To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him.

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

To post in this forum, you must buy and read the book. After buying the book, please email a copy of your receipt to [email protected] to be given access to this forum.
Forum rules
This forum is for discussing the book In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All. Anyone can view the forum and read the post, but only people who purchased the book can post in the forum.

If your purchased has not already been verified, please email a copy of your receipt to [email protected] to be given access to this forum.
Post Reply
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5576
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.


A crucial key in my free mentoring program and my general system for achieving incredible success is this: utilizing the incredible power of micro-habits.

It is done, in large part, by purposefully and intentionally avoiding creating new macro-habits, meaning avoiding massive abrupt uses of your precious limited willpower.

My system entails you being extremely stingy with your willpower, and then, even when you do use it, you only slowly use it with great hesitation and tentativeness.

In analogy, if you rush through switching gears or attempt to accelerate too quickly in a car, especially one with manual transmission and especially if you aren't yet an experienced expert in such aggressive driving, you can easily stall or even do damage to the car and break it. Don't treat the gas pedal like it only has two states: completely up or all the way down.

A similar process happens with people who skip micro-habits and jump straight to starting huge new macro-habits. Some common examples include when people suddenly go on an extreme crash diet, or invest in get-rich-quick schemes, or after a year of not exercising at all suddenly start going to the gym for 2 hours per day every day. It's usually worse than doing nothing.

Trust me; I've seen the gym on New Years Day. :shock:

Attempting to jump up the staircase after years of laying down on the ground is an easy way to fall down the stairs and make your starting position even worse (i.e. lower).

For example, 99.99% of the time, a person is better off not dieting at all than crash dieting.

It's way more effective to make small permanent lifestyle changes, rather than huge drastic ones that thus almost certainly don't last. In fact, the hugeness and drasticness of a huge drastic abrupt change is precisely what makes it tend to be so counterproductive. Extremeness begets inconsistency, and inconsistency begets extremeness. It's a roller-coaster-like cycle of abuse, particularly self-abuse. The absurd ups cause the equally extreme downs and vice versa. When you are trapped in such a cycle, you don't make progress, despite the exhaustingness, and really in part precisely because of the exhaustingness.

I use to wrestle in high school. In wrestling (and many martial arts), if you want get your opponent to go one way, you start by pushing him in the exact opposite way. You end up using his own force against him. Crash dieters and get-rich-quick-schemers end up having their own force used against them. They glorify trying over actually doing, like a teary-eyed adulterer saying they try really really hard to not cheat. Maybe they even grunt and groan while doing all that "trying". That's the endless cycle of a trier: exhausting and destructive, as if it was work, but no progress, just a cyclical trap. In contrast, using the power of micro-habits is a way to not need any willpower. You can instead throw your figurative opponent across the room to an easy defeat with the slightest flick of your wrist. That is grace in a nutshell. It's wu wei. It's effortless action. It's to do without trying. It's to do a lot and achieving incredible results not only without trying but precisely thanks to not trying.

To get to the top of the staircase most surely, go so slowly that you find yourself actually using your willpower to stop yourself from going faster. The only time you want to be using any significant willpower is to push yourself in the opposite direction of your goal.

In that way, you not only use much less of your precious little willpower but actually you use negative willpower, meaning the little bit of willpower you use is to actually push in the opposite direction to thereby trick your figurative opponent to help you so you can use his own force against him.

For example, if you want to build a habit of flossing your teeth every night, start by flossing just one tooth every night. Keep at that pace until you find yourself using a little bit of willpower to fight the urge to floss a second tooth. Then, keep going at the only-one-tooth-per-night rate for at least a few days longer. Make it so that if and when you cave to temptation, you are caving to the temptation to floss a second tooth instead of the temptation to floss no teeth. That is using your opponent's force against him. Then rinse and repeat: Do the same thing with the third tooth and forth tooth. Keep using your opponent's force against him. Then, from the perspective of onlookers on the outside, it will seem like you are magic and as if the tides and flow of the whole universe was conspiring to make you successful, with the way you achieve your goals with absolutely no effort or willpower. Other people will think you have infinite willpower because you never seem to run out and always have a full tank of willpower. They will think you are magic because of the way you achieve incredible success without trying at all.

Here are some short phrases and mantras you can use to remind yourself of these practices:

- Use micro-habits, not willpower.

- To make it to the top, go so slowly you find yourself actually using negative willpower.

- Go so slowly that the temptation you feel is to succeed faster, rather than to give up.

- Ride the tide of temptation (i.e. use your opponent's force against him) rather than using willpower.

- Use skill, not force.

- Work smart, not hard.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


use-habits-not-willpower.png



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Rahul Singh 29
Premium Member
Posts: 20
Joined: October 9th, 2023, 5:06 am

Re: To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him

Post by Rahul Singh 29 »

I totally agree with the idea that taking small, consistent steps, or micro-habits, can lead to significant long-term success without depleting one's willpower. The concept of "working smart, not hard" is particularly relevant in a world where many people struggle with willpower and burnout. Overall, it's a valuable perspective for anyone looking to make lasting changes in their life.
Seetha E
Premium Member
Posts: 22
Joined: August 3rd, 2023, 8:29 am

Re: To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him

Post by Seetha E »

Great practice !. Success is indeed a repeated sum of disciplined small efforts.
Marina Flisvou
Premium Member
Posts: 11
Joined: October 13th, 2023, 7:12 pm

Re: To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him

Post by Marina Flisvou »

Using small habits instead of force is smart. Trying to change too fast can fail, but slow, steady steps work better. The key is to work smart, not just hard. It's better to take your time and make lasting changes than to rush and give up.
Seetha E
Premium Member
Posts: 22
Joined: August 3rd, 2023, 8:29 am

Re: To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him

Post by Seetha E »

Seetha E wrote: October 18th, 2023, 11:56 am Great practice !. Success is indeed a sum of disciplined and repeated small efforts.
Mara Valentina
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: November 22nd, 2023, 7:00 am

Re: To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him

Post by Mara Valentina »

By channeling our opponent's force, we can turn challenges into opportunities for growth and progress. As Kobe Bryant would say "every challenges is an opportunity."
Okoth Omondi
Premium Member
Posts: 14
Joined: Yesterday, 6:58 am

Re: To achieve your goals, avoid using willpower. In fact, use negative willpower. Use your opponent's force against him

Post by Okoth Omondi »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: October 17th, 2023, 5:35 pm If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.


A crucial key in my free mentoring program and my general system for achieving incredible success is this: utilizing the incredible power of micro-habits.

It is done, in large part, by purposefully and intentionally avoiding creating new macro-habits, meaning avoiding massive abrupt uses of your precious limited willpower.

My system entails you being extremely stingy with your willpower, and then, even when you do use it, you only slowly use it with great hesitation and tentativeness.

In analogy, if you rush through switching gears or attempt to accelerate too quickly in a car, especially one with manual transmission and especially if you aren't yet an experienced expert in such aggressive driving, you can easily stall or even do damage to the car and break it. Don't treat the gas pedal like it only has two states: completely up or all the way down.

A similar process happens with people who skip micro-habits and jump straight to starting huge new macro-habits. Some common examples include when people suddenly go on an extreme crash diet, or invest in get-rich-quick schemes, or after a year of not exercising at all suddenly start going to the gym for 2 hours per day every day. It's usually worse than doing nothing.

Trust me; I've seen the gym on New Years Day. :shock:

Attempting to jump up the staircase after years of laying down on the ground is an easy way to fall down the stairs and make your starting position even worse (i.e. lower).

For example, 99.99% of the time, a person is better off not dieting at all than crash dieting.

It's way more effective to make small permanent lifestyle changes, rather than huge drastic ones that thus almost certainly don't last. In fact, the hugeness and drasticness of a huge drastic abrupt change is precisely what makes it tend to be so counterproductive. Extremeness begets inconsistency, and inconsistency begets extremeness. It's a roller-coaster-like cycle of abuse, particularly self-abuse. The absurd ups cause the equally extreme downs and vice versa. When you are trapped in such a cycle, you don't make progress, despite the exhaustingness, and really in part precisely because of the exhaustingness.

I use to wrestle in high school. In wrestling (and many martial arts), if you want get your opponent to go one way, you start by pushing him in the exact opposite way. You end up using his own force against him. Crash dieters and get-rich-quick-schemers end up having their own force used against them. They glorify trying over actually doing, like a teary-eyed adulterer saying they try really really hard to not cheat. Maybe they even grunt and groan while doing all that "trying". That's the endless cycle of a trier: exhausting and destructive, as if it was work, but no progress, just a cyclical trap. In contrast, using the power of micro-habits is a way to not need any willpower. You can instead throw your figurative opponent across the room to an easy defeat with the slightest flick of your wrist. That is grace in a nutshell. It's wu wei. It's effortless action. It's to do without trying. It's to do a lot and achieving incredible results not only without trying but precisely thanks to not trying.

To get to the top of the staircase most surely, go so slowly that you find yourself actually using your willpower to stop yourself from going faster. The only time you want to be using any significant willpower is to push yourself in the opposite direction of your goal.

In that way, you not only use much less of your precious little willpower but actually you use negative willpower, meaning the little bit of willpower you use is to actually push in the opposite direction to thereby trick your figurative opponent to help you so you can use his own force against him.

For example, if you want to build a habit of flossing your teeth every night, start by flossing just one tooth every night. Keep at that pace until you find yourself using a little bit of willpower to fight the urge to floss a second tooth. Then, keep going at the only-one-tooth-per-night rate for at least a few days longer. Make it so that if and when you cave to temptation, you are caving to the temptation to floss a second tooth instead of the temptation to floss no teeth. That is using your opponent's force against him. Then rinse and repeat: Do the same thing with the third tooth and forth tooth. Keep using your opponent's force against him. Then, from the perspective of onlookers on the outside, it will seem like you are magic and as if the tides and flow of the whole universe was conspiring to make you successful, with the way you achieve your goals with absolutely no effort or willpower. Other people will think you have infinite willpower because you never seem to run out and always have a full tank of willpower. They will think you are magic because of the way you achieve incredible success without trying at all.

Here are some short phrases and mantras you can use to remind yourself of these practices:

- Use micro-habits, not willpower.

- To make it to the top, go so slowly you find yourself actually using negative willpower.

- Go so slowly that the temptation you feel is to succeed faster, rather than to give up.

- Ride the tide of temptation (i.e. use your opponent's force against him) rather than using willpower.

- Use skill, not force.

- Work smart, not hard.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



use-habits-not-willpower.png




---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
To reach your goals, consider minimizing reliance on sheer willpower. Embrace the idea of using "negative willpower" by strategically utilizing external forces or opposition to your advantage. This approach involves transforming challenges into opportunities and redirecting resistance as a source of motivation.
Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes”

2023/2024 Philosophy Books of the Month

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise
by John K Danenbarger
January 2023

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul
by Mitzi Perdue
February 2023

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness
by Chet Shupe
March 2023

The Unfakeable Code®

The Unfakeable Code®
by Tony Jeton Selimi
April 2023

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021