The Examined Life

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Sculptor1
Posts: 2529
Joined: May 16th, 2019, 5:35 am

Re: The Examined Life

Post by Sculptor1 » September 11th, 2020, 9:36 am

Angel Trismegistus wrote:
September 11th, 2020, 6:01 am
Sculptor1 wrote:
September 10th, 2020, 6:45 pm


A "cynicism" that has, since 1945, and for the first time in history saved Europe from the usual Bellum omnium contra omnes that has plagued it since the dawn of the concept of the nation state.
Thank F for that healthy cynicism.
Patriotism, as I'm sure you know, is older than nationalism, and has deeper roots in the human spirit.
B o l l o c k s.
😊
Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel.

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Angel Trismegistus
Posts: 462
Joined: July 25th, 2020, 1:19 pm
Favorite Philosopher: William James
Location: New York City

Re: The Examined Life

Post by Angel Trismegistus » September 11th, 2020, 11:30 am

Sculptor1 wrote:
September 11th, 2020, 9:36 am
Angel Trismegistus wrote:
September 11th, 2020, 6:01 am

Patriotism, as I'm sure you know, is older than nationalism, and has deeper roots in the human spirit.
B o l l o c k s.
😊
Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel.
A reply charged with the spirit of philosophical open-mindedness, to be sure.
Patriotism, feeling of attachment and commitment to a country, nation, or political community. Patriotism (love of country) and nationalism (loyalty to one’s nation) are often taken to be synonymous, yet patriotism has its origins some 2,000 years prior to the rise of nationalism in the 19th century.

Greek and especially Roman antiquity provide the roots for a political patriotism that conceives of loyalty to the patria as loyalty to a political conception of the republic. It is associated with the love of law and common liberty, the search for the common good, and the duty to behave justly toward one’s country. This classical Roman meaning of patria reemerges in the context of the Italian city republics of the 15th century. Here, patria stands for the common liberty of the city, which can only be safeguarded by the citizens’ civic spirit.
https://www.britannica.com/topic/patriotism-sociology
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