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Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

A forum for old votes and nomination threads
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Hazletts
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Hazletts » December 20th, 2011, 6:22 am

I nominate 'A Theory of Justice' by John Rawls. Not read it yet but I am fascinated by the study of justice and its implications in the modern world.

Janis Schmidt
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Janis Schmidt » January 18th, 2012, 10:39 pm

I would like to nominate Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. In addition to being a great story, it is full of philosophical discussions market mentality vs. humanity. Set in the Great Depression, hundreds of thousands of people lost their homes, and were led to believe California was the promised land for work. Unlike our current situation, Steinbeck tells more how greed and profit is killing people.

Jerry
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Jerry » January 20th, 2012, 4:45 pm

I nominate Who's in Charge?: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga. It sure has made me re-think what is automatic or free will.
The Amazon description is; 'The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions. A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the brain has taken hold in recent years: Since physical laws govern the physical world and our own brains are part of that world, physical laws therefore govern our behavior and even our conscious selves. Free will is meaningless, goes the mantra; we live in a “determined” world. Not so, argues the renowned neuroscientist Michael S. Gazzaniga in this thoughtful, provocative book based on his Gifford Lectures——one of the foremost lecture series in the world dealing with religion, science, and philosophy. Who’s in Charge? proposes that the mind, which is somehow generated by the physical processes of the brain, “constrains” the brain just as cars are constrained by the traffic they create. Writing with what Steven Pinker has called “his trademark wit and lack of pretension,” Gazzaniga shows how determinism immeasurably weakens our views of human responsibility; it allows a murderer to argue, in effect, “It wasn’t me who did it——it was my brain.” Gazzaniga convincingly argues that even given the latest insights into the physical mechanisms of the mind, there is an undeniable human reality: We are responsible agents who should be held accountable for our actions, because responsibility is found in how people interact, not in brains. An extraordinary book that ranges across neuroscience, psychology, ethics, and the law with a light touch but profound implications, Who’s in Charge? is a lasting contribution from one of the leading thinkers of our time.'
"That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others." J.S.Mill

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Rebwit
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Rebwit » January 29th, 2012, 2:45 pm

Anthem by Ayn Rand. Her best work in my opinion, it will not waste your time with brown leafs and grey walls. Straight to the point. I wish every book was like this. ta

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Scott
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Scott » February 1st, 2012, 3:18 pm

I have posted the topic to discuss the February book of the month. And I have posted the topic to vote for the March book of the month. Please continue posting new nominations here.
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Mont
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Mont » February 5th, 2012, 8:25 pm

I would like to nominate God Is An Illusion: To Live Is To Experience, by Forest Grace. This thin book is definitely philosophical. It talks about each person being a duality (Yin and Yang). It also illustrates all forms of existence through some kind of interdependence of opposites. Furthermore, it puts God and gods in proper perpectives: illusions. Combining all of the above, plus some other similar concepts, it shows that one's ultimate purpose of life is to genuinely experience it. The biggest obstacle that can prevent us from having a "genuine" experience is human ego. And the book also shows us ways to control our egos. I found it very refreshing. Would like to know what you all think of it. By the way, don't get its Kindle version where the type setting is messy. The paperback is a lot better.

Invictus_88
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Invictus_88 » February 9th, 2012, 6:16 pm

Is there anywhere a list of all the past books of the month?

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dparrott
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by dparrott » February 23rd, 2012, 11:39 pm

I would like to discuss Robinson Crusoe.

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Misty
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Misty » March 1st, 2012, 5:55 am

I think a good book to discuss would be 'Impersonal Life' by Anonymous from 1940's but now 'The Impersonal Life'
by Joseph Benner (same book) which can be reviewed on amazon. (about why mankind is here in relationship to
God)
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MarkLint
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by MarkLint » March 14th, 2012, 2:54 pm

Not sure that it produced much benefit to either this site or the Partially Examined Life that we had some overlap re. our covering Foucault and that being the book of the month here for Feb., but for the record, in case we want to try to synchronize further, here are some upcoming episode topics over there that maybe folks would like to read about and discuss here:

1. Owen Flanagan's "The Bodhisattva's Brain"
2. Henri Bergson's "On Laughter"
3. Wittgenstein's "Philosophical Investigations"
4. Nozick's "Anarchy, State and Utopia"
5. "After Virtue" by Alisdair McIntyre

Steve3007
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Steve3007 » March 22nd, 2012, 6:44 pm

I nominate 1984 by George Orwell.

As well as the relevance to political philosophy, I think it is relevant to other areas. For example, discussions between O'Brien and Winston Smith in the Ministry of Love in which O'Brien asserts that the Party creates reality and defines history are interesting comments on the nature of reality. O'Brien's assertion that it's perfectly possible for a stable society to be based on fear and hatred is interesting with regard to the relativist/absolutist views of morality.

Schaps
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Schaps » March 30th, 2012, 2:49 am

An excellent book to consider is, The Sunflower - by Simon Wiesenthal. The nature and extent of forgiveness is explored and discussed by numerous "experts" in the field.

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dparrott
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by dparrott » March 30th, 2012, 9:00 am

Edward Livingston Seagull. It is one of the only books that I have read more than once and I think about it atleast once a day.

Sevillana123
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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by Sevillana123 » April 3rd, 2012, 11:06 am

I like "Thinking of answers:Questions in the Philosophy in Everyday Life" by A C Grayling.

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Re: Nominate books to be a philosophy book of the month

Post by heeltap » April 3rd, 2012, 3:13 pm

Consider Anthony Weston's _ A Rulebook for Arguments_ The people who want to do philosophy might pick up a few of the rules.

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