There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neither.

Discuss the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes.

To post in this forum, you must buy and read the book. After buying the book, please upload a screenshot of your receipt or proof or purchase via OnlineBookClub. Once the moderators approve your purchase at OnlineBookClub, you will then also automatically be given access to post in this forum.
Forum rules
This forum is for discussing the book In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All. Anyone can view the forum and read the post, but only people who purchased the book can post in the forum.

If your purchase has not already been verified (i.e. if you don't already have access to post in this forum), then please upload a screenshot of your receipt or proof or purchase via OnlineBookClub. Once the moderators approve your purchase at OnlineBookClub, you will then also automatically be given access to post in this forum.
Post Reply
User avatar
Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
The admin formerly known as Scott
Posts: 5896
Joined: January 20th, 2007, 6:24 pm
Favorite Philosopher: Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
Contact:

There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neither.

Post by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes »

This is a discussion forum topic for the November 2022 Philosophy Book of the Month, In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All.



One does not find true happiness (a.k.a. inner peace) through externals such as money, fame, physical health, good looks, or good reputation. A similar but commonly overlooked external is the desire to make others happy and save others spiritually or otherwise. Sometimes it's even a desire to save the whole world. Where one person says, "I will finally be truly happy if I make a million dollars," another says, "I will finally be truly happy once I first make everyone else in the world happy." Both are equally foolish and wrong. Give an ungrateful person more of what they allegedly want, and you just make them more ungrateful. There is nothing wrong with desire, be it desire for money or desire to be a savior, just as there is nothing wrong with fear or hunger. Feelings cannot be wrong. What's wrong is the belief that fulfilling desires can or will make you happy. As my book teaches in detail, fulfillment causes desire to be replaced, not eliminated. There will always be more externals to chase, or figuratively speaking greener grass to chase in an endless cycle of greener-grass-chasing. Being a rebellious free-spirit with inner peace is, in part, about breaking that cycle, or at least transcending it to acceptingly notice its endlessness with an accepting spiritual smile. True happiness (i.e. inner peace) isn't found by fulfilling all your desires and eliminating all your fears and discomfort because that is impossible and silly. One with true happiness (i.e. inner peace) has it even while feeling desire, fear, hunger, pain, and discomfort, which are things that generally every single human feels every single day.

Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neither. You cannot fill other people's cups with your empty one. But you sure can make an effective scapegoat out of the futile attempt to do it. If you falsely treat true happiness as a zero-sum game you can scapegoat everyone else's unhappiness as the reason for your own unhappiness. In your futile attempts to fill other people's cups with your empty one, you can say, "my cup is empty because I am so generous and because everyone else is so needy and greedy."

Unhappy people tend to look for excuses and scapegoats for their unhappiness. They will often say something like, "I am unhappy because of X!" But, really, they would be unhappy even if X happened to not be the case, and perhaps they even purposely define X such that the alleged condition they set for their happiness is purposely impossible or unrealistic. In such cases, they might as well say, "I'd be happy if 2 + 2 equaled 5, but it doesn't so I'm not, and so I hate the world, and I hate life."

Many people claim to themselves and/or to others that they are trying to "save the world" and that they will be happy only if and when the whole outer world is saved. Thus, they thereby get to use the allegedly unsaved world as the scapegoat they so desperately want to have and cling to. Scapegoats are a common comfort to comfort addicts. If you would rather indulge in tempting comforts than have true happiness of free-spirited inner peace, I suggest you go find yourself some comforting scapegoats. They are easy to find because you make them up yourself.

In many ways, we always get what we want.

In many ways, we only and always see only what we want to see.

That's for many reasons, but one is that perception is at least mostly--if not entirely--a matter of projection. In other words, the outer world is much more of a mirror than we often realize.

Years ago, I found an infinite source of happiness, salvation, and invincible graceful inner peace.

In this human form, my absolute number one priority is to maintain and enjoy that wonderful free-spirited inner peace, every day until I die.

That takes priority, but, I am also happily eager to share it, just not at the sacrifice of it.

I am happily eager to share this wonderful thing with you and everyone primarily because of two reasons: First, I love you and everyone. Second, it's infinite. There's more than enough to go around. All our cups can be 100% filled. True happiness is not a zero-sum game. It's a game of dividing up something that's infinite. True happiness comes from an infinite source: No matter how much you take nor how much you throw back, my happiness remains fully intact, my cup still filled to the brim, infinitely overflowing. In other words, we can both be truly happy, meaning both have invincible graceful inner peace, day in and day out for the rest of our lives. In other words, we can both be saved.

But, if you are unhappy, I'll still be happy.

If you don't choose to have and enjoy wonderful invincible free-spirited inner peace, I'll still have it, and I'll still get to enjoy it.

If you choose to remain unsaved, I'll still be saved.

I love you, but my happiness (i.e. inner peace) does not depend on you.




---
My book, "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggling Uniting Us All", is available for purchase from all major book retailers in both ebook and hardcover format.

View on Barnes and Noble | View on Amazon | View on Books-A-Million | View on Bookshelves


Image
My entire political philosophy summed up in one tweet.

"The mind is a wonderful servant but a terrible master."

I believe spiritual freedom (a.k.a. self-discipline) manifests as bravery, confidence, grace, honesty, love, and inner peace.
User avatar
Surabhi Rani
Premium Member
Posts: 120
Joined: November 3rd, 2022, 3:21 am

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Surabhi Rani »

I enjoyed reading about your experience of discovering an infinite source of happiness, salvation, an invincible graceful inner peace and that you are happily eager to share it, Sir! I do know that there is an infinite source of energy within us and that we can find access to it at the right time in our lives. Also, I truly appreciate your message for all of us, 'We can both be truly happy, meaning both have invincible graceful inner peace, day in and day out for the rest of our lives.'
Sondang Hotmauli
Premium Member
Posts: 13
Joined: June 29th, 2023, 6:40 am

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Sondang Hotmauli »

"In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes explores the pursuit of true happiness and inner peace. The book challenges the notion that external factors such as money, fame, or the desire to save the world can bring genuine fulfillment. Hughes argues that constantly chasing external sources of happiness is futile, as there will always be more to chase in an endless cycle. True happiness lies in accepting the inherent ups and downs of life and finding contentment within oneself. The author cautions against using the unhappiness of others as a scapegoat for personal discontent. Hughes adds that while one is eager to share their inner peace with others, their personal pleasure is not dependent on other people's happiness or the desire to save the world. The paragraph exhorts readers to put their own needs first while adopting a free-spirited way of living and retaining empathy for others.
Enos Rolex
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: January 14th, 2024, 11:13 am

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Enos Rolex »

Finding inner fulfillment is crucial; external pursuits may not bring lasting satisfaction. The intention behind saving the world should be genuine rather than a means of personal salvation.
Joseph Maroro
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: February 10th, 2024, 1:19 pm

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Joseph Maroro »

The paradox lies in the realization that those who solely focus on external achievements may miss the profound impact of authentic, selfless actions. In essence, the quest to save oneself through saving the world can be an elusive and unfulfilling journey.
Anthony Ekemezie
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: January 10th, 2024, 2:40 pm

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Anthony Ekemezie »

I loved reading about how you, Sir, are joyfully glad to share your experience of finding an endless supply of happiness, salvation, and an unstoppable graceful inner serenity! I am aware that we all possess an endless supply of energy, which we can access at any point in our life. Furthermore, thank you so much for your message for all of us. "
Ronald Aminga
Premium Member
Posts: 21
Joined: February 14th, 2024, 4:29 pm

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Ronald Aminga »

Meaningful relationships also contribute significantly to genuine happiness. The bonds forged with friends, family, and loved ones provide a support system that goes beyond the fleeting pleasures offered by external achievements. Shared experiences, emotional connections, and a sense of belonging can bring enduring fulfillment.
Christopher Bundi
Premium Member
Posts: 10
Joined: February 15th, 2024, 6:05 pm

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Christopher Bundi »

Those who recognize the symbiotic relationship between personal growth and external contributions tend to create a more profound and lasting impact. Embracing self-discovery and inner peace can empower individuals to approach the challenges of the world with authenticity and compassion. In this way, the journey to save oneself and the world becomes intertwined, fostering a sense of purpose that goes beyond superficial achievements.
Elijah Reuben
Premium Member
Posts: 17
Joined: May 3rd, 2024, 5:51 am

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Elijah Reuben »

The sad truth is that one person can't save the world. The irregularities and uncertainties are too numerous to contend with. As a matter of fact, many people benefit from the fact that the world is gradually going beyond repair.
Quick advice: save yourself first. Then, device means to survive in the world.
Ambar Gill
Premium Member
Posts: 14
Joined: May 7th, 2024, 12:33 am

Re: There will always be more externals to chase. Those who seek to save the world as a means to save themselves do neit

Post by Ambar Gill »

First I'd like to say I loved that last line.
"I love you but my happiness does not depend on you"
That is profound! I got literal goosebumps reading it because it's so incredibly true. Not only is happiness not found outside of you, it's exhausting in its endless search. I'm exhausted, which is what brought me down this path because surely there is a better way to do things. I think being a scapegoat is easy for people who exhaust themselves with all the pressure they put on themselves, having the world to blame is easier than saying they're tired and unhappy. If everyone just took a deep breath and took a step back, I think the world would be better for it.
Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All" by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes”

2024 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Advent of Time: A Solution to the Problem of Evil...

The Advent of Time: A Solution to the Problem of Evil...
by Indignus Servus
November 2024

Reconceptualizing Mental Illness in the Digital Age

Reconceptualizing Mental Illness in the Digital Age
by Elliott B. Martin, Jr.
October 2024

How is God Involved in Evolution?

How is God Involved in Evolution?
by Joe P. Provenzano, Ron D. Morgan, and Dan R. Provenzano
August 2024

Launchpad Republic: America's Entrepreneurial Edge and Why It Matters

Launchpad Republic: America's Entrepreneurial Edge and Why It Matters
by Howard Wolk
July 2024

Quest: Finding Freddie: Reflections from the Other Side

Quest: Finding Freddie: Reflections from the Other Side
by Thomas Richard Spradlin
June 2024

Neither Safe Nor Effective

Neither Safe Nor Effective
by Dr. Colleen Huber
May 2024

Now or Never

Now or Never
by Mary Wasche
April 2024

Meditations

Meditations
by Marcus Aurelius
March 2024

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes

Beyond the Golden Door: Seeing the American Dream Through an Immigrant's Eyes
by Ali Master
February 2024

The In-Between: Life in the Micro

The In-Between: Life in the Micro
by Christian Espinosa
January 2024

2023 Philosophy Books of the Month

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise

Entanglement - Quantum and Otherwise
by John K Danenbarger
January 2023

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul

Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless: Wisdom Behind the Incomparable Chicken Soup for the Soul
by Mitzi Perdue
February 2023

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness

Rediscovering the Wisdom of Human Nature: How Civilization Destroys Happiness
by Chet Shupe
March 2023

The Unfakeable Code®

The Unfakeable Code®
by Tony Jeton Selimi
April 2023

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
by Alan Watts
May 2023

Killing Abel

Killing Abel
by Michael Tieman
June 2023

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead

Reconfigurement: Reconfiguring Your Life at Any Stage and Planning Ahead
by E. Alan Fleischauer
July 2023

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough

First Survivor: The Impossible Childhood Cancer Breakthrough
by Mark Unger
August 2023

Predictably Irrational

Predictably Irrational
by Dan Ariely
September 2023

Artwords

Artwords
by Beatriz M. Robles
November 2023

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope

Fireproof Happiness: Extinguishing Anxiety & Igniting Hope
by Dr. Randy Ross
December 2023

2022 Philosophy Books of the Month

Emotional Intelligence At Work

Emotional Intelligence At Work
by Richard M Contino & Penelope J Holt
January 2022

Free Will, Do You Have It?

Free Will, Do You Have It?
by Albertus Kral
February 2022

My Enemy in Vietnam

My Enemy in Vietnam
by Billy Springer
March 2022

2X2 on the Ark

2X2 on the Ark
by Mary J Giuffra, PhD
April 2022

The Maestro Monologue

The Maestro Monologue
by Rob White
May 2022

What Makes America Great

What Makes America Great
by Bob Dowell
June 2022

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!

The Truth Is Beyond Belief!
by Jerry Durr
July 2022

Living in Color

Living in Color
by Mike Murphy
August 2022 (tentative)

The Not So Great American Novel

The Not So Great American Novel
by James E Doucette
September 2022

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches

Mary Jane Whiteley Coggeshall, Hicksite Quaker, Iowa/National Suffragette And Her Speeches
by John N. (Jake) Ferris
October 2022

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All

In It Together: The Beautiful Struggle Uniting Us All
by Eckhart Aurelius Hughes
November 2022

The Smartest Person in the Room: The Root Cause and New Solution for Cybersecurity

The Smartest Person in the Room
by Christian Espinosa
December 2022

2021 Philosophy Books of the Month

The Biblical Clock: The Untold Secrets Linking the Universe and Humanity with God's Plan

The Biblical Clock
by Daniel Friedmann
March 2021

Wilderness Cry: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach to Understanding God and the Universe

Wilderness Cry
by Dr. Hilary L Hunt M.D.
April 2021

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute: Tools To Spark Your Dream And Ignite Your Follow-Through

Fear Not, Dream Big, & Execute
by Jeff Meyer
May 2021

Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power

Surviving the Business of Healthcare
by Barbara Galutia Regis M.S. PA-C
June 2021

Winning the War on Cancer: The Epic Journey Towards a Natural Cure

Winning the War on Cancer
by Sylvie Beljanski
July 2021

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream

Defining Moments of a Free Man from a Black Stream
by Dr Frank L Douglas
August 2021

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts

If Life Stinks, Get Your Head Outta Your Buts
by Mark L. Wdowiak
September 2021

The Preppers Medical Handbook

The Preppers Medical Handbook
by Dr. William W Forgey M.D.
October 2021

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress: A Practical Guide

Natural Relief for Anxiety and Stress
by Dr. Gustavo Kinrys, MD
November 2021

Dream For Peace: An Ambassador Memoir

Dream For Peace
by Dr. Ghoulem Berrah
December 2021