Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by mrlefty0706 »

I do not understand your response that you are un-motivated especially when it comes to your family. You will do whatever you can to help your two children be successful in life. If you are unmotivated then you would just let them grow up without any parental guideance. Can you explain this to me?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: July 10th, 2023, 2:17 pm Different people tend to mean different things by the word motivate, and, by extension, the word motive.

Word for word, two people might both seem to ask the same exact question, such as "What was the murderer's motive?"

Or, they might ask, "What motivated the murderer?" Or, "What motivated the alcoholic to drink?" Or, "What motivated the adulterer to have the affair?"

Of all those people together, one might collectively ask, What were their shared motives?

However, despite two speakers' words being the same, the meaning might be very different between two different speakers who ask those questions.

To really answer your question accurately, let me first ask you, how do you define the word 'motivate'? In other words, what do you mean by the word 'motivate' when you use it?

In any case, let me say that I hold my inner peace (a.k.a. consistent true happiness) as very valuable to me and as an absolute top priority. As such, I tend to do my best to avoid what most people would call 'motivation'. Because I value my inner peace (a.k.a. happiness) so deeply, I work hard to be un-motivated and to have relatively little desire, for a human, that is.

Many philosophies and religious traditions have taught that desire is the root of all suffering.

In my book, I state a similar but slightly different premise: I say desire is suffering. In the lingo of my book, they are two words for the same thing.

More roughly speaking, one could say I do my best to desire what I have and only what I have. But, of course, the more common word for that is gratitude rather than desire.

For example, I do my best to not covet my neighbor's wife; that is, of course, assuming she isn't already in my bed. :lol:

An elaboration on how such intentional de-motivation can play out more practically is in the chapter of my book titled, "Do Less, Better".

mrlefty0706 wrote: February 13th, 2024, 8:45 pm I do not understand your response that you are un-motivated especially when it comes to your family. You will do whatever you can to help your two children be successful in life. If you are unmotivated then you would just let them grow up without any parental guideance. Can you explain this to me?

Hi, mrlefty0706,

Thank you for your question! :)

First, I would suggest you re-read the very first sentence in my post above to which you are replying and asking about.

That very first sentence was this: "Different people tend to mean different things by the word motivate, and, by extension, the word motive."

How do you define the word 'motive'? How do you define the word 'motivate'?

Those aren't rhetorical questions. I am actually asking you. It will be effectively impossible to communicate with you about this and understand each other if I don't know what you mean by the equivocal term and how it differs from what I mean by it.

Regardless, moving forward a bit, I didn't say I am un-motivated. If you read the post carefully above, what I said is that I do my best to be as un-motivated (i.e. lacking desire for things I don't already have) as humanly possible.

Those last three words ("as humanly possible") are a key qualifier.

Scott/Eckhart is still a human. He is a vegetation, but his mouth still waters at the smell or sight of tasty meat.

"Motivation" as I typically use the word refers roughly to the opposite of gratitude. Gratitude is desiring what you already have, and thus more accurately of not desiring at all. Motivation is a state of desiring what you don't have.

Instead of constantly thinking that what I have in my present is not good enough by desiring ever-more, I instead do my best to have no desire for anything that I don't already have and instead practice gratitude and presence.

To take your example with the kids, perhaps it's true that if I was completely un-motivated (a.k.a. completely without desire) to a totally impossible inhuman degree, then I would likely neither feed/raise my kids nor feed myself. My kids would go unraised (by me, instead being raised by their mom solely) and I would die of dehydration within days. This reminds me of this quote from a lecture by Alan Watts:

"They say in India of a jivanmukta (a man who is liberated in this world) that he has to cultivate a few mild bad habits in order to stay in the body. Because if he were absolutely perfect he would disappear from manifestation. And so the great yogi—maybe he smokes a cigarette, or has a bad temper occasionally: something that keeps him human. And that little thing is very important. It’s like the salt in a stew. It grounds him. Well, this is another way of saying that even a very great sage, a great Buddha, will have in him a touch of regret that life is fleeting, because if he doesn’t have that touch of regret, he’s not human and he’s incapable of compassion towards people."


Imagine a scale of 0 - 100, where 0 is a state of absolute desirelessness (a.k.a. un-motivation) and of maximum gratitude and presence, and 100 is a state of maximum desire/motivation and thus a utterance of gratitude and presence. In other words, 0 is state of being infinitely happy with you have in your present such that you don't at all have any desire for anything more, and 100 is a state where you are maximally unhappy with what you have in your present and totally and utterly absorbed in wanting more.

I am saying that I am to get as close to 0 as humanly possible, with the knowledge that is not going to get me to 0. Maybe the closet to 0 a human can get is 5. The fact that I wrote "as much as humanly possible" in the post to which you replied is key.

In practical terms, what does that all mean, one might ask. You can take the example of my kids again. For a human, I am very far away from being helicopter parent. The average parent is much closer to being a helicopter parent and/or control freak than I am.

In contrast, I live in such a way that if one of my kids got hit by car tomorrow and died, I wouldn't then be regretfully thinking, "I wish I had hugged him tighter and longer yesterday, instead of scolding him and making him feeling naught and bad to raise him to be an adult." No, instead I hug them tighter and longer today, and don't squander my time with them by setting the harmful example of being someone who treats the future as a false idol, a topic my book discusses in great detail. Many parents are so obsessed with how they want their kids to turn out one day in the future at some arbitrary adult age that's of no more real importance than the age they are now that those parents squander their time with their kids now by being a control freak towards them and unwittingly teaching their kids their own ungrateful future-obsessed control-freak habits instead of teaching their kids--via their example as a role model--the value of presence, gratitude, inner peace, and radical acceptance.

Kids learn by example. If you smack your kid every time he heats peanut butter, you don't teach him to not eat peanut butter; you teach him to smack people. You teach him to use aggression and bullying to get his way.

I am proud to be far less motivated as a parent than helicopter parents and control freak parents. I am proud to be far less motivated than abusive parents, many of whom surely believe they are doing what's in their child's best interests in terms of the the future version of that child (i.e. engaging in what my book calls toxic codependency with your selves over time, except using their child's future self as the false idol instead of the human in the mirror).

In contrast, I teach my kids the value of minimizing desire (a.k.a. motivation) and of instead happily engaging in loving presence, acceptance, and gratitude by being a role model who embodies those traits for them.

There is an important chapter in my book titled, "Do Less, Better". I teach my kids that by being a role model, meaning by doing less myself.

In contrast, restless doing-addicts teach their kids to be restless doing-addicts. Control freaks teach their kids to be control freaks. Shoulders teach their kids to miserably should on themselves and others. I never tell my kids they "should" do or be anything, not now nor later, and so they do grow up they won't have a nasty critical voice in their voice in their constantly shoulding on them and making them feel like they aren't good enough. How we parents talk to them know is generally how they will talk to themselves in their own head for the rest of their lives.

The same way we pass on genetic traits to our biological children, we pass on our memetic traits to the children for whom we are role models. In the long run, they don't do as we say; they do as we do.

So, especially for the sake of my kids, and especially for when they are watching, I do my absolute best to be as un-motivated (a.k.a. un-desiring of that which I don't have) as humanly possible, to not covet and such, and instead as much as humanly possible engage in gratitude and gracious radical acceptance with deep consistent spiritual fulfillment and invincible free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness).

For me, rebelliousness and free-spiritedness (a.k.a. self-discipline) go hand-in-hand, but perhaps for my kids they won't need as much cycle-breaking rebellion to be free and so utterly unlike so many generations before us, with their obsessive doing, miserable motivation, and hungry spiritual starvation--always wanting more, never satisfied, always feeling that they and the world are not good enough.

I show them by example as a role model what it means to practice presence and be happily fulfilled and appreciative, rather than future-obsessed and/or longing/desiring/wanting more (a.k.a. being motivated).

Motivation as I use the term is generally just a symptom of unhappiness, misery, and a lack of grateful free-spirited inner peace. In other words, motivation is just a symptom of being unfulfilled, particularly in the sense of being spiritually unfulfilled.

So I do my best to be a role model who shows my kids via my example what it means to be spiritually fulfilled and thus un-desiring/unmotivated. I show them via example how to be happy, truly happy, in the sense of having free-spirited inner peace and practicing gracious grateful presence.





With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott


Break the cycle. Be a rebellious free spirit.
Break the cycle. Be a rebellious free spirit.



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
mrlefty0706
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by mrlefty0706 »

Hi Eckhart, thank you for your very thorough reply.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Lorna Philip Enslin »

Hi Scott,
I recall that in one of my posts I mentioned my current circumstances of being responsible for my 13 yr old grandson since his Father passed last year. My daughter (his mother) has been out of rehab for 6 months and is slowly getting her life together but having difficulty finding work as a carer. So, the onus is on me to provide as my husband is 84 and retired.

My grandson requires remedial teaching which is beyond our financial capabilities at present. However, I have hatched a plan to overcome this and I’m currently half way through a TEFL course (teaching the english language to foreign students) which I’m surprisingly enjoying. I say surprisingly because its 55 yrs ago that I last saw a grammar paper, which just goes to show, you’re never too old to learn!

I’m very grateful that I discovered this platform and expect to be working flat out very soon.🙏🏻 My reviews for OBC will continue: it gives vent to my creativity and I’m passionate about reading plus they pay me for writing reviews and every little bit helps.

This post is merely to point out that irrespective of how deep in the morass you are financially, you’re never too old to up skill, relearn, or find a job and let us never forget those who’s life circumstances are very much worse than ours and would give everything for just one of our opportunities. I’m very grateful for all that I have and pray that I can continue in good health to work, protect and provide for my precious little man.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Lorna Philip Enslin wrote: February 16th, 2024, 6:17 am Hi Scott,
I recall that in one of my posts I mentioned my current circumstances of being responsible for my 13 yr old grandson since his Father passed last year. My daughter (his mother) has been out of rehab for 6 months and is slowly getting her life together but having difficulty finding work as a carer. So, the onus is on me to provide as my husband is 84 and retired.

My grandson requires remedial teaching which is beyond our financial capabilities at present. However, I have hatched a plan to overcome this and I’m currently half way through a TEFL course (teaching the english language to foreign students) which I’m surprisingly enjoying. I say surprisingly because its 55 yrs ago that I last saw a grammar paper, which just goes to show, you’re never too old to learn!

I’m very grateful that I discovered this platform and expect to be working flat out very soon.🙏🏻 My reviews for OBC will continue: it gives vent to my creativity and I’m passionate about reading plus they pay me for writing reviews and every little bit helps.

This post is merely to point out that irrespective of how deep in the morass you are financially, you’re never too old to up skill, relearn, or find a job and let us never forget those who’s life circumstances are very much worse than ours and would give everything for just one of our opportunities. I’m very grateful for all that I have and pray that I can continue in good health to work, protect and provide for my precious little man.
Hi, Lorna Philip Enslin,

Yes, I completely agree: you’re never too old to up skill, relearn, or find a job. It's also a great habit to regularly think about the fact that there are many people out there who wish they had it as good as you have it and wish for what you have.

It's wonderful what you are doing for your grandson. You seem like a great grandmother.



With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Lorna Philip Enslin
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Lorna Philip Enslin »

Hi Scott,
Thank you: we’re mum’s and dad’s forever and even when adult kids return home with grandkids, we embrace them because we know how challenging life can be. I’m privileged to have been given a precious life to nurture at this advanced age: my only wish is to ensure that he grows up to be a kind, caring and loving man: much like yourself.

Sincerely,

Lorna
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Adam Bryce Stern »

Hi Scott, I came across one of your posts about how "happiness leads to external success". I'd love to hear your opinion on things you consider internal success as well. I do believe money, fame and the rest of it classifies as external. And self fulfilment seems like the only internal success, I can think of.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Adam Bryce Stern wrote: February 17th, 2024, 2:21 am Hi Scott, I came across one of your posts about how "happiness leads to external success". I'd love to hear your opinion on things you consider internal success as well. I do believe money, fame and the rest of it classifies as external. And self fulfilment seems like the only internal success, I can think of.
Hi, Adam Bryce Stern,

Thank you for your question!

As I use the terms, internal success (or "true success") is unavoidable. It's a nearly tautological truth, one that would probably seem meaningless and fully tautological to a reasonable philosophical zombie (i.e. a human lacking true consciousness, a.k.a. a human without a spirit). In other words, failure is an illusion, and by extension spiritual slavery is always a type of or symptom of some kind of illusion or dishonesty especially in the sense of dishonest self-delusion. Granted, as my book explains in detail, illusions can be self-fulfilling and thus be granted a sort of indirect relative reality. Imaginary roadblocks are just as effective as real ones, and fictional nightmares torment you just the same despite their fictionality and the fact that you actually control them.

As I typically use the terms, the phrase "external success" is a phrase I use mainly to refer to superficial things that are commonly associated with success, or commonly seen as symptoms of success, or things that your present self would tend to think your future self (or kids or great grandkids) would see as a welcomed gift. Those are things like money, wealth, good reputation, good looks, a nice house with a working toilet, and a comfortable bed. Incidentally, most humans throughout most of history did not have a working toilet, so if such things and creature comforts were actually what defined true success (they aren't) then the line between successful people and unsuccesful people would be most correlated with a point in the timeline of human history, such as the invention of the toilet and indoor plumbing.

Another probably much clearer way to look at it is in terms of what my book calls "The Two Yous".

"Internal Success" is about what my book calls the real you, and roughly speaking about what the real you 'wants', or really the lack of wanting by it, and more importantly (as my book explains in detail) about how that transcends desire and temptation and entails an infinite source of infinite unwavering spiritual fulfillment and free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness), all achievable without any effort at all, costing zero dollars to achieve and takings zero seconds to achieve. It's so infinitely easy to achieve, that even calling it an achievement or calling it easy is a bit of misnomer. Calling it easy is like saying a bald man's hair is short.

In contrast, "external success" is about the body and ego, and what the body and ego want, such as bodily comfort, sensual pleasure, and things like money, drugs, social attention, sex, and beer, or whatever any given body craves. There is nothing wrong with those things, but they won't give you true happiness. Happiness leads to you having more of those things, not vice versa. That's for many reasons but a big one is that, when you are spiritually fulfilled and truly happy, you don't chase those kinds of things away with desperate miserable clinginess and a miserable impoverishing scarcity mindset, but rather attract them with your happiness, confidence, gracefulness, and happily appreciative abundance mindset.

Here are two key quotes from my book:


when-it-comes-to-your-choices-there-is-no-try.jpg
Failure is an illusion. Internal Success (a.k.a. true success) is unavoidable. Everyone and everything is a success. You are always successful, because, when it comes to your choices, you always successfully get exactly what you choose.
Failure is an illusion. Internal Success (a.k.a. true success) is unavoidable. Everyone and everything is a success. You are always successful, because, when it comes to your choices, you always successfully get exactly what you choose.





With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Adam Bryce Stern
Premium Member
Posts: 13
Joined: February 4th, 2024, 1:52 am

Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Adam Bryce Stern »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: February 18th, 2024, 2:19 pm If you haven't already, you can sign up to be personally mentored by Scott "Eckhart Aurelius" Hughes at this link.

Adam Bryce Stern wrote: February 17th, 2024, 2:21 am Hi Scott, I came across one of your posts about how "happiness leads to external success". I'd love to hear your opinion on things you consider internal success as well. I do believe money, fame and the rest of it classifies as external. And self fulfilment seems like the only internal success, I can think of.
Hi, Adam Bryce Stern,

Thank you for your question!

As I use the terms, internal success (or "true success") is unavoidable. It's a nearly tautological truth, one that would probably seem meaningless and fully tautological to a reasonable philosophical zombie (i.e. a human lacking true consciousness, a.k.a. a human without a spirit). In other words, failure is an illusion, and by extension spiritual slavery is always a type of or symptom of some kind of illusion or dishonesty especially in the sense of dishonest self-delusion. Granted, as my book explains in detail, illusions can be self-fulfilling and thus be granted a sort of indirect relative reality. Imaginary roadblocks are just as effective as real ones, and fictional nightmares torment you just the same despite their fictionality and the fact that you actually control them.

As I typically use the terms, the phrase "external success" is a phrase I use mainly to refer to superficial things that are commonly associated with success, or commonly seen as symptoms of success, or things that your present self would tend to think your future self (or kids or great grandkids) would see as a welcomed gift. Those are things like money, wealth, good reputation, good looks, a nice house with a working toilet, and a comfortable bed. Incidentally, most humans throughout most of history did not have a working toilet, so if such things and creature comforts were actually what defined true success (they aren't) then the line between successful people and unsuccesful people would be most correlated with a point in the timeline of human history, such as the invention of the toilet and indoor plumbing.

Another probably much clearer way to look at it is in terms of what my book calls "The Two Yous".

"Internal Success" is about what my book calls the real you, and roughly speaking about what the real you 'wants', or really the lack of wanting by it, and more importantly (as my book explains in detail) about how that transcends desire and temptation and entails an infinite source of infinite unwavering spiritual fulfillment and free-spirited inner peace (a.k.a. true happiness), all achievable without any effort at all, costing zero dollars to achieve and takings zero seconds to achieve. It's so infinitely easy to achieve, that even calling it an achievement or calling it easy is a bit of misnomer. Calling it easy is like saying a bald man's hair is short.

In contrast, "external success" is about the body and ego, and what the body and ego want, such as bodily comfort, sensual pleasure, and things like money, drugs, social attention, sex, and beer, or whatever any given body craves. There is nothing wrong with those things, but they won't give you true happiness. Happiness leads to you having more of those things, not vice versa. That's for many reasons but a big one is that, when you are spiritually fulfilled and truly happy, you don't chase those kinds of things away with desperate miserable clinginess and a miserable impoverishing scarcity mindset, but rather attract them with your happiness, confidence, gracefulness, and happily appreciative abundance mindset.

Here are two key quotes from my book:



when-it-comes-to-your-choices-there-is-no-try.jpg


you-always-get-exactly-what-you-want.png






With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott



---
In addition to having authored his book, In It Together, Eckhart Aurelius Hughes (a.k.a. Scott) runs a mentoring program, with a free option, that guarantees success. Success is guaranteed for anyone who follows the program.

Wow, thank you for your reply, that was extremely detailed and helpful.
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Henry Daniel 2 »

What is your favorite book in this forum? Have you read all the books in this forum? How many children do you have?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Henry Daniel 2 wrote: March 1st, 2024, 6:14 pm What is your favorite book in this forum? Have you read all the books in this forum? How many children do you have?
Hi, Henry Daniel 2,

I don't know what you mean by "in this forum" exactly. Can you explain in more detail what you mean by the phrase "in this forum"?
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango »

Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: November 1st, 2022, 5:09 pm For those who don't know, I am Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

Post any questions you have for me as a reply to this topic, and I will do my best answer.

It can be a question about anything. It can be about me, about the book, or about anything else! :D




ask-me-anything.jpg
How far would you go to save a person whom you deem to be a lost soul with no sense of direction?
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango wrote: March 17th, 2024, 8:43 am
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes wrote: November 1st, 2022, 5:09 pm For those who don't know, I am Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

Post any questions you have for me as a reply to this topic, and I will do my best answer.

It can be a question about anything. It can be about me, about the book, or about anything else! :D




ask-me-anything.jpg
How far would you go to save a person whom you deem to be a lost soul with no sense of direction?
Hi, Risper Ouma Lisa Anyango,

Thank you for your question! :)

Before I answer, can you define and explain what you mean by "save" in this context? What does it mean to save a person? Have you ever saved a person? If so, can you describe the latest time you successfully saved a person in detail?

Can you also explain what you mean by "lost soul"? As I use the terms, what does it mean for someone to be a lost soul?

I hope you don't mind the questions. I just want to be sure to understand your question, so I can answer accurate. :)


With love,
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
a.k.a. Scott
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
Austin Rhodes
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Austin Rhodes »

I am glad I get to post. I would love to know if you have an upcoming book you plan on releasing soon.
Gerry Steen
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Re: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes AMA (Ask Me Anything)

Post by Gerry Steen »

Hi, Scott. How did you come up with the name Eckhart Aurelius Hughes as your pseudo-name?
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by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021