Personal Space; can we have it?

Use this forum to discuss the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
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Sushan
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Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by LuckyR »

Social media is well known to contribute to depressive thoughts. At first glance, you might expect folks to avoid it, however the source of the depressive thoughts are the feeling of missing out on something interesting, thus fueling the continuance of one's exposure to such a damaging pastime.
"As usual... it depends."
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

LuckyR wrote: April 10th, 2022, 3:27 am Social media is well known to contribute to depressive thoughts. At first glance, you might expect folks to avoid it, however the source of the depressive thoughts are the feeling of missing out on something interesting, thus fueling the continuance of one's exposure to such a damaging pastime.
Today's social media is made in a way to keep the users engaged in it continously. So the user will get targeted posts depending on what he/she is actually experiencing (the AI are well improved to do the task). So your social media platform will always mirror your thoughts and feelings.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Angelo Cannata »

I think that, if you realize that you are your personal space, then you will be interested in protecting, exploring and cultivating it.
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by stevie »

Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 12:57 am This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
There is no "personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.)". There are excitatory resting potentials and excitatory action potentials.
mankind ... must act and reason and believe; though they are not able, by their most diligent enquiry, to satisfy themselves concerning the foundation of these operations, or to remove the objections, which may be raised against them [Hume]
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by LuckyR »

Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 7:45 am
LuckyR wrote: April 10th, 2022, 3:27 am Social media is well known to contribute to depressive thoughts. At first glance, you might expect folks to avoid it, however the source of the depressive thoughts are the feeling of missing out on something interesting, thus fueling the continuance of one's exposure to such a damaging pastime.
Today's social media is made in a way to keep the users engaged in it continously. So the user will get targeted posts depending on what he/she is actually experiencing (the AI are well improved to do the task). So your social media platform will always mirror your thoughts and feelings.
...with a slant towards ever increasing novelty to keep the clicks (read: profits) coming in. Thus the mirror distorts the reality until eventually reality becomes distorted.
"As usual... it depends."
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Pattern-chaser »

Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 12:57 am This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
How practical? Almost everyone can find a calm and quiet space, big enough to sit down in, and relax. I think that's all that is needed.
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by JackDaydream »

Pattern-chaser wrote: April 11th, 2022, 12:46 pm
Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 12:57 am This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
How practical? Almost everyone can find a calm and quiet space, big enough to sit down in, and relax. I think that's all that is needed.
I am not sure that finding quiet personal space is so easy in a crowded and noisy world. Often, I do sit at the end of my gigantic bed in my room, where I am now, almost in a trance of thought. But, it's not always quiet because my flatmates listen to rap and I don't really like my room, and people seem to walk around the house so much during the night.

When I go out, taking my books, I find that if I go to a coffee shop I often end up with having to share a table with complete strangers. Even libraries can be extremely busy. Some people like parks as private thinking spaces but I find that I get miserable if I go to parks alone. As I a teenager I used to go wandering off into the wilderness to think. It can be good to walk around outside if the weather is nice enough, but as I live in London finding private space seems hard. It seems that everything is oriented towards families and groups. I do like to spend time with others but finding quiet corners is important and without media distractions, so I sometimes leave my phone at home.
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

Angelo Cannata wrote: April 10th, 2022, 5:15 pm I think that, if you realize that you are your personal space, then you will be interested in protecting, exploring and cultivating it.
If 'we are' our personal space then what we do throughout our lives are to maintain our personal space. I can agree with personal space and inner ppeace lying within one's self. But, I am sorry, I cannot understand we are being our personal space.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

stevie wrote: April 11th, 2022, 2:41 am
Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 12:57 am This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
There is no "personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.)". There are excitatory resting potentials and excitatory action potentials.
I think you are referring to neurology with action and resting potentials. If we try to explain this scientifically I think you are correct. But is it all about science? Don't we have anything that is either beyond science or not understandable by science when it comes to personal space and inner peace?
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Sushan
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

LuckyR wrote: April 11th, 2022, 3:21 am
Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 7:45 am
LuckyR wrote: April 10th, 2022, 3:27 am Social media is well known to contribute to depressive thoughts. At first glance, you might expect folks to avoid it, however the source of the depressive thoughts are the feeling of missing out on something interesting, thus fueling the continuance of one's exposure to such a damaging pastime.
Today's social media is made in a way to keep the users engaged in it continously. So the user will get targeted posts depending on what he/she is actually experiencing (the AI are well improved to do the task). So your social media platform will always mirror your thoughts and feelings.
...with a slant towards ever increasing novelty to keep the clicks (read: profits) coming in. Thus the mirror distorts the reality until eventually reality becomes distorted.
That is happening with the virtualization of everything. It started with video games, which allows the player to be someone else and perform actions that linger within your mind, but cannot perform in the actual world due to legal amd other boundaries. When people get addicted to this virtual world which is currently being offered by social media (latest step taken by facebook making a metaverse), some actually gets distorted by not being able to separate reality from virtual reality, while another group will resist to get out from the virtual reality willingly.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

Pattern-chaser wrote: April 11th, 2022, 12:46 pm
Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 12:57 am This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
How practical? Almost everyone can find a calm and quiet space, big enough to sit down in, and relax. I think that's all that is needed.
I don't think everyone are lucky enough to find such a physical place. Not everyone gets the chance to get away from all the huzzle and buzzle to experience such a calmness. But most importantly do you think the only necessity to experience peace is physical?
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sushan »

JackDaydream wrote: April 11th, 2022, 5:26 pm
Pattern-chaser wrote: April 11th, 2022, 12:46 pm
Sushan wrote: April 10th, 2022, 12:57 am This topic is about the April 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, 2X2 on the Ark: Five Secrets of a Great Relationship by Mary J Giuffra, PhD



The author speaks about the importance of personal space and how it can be used to calm one's self and solve problems.
Transcendentalists such as Thoreau urge us to explore our own Walden Ponds and feel the spaciousness and peace surrounding and within us. Yoga asanas are conducted in quiet, darkened rooms to encourage a connection with inner stillness and inner space. Tai chi enthusiasts become masters in the use of space. Mindfulness meditation practices are commonly presented in health settings to quiet mental turmoil and allow contact with inner stillness and spaciousness in order to facilitate healing.
(Location 171 - Kindle version)

How practical is it to experience this personal space (or inner peace or inner stillness, etc.) in today's interconnected world? More importantly is it practical to have a very own personal space when you are in a relationship, though we might always feel the need for it?
How practical? Almost everyone can find a calm and quiet space, big enough to sit down in, and relax. I think that's all that is needed.
I am not sure that finding quiet personal space is so easy in a crowded and noisy world. Often, I do sit at the end of my gigantic bed in my room, where I am now, almost in a trance of thought. But, it's not always quiet because my flatmates listen to rap and I don't really like my room, and people seem to walk around the house so much during the night.

When I go out, taking my books, I find that if I go to a coffee shop I often end up with having to share a table with complete strangers. Even libraries can be extremely busy. Some people like parks as private thinking spaces but I find that I get miserable if I go to parks alone. As I a teenager I used to go wandering off into the wilderness to think. It can be good to walk around outside if the weather is nice enough, but as I live in London finding private space seems hard. It seems that everything is oriented towards families and groups. I do like to spend time with others but finding quiet corners is important and without media distractions, so I sometimes leave my phone at home.
I really agree with your last sentence. What you have mentioned above that are also true. There are problems with each and every place that we think to get some peace. If we go to a faraway jungle shrine atleast a mosquito may break the tranquility. But the biggest obstacle to gain inner peace is the mobile phone. With our nature of work we cannot totally remove it. But it can become nuisance when we try to be alone and have some personal time.
“There is only one thing a philosopher can be relied upon to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers”

– William James
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Angelo Cannata »

Sushan wrote: April 12th, 2022, 4:06 am
Angelo Cannata wrote: April 10th, 2022, 5:15 pm I think that, if you realize that you are your personal space, then you will be interested in protecting, exploring and cultivating it.
If 'we are' our personal space then what we do throughout our lives are to maintain our personal space. I can agree with personal space and inner ppeace lying within one's self. But, I am sorry, I cannot understand we are being our personal space.
If your personal space is reduced to zero, then you have no time to think, no way to act, no way to be aware of anything, you are just a dead object. If you react to this, this happens because there is still a space were your ability to react and to protect yourself has still been preserved. That minimum original space is just you. You cannot protect your space if there isn't already an amount of space were you exist, that coincides with you.
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Re: Personal Space; can we have it?

Post by Sy Borg »

The Sweet once sang that love is like oxygen. For me, personal space is like oxygen.

This is how I see love: I was at a party about 40 years ago. It was late, I was wasted, the house was dimly lit, and I was looking for something to eat. There was a delectable-looking wedge on a plate, untouched. Bingo! Chocolate cake! I took a bite. It turned out to be a chunk of liverwurst. At first I thought the cake must have decomposed into a foul, fungal mass until the penny dropped. Love is liverwurst pretending to be chocolate cake.

Anecdotes aside, personal space will become ever more difficult to achieve. Personal space is easier to find in Dakota than Delhi.
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