "should" be happening right now (relative to you in your present in spacetime) but isn't?

4. In regard to those things or events that allegedly "shouldn't" be the way they were/are, are these things that are within your control (i.e. a matter of your choice)?

5. Are these things that you can change, or are they things that you cannot change?

6. Do you (like me) firmly practice the principle of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting that which you cannot control (a.k.a. that which you cannot change)?


I look forward to your answers! :D


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott





no-shoulds.jpg



In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program, both for the free option and the paid option.
So Scott, being blind, especially in my case, was it bound to happen, should it happen, was it meant to happen. Don't I have the right to question why some people can see whatever is going on around them in the world while I cannot. I need a response please.
“There is beauty in our unity no matter how harsh that war is, and no matter the result or winner. There is beauty even in losing if we do it together."
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Tom Blake »

Specific examples of something that happened that "shouldn't" have happened could include instances of natural disasters causing harm to innocent people, acts of violence or injustice, or accidents resulting in unfortunate outcomes.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Tom Blake »

6. Yes, I firmly practice the principle of fully, totally, and unconditionally accepting that which I cannot control. This involves acknowledging the reality of situations, letting go of futile attempts to change the unchangeable, and focusing on what I can influence or change for the better.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Tom Blake »

4. In regard to those things or events that allegedly "shouldn't" be the way they were/are, they may or may not be within my control. While I cannot control external events or the actions of others, I can control my response and actions in the face of adversity.

5. These things may vary in terms of whether they can be changed or not. Some may be within my sphere of influence and can be changed through proactive efforts, while others may be beyond my control and require acceptance.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Ejoh Ebube »

This passage challenges the conventional notion of "shoulds" and "oughts," advocating for a perspective of unconditional acceptance and freedom of choice.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Ejoh Ebube »

It encourages readers to reconsider their beliefs about what "should" or "shouldn't" happen, highlighting the liberating power of embracing personal choice and spiritual freedom.
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Re: Six Questions for People Who Believe Should-Not-Have-Ness Exists (i.e. for people who believe in 'shoulds' and 'ough

Post by Ejoh Ebube »

The questions posed at the end invite readers to reflect on their own beliefs and experiences regarding the concept of "should-ness," fostering a deeper understanding of individual perspectives and attitudes towards acceptance and control.
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